meet tom corbett


running for Gov of PA against Alison Schwartz

Pro-life; supports state restrictions on abortion. (Nov 2010)

  • OpEd: Corbett knew federal LGBT laws; OK to change mind. (Dec 2013)
  • Supports anti-LGBT-discrimination bill, but not gay marriage. (Dec 2013)
  • Apologies for comparing gay marriage to incest. (Dec 2013)
  • Defines marriage as between a man and a woman. (Nov 2010)
  • End antiquated system of state-owned liquor stores. (Feb 2014)
  • Give up on privatizing state lottery program. (Jan 2014)
  • Justice Reinvestment: eligible offenders out of system. (Feb 2013)
  • 290 new state troopers plus 90 new civilian dispatchers. (Feb 2013)
  • Cancel unneeded expensive prison project in Fayette County. (Mar 2011)

I have to be honest, his stance is too extreme for me to want to list. So, like everything else regarding Midterms2014 …. do your research because this guy is not a great Public Servant in my opinion and if you seek out the definition of Public Servant you will see it as well …

 

are Greg Abbott’s allies this disgusting? ~ NO Woman is an “Abortion Barbie” Sir


Mom said it, a co-worker shared it, my girls brought it to life, and most Texans prove it every day — true leaders just don’t promote and condone the brand of shameless attacks Greg Abbott has unleashed and refused to denounce in this campaign.

You might even be surprised he’s a Texan when you see the posters of my face cut and pasted on a plastic doll’s body with her stomach open and a baby exposed while scissors rest inches away.

It’s wrong. It’s offensive. And Greg Abbott and his allies should know that these vicious personal attacks are not how we act in this state.

Add your name to my open letter to fight back against these attacks.

I know you are proud of our campaign, the thousands and thousands of you who have called, walked, made generous donations, shared your stories and worked for the promise of a Texas Governor who will fight for all Texans–not just some–instead of another insider who will not work for you.

That’s why these posters aren’t just insulting to me. They are demeaning and degrading to every woman.

However, that shouldn’t be a surprise coming from Abbott’s allies. This is a politician who has embraced Ted Nugent, an admitted sexual predator of young girls. This is a politician who pays the women in his office less than the men for doing the same work and has repeatedly denied the necessity of equal pay for an equal day’s work even when women are earning almost $8,000 less than men a year on average. This is a politician whose education plan for Texas is based in part on the work of a professor who actually thinks women have smaller brains than men.

Greg Abbott and his allies have proven time and again that they do not understand the challenges Texas women and that their families confront everyday. Texas deserves better.

Texas deserves substantive ideas from a leader that will fight for the future of all Texans — not just some. Instead, Abbott and his backers only offer attacks and distractions. You and I know these attacks — like the ones before them — aren’t going to distract me from what’s really at stake in this campaign. And I know that you have developed thick skin with me in these months together, and that you won’t stop fighting with me.

I am proud of my fight on behalf of Texas women. I am proud of my record of achievement for hardworking Texas families. And I am proud to have hundreds of thousands of grassroots supporters working with me.

If we work together, we can create an economy built for the jobs of tomorrow and give our kids the 21st century education they need to compete in it. That’s the Texas that will always make us proud, not the disgusting personal attacks Greg Abbott and his allies offer.

Wendy

Minimum Wage …. Joni Ernst is Wrong


By

Raising the Minimum Wage Will Help Iowa Families, But GOP Senate Candidate Joni Ernst Opposes It

We’ve written about how a number of cities and states around the country have proactively worked to raise their minimum wage, benefiting millions of hard-working Americans. There are other areas, meanwhile, where the debate over whether or not to raise the wage has become a political focal point. Iowa is a perfect example: in the deadlocked race for U.S. Senate between Democratic Rep. Bruce Braley and Republican state senator Joni Ernst, the contrast between the candidates couldn’t be clearer. Braley proudly supports an increase in the minimum wage, while Joni Ernst has stated she does not support a federal minimum wage at all and that “$7.25 is appropriate for Iowa.”

A new report and poll from CAP Action outlines just how out of touch Ernst is for Iowans and in helping create an economy that works for everyone, not just the wealthy few. While 300,000 Iowans would see their wages go up and 80 percent of Iowa voters say they could not support their household on Iowa’s minimum wage, Ernst continues to call a federal minimum wage increase “ridiculous.” This extreme position would hurt hardworking Iowans and the overall economy. Here are just a few reasons why, from the report:

  • Failing to raise the minimum wage keeps money out of workers’ pockets. Raising the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour would increase wages for 306,000 Iowans by a total of $430,462,000. Opposing a minimum-wage increase denies these workers a much-needed—and much-deserved—raise.
  • Failing to raise the minimum wage keeps Iowans poor. A $10.10 minimum wage would reduce Iowa’s nonelderly poverty rate by more than 9 percent, from 10.9 percent to 9.8 percent, and would lift more than 26,000 Iowans out of poverty.
  • Failing to raise the minimum wage hurts women in particular. 57.8 percent of Iowans who would benefit from a minimum-wage hike are women. By opposing raising the minimum wage, Ernst is disproportionately hurting women.
  • Failing to raise the minimum wage hurts the economy. Increasing the minimum wage to $10.10 would boost the Iowa economy by $272,483,000. Not raising the minimum wage prevents Iowa from growing its economy.
  • Failing to raise the minimum makes it harder for Iowa workers to make ends meet. According to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, a family of three in Des Moines needs $52,362 per year to meet minimum standards of living.

In addition to the report, CAP Action also releases a poll of Iowa voters on how they feel about these issues. Here are some key findings that illustrate how out of touch Ernst is with Iowans:

  • 80 percent say that they could not support their household on a minimum-wage salary, which is about $15,000 per year. So much for Ernst’s proclamation that $7.25 is “appropriate for Iowa.”
  • 57 percent believe that there should be a federal minimum wage, disagreeing with Ernst’s position on the matter.
  • 53 percent support raising the minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10.

BOTTOM LINE: Ernst’s radical position on the minimum wage threatens the economic security of Iowans. At a time when too many families in Iowa and across the country are still recovering from the Great Recession, we need elected officials who will act to rebuild the economy so that it once again works for everyone, not just the wealthy few.

Like CAP Action on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

Why does Greg Abbott think Ted Nugent represents Texas?


Take a moment to see Nicole’s story. Then sign up to show your support for Wendy.
If Greg Abbott thinks that Ted Nugent is an accurate representation of Texas values, he is sadly out-of-touch.

Wendy is the right choice for the women and families of Texas. Thank
you for everything you’re doing to support her in this campaign.

Elizabeth

Elizabeth Connor

Deputy Campaign Manager, Finance

Wendy R. Davis for Governor, Inc.

The 2009 Racial Justice Act


The North Carolina Racial Justice Act of 2009

…     prohibited seeking or imposing the death penalty on the basis of race. The act identified types of evidence that might be considered by the court when considering whether race was a basis for seeking or imposing the death penalty, and established a process by which relevant evidence might be used to establish that race was a significant factor in seeking or imposing the death penalty. The defendant had the burden of proving that race was a significant factor in seeking or imposing the death penalty, and the state was allowed to offer evidence to rebut the claims or evidence of the defendant. If race was found to be a significant factor in the imposition of the death penalty, the death sentence would automatically be commuted to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.[1]

North Carolina General Assembly Repeal attempts[edit]

Under pressure from a group of 43 district attorneys, who expressed opposition to the act citing the clog of the court system in the state, the North Carolina Senate passed a bill by a 27-14 vote on November 28, 2011, that would have effectively repealed the Racial Justice Act.[2] However, on December 14, Governor Bev Perdue, a Democrat, vetoed the bill, saying that while she supports the death penalty, she felt it was “simply unacceptable for racial prejudice to play a role in the imposition of the death penalty in North Carolina.”[3] The state legislature did not have enough votes to override Perdue’s veto.

Major revision (2012)[edit]

The North Carolina General Assembly passed a major revision of the law in 2012 authored by Rep. Paul Stam (R-Wake). The rewrite “severely restricts the use of statistics to only the county or judicial district where the crime occurred, instead of the entire state or region. It also says statistics alone are insufficient to prove bias, and that the race of the victim cannot be taken into account.” The bill was vetoed by Gov. Perdue, but this time, the legislature overrode the governor’s veto.[4]

Repeal[edit]

The North Carolina General Assembly voted to effectively repeal the entire law in 2013 and Gov. Pat McCrory, a Republican, signed the repeal into law.[5]

Appeals under act[edit]

On April 20, 2012, in the first case appealed under the Racial Justice Act, the then-Senior Resident Superior Court Judge in Cumberland County (Fayetteville), Judge Greg Weeks, threw out the death sentence of Marcus Raymond Robinson, automatically commuting his sentence to life without parole. Robinson contended that when he was sentenced to death in 1994, prosecutors deliberately kept blacks off the jury. Robinson’s lawyers cited a study from Michigan State University College of Law indicating that prosecutors across North Carolina improperly used their peremptory challenges to systemically exclude qualified black jurors from jury service.[6][7][8]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up ^ Senate Bill 461, General Assembly of North Carolina, Session 2009
  2. Jump up ^ Bufkin, Sarah. “North Carolina General Assembly Votes To Repeal Landmark Racial Justice Law”. Think Progress: Justice. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  3. Jump up ^ Jarvis, Greg (2012-12-15). “Perdue veto saves death-row appeal law”. The News & Observer. 
  4. Jump up ^ News & Observer
  5. Jump up ^ Charlotte Observer
  6. Jump up ^ “Judge: Racism played role in Cumberland County trial, death sentence converted in N.C.’s first Racial Justice Act case”. The Fayetteville Observer. April 20, 2012. Retrieved April 21, 2012. 
  7. Jump up ^ “Racial bias saves death row man”. BBC News (BBC). April 20, 2012. Retrieved April 21, 2012. 
  8. Jump up ^ Zucchino, David (April 20, 2012). “Death penalty vacated under North Carolina’s racial justice law”. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 21, 2012.

Resource …wiki