meet Wendy Davis …


and NOT Greg Abbott …

Texas is home to millions of hardworking people of all backgrounds. Every Texan deserves an economy that will provide a quality education, good paying jobs, adequate infrastructure, and is equipped to move our great state into the future.

I’m the only candidate in this race with a vision for an economy that works for all hardworking Texans regardless of where you are from or what you look like. My plan focuses on:

  • Creating good paying jobs for Texans;
  • Investing more in schools so children are better prepared for the future;
  • Making smart decisions on transportation and water;
  • Enacting equal pay for equal work;
  • Cracking down on payday lending;
  • Closing the loopholes that cost taxpayers – like tax breaks for country clubs.

Greg Abbott has a plan too, a plan that benefits his insider allies and not hardworking Texans. We are fighting for something bigger — an economy in which all hardworking Texans have the opportunity to thrive.

7/23 Below is some great information from Wendy and a Call to help make sure she WINS TEXAS … Contribute!

Texas is a big state. There are over 13 million registered voters, representing every perspective you can think of — and we’re registering new voters every day. Our democracy is better when all of those voices are heard.

This morning, on a call with Democratic allies and our volunteers across the state, our campaign unveiled our Voter Protection Program for the fall. We’re going to fight to make sure every eligible Texan has access to the polls. It includes four major priorities:

  • Make Registering Easy: It’s critical our volunteers are trained in voter registration rules so they can efficiently help voters get registered.
  • Educate Voters: Our communications efforts — on the air, on the ground, and online — are top-notch. We’re going to use that network to make sure every voter knows how to successfully cast a ballot.
  • Promote Early Voting: Early voting in Texas starts in less than 90 days. For any Texan able to do so, we want them to vote early. In October, we will launch a statewide Election Protection Hotline to monitor irregularities in in-person early voting and will place well-trained volunteers at the polls.
  • Protecting the Vote on Election Day: From having volunteers at the polls to answer questions to setting up command centers across the state, we’re planning a massive Election Day operation to ensure voters can make their voices heard.

But in order to run our program effectively and make sure every vote counts, we need your help to fund these grassroots efforts. Help us reach our $350,000 goal before July ends. Contribute $5.

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Texans have a clear choice in the race for the next governor.

We can elect someone who supports policies that favor political insiders at the expense of hardworking Texans and their families.

Or we can elect someone who fights for all Texans — regardless of their age, race or gender.

We can elect someone who believes that politics as usual works just fine in order to move Texas forward.

Or we can elect someone who knows that for Texas to lead in the future, we need to make sure all our kids get a 21st century education and we have an economy built for the jobs of tomorrow.

This is the choice. This is the contrast between my opponent, Greg Abbott, and me.

While Abbott has spent his entire political career looking out for political insiders, I’ve spent my career in public service fighting for hardworking Texans and their families.

There’s no better example than our views on education policy.

I launched my campaign talking about education because of the critical difference it made to my family and me.

That’s why I’ve provided specific proposals to ensure every Texas child has the chance to succeed in a 21st century economy. My “Great Schools: Great Texas” proposes:

  • Full day pre-K education to every eligible child in Texas
  • Incentives to recruit and retain the next generation of great teachers
  • Expanded college opportunities for Texas high school students
  • Less standardized testing and more teaching with the resources needed to do it

Meanwhile, Abbott offered up a pre-K proposal that picks and chooses winners and losers. His plan could force 4-year-olds to take standardized tests that determine whether they get the rug yanked out from under them by starving their pre-K classroom of critical resources. There is no clearer proof of how misguided Abbott’s views on education are than this proposal.

I fought to prevent more than $5 billion in cuts to our public schools that led to school closings, teacher layoffs and overcrowded classrooms.

However, instead of joining the nearly 600 Texas school districts that went to court to stop it, Abbott fought them in their lawsuit every step of the way.

However, education is just one clear example of the differences between us.

Equal pay for equal work: Abbott says he will veto common-sense legislation that ensures women are paid as much as men for doing the same work. I will sign that legislation the minute it lands on my desk.

Texas border communities: Abbott demeaned them as the “third world.” I will work with local leaders to make sure their voice is heard and work together to improve education, build up their infrastructure and attract the kind of businesses they need in a 21st century economy.

Veterans: Abbott has accepted almost $200,000 from the payday lending industry and stood by while they preyed on Texas’ men and women in uniform. I worked to crack down on abusive payday lending practices and to limit the outrageous interest rates charged to U.S. military members and their families.

These are just some clear early examples that demonstrate Abbott is just not working for you. And it demonstrates a disturbing pattern of working for insiders at the expense of Texas families. Texas deserves a governor who fights for all hardworking Texans — not just the special interests.

That’s why I’m running.

But that wasn’t always my intention. As a 19-year-old single mom working two jobs, it was hard to imagine going to college, rising to the top of my class at Texas Christian University and earning a chance to attend a prestigious Ivy League law school. I didn’t dream of serving on the Fort Worth City Council or in the state Senate. And I certainly didn’t imagine running for governor.

I just wanted to make ends meet and make a better life for my daughter Amber and me. But I was able to achieve those things through hard work and sacrifice along with a healthy dose of help from family and friends.

That’s why I believe in the promise of Texas — a promise rooted in the belief that if you work hard, where you start in life shouldn’t determine how far you can go.

As governor, that’s one promise I will always fight to make sure we keep.

Thanks,

Wendy

Resource: Wendy’s website

pam bondi & rick scott, Republicans … marriage equality


by Scott​ Arceneaux

We knew that Pam Bondi and Rick Scott were pushing their radical agenda when they said that marriage equality would cause “great harm” to the state.

Now, they’re digging themselves deeper into the hole.

Earlier this week, Bondi tried to stand by her statement by claiming that marriage equality would make the state’s computers crash and that the paperwork needed to get it done would bog down the state’s systems.

Bondi and Rick Scott don’t get it. 19 states already have allowed their citizens to marry the ones they love — and their state hasn’t crumbled. Can you click here and tell Rick Scott and Pam Bondi to let all Floridians marry whomever they love?

Together, we can help our state get away from the bigoted leadership of Rick Scott, who is no stranger to gay-bullying. In 2010, Scott said that “I don’t believe that foster care should be done by single-sex couples.”

Add your name to tell Rick Scott and Pam Bondi that enough is enough: It’s time to realize that love is love.

Thanks for all you do,

Scott​ Arceneaux

Meet Republican Tom Cotton …


running against Mark Pryor

U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton, you may remember, was a co-sponsor of the “Life at Conception Act,” a so-called personhood measure which would give full constitutional rights to each “preborn human person” at the “moment of fertilization. In addition to being a frontal assault on Roe v. Wade, the bill (likely unconstitutional) could ban certain forms of birth control such as IUDs or the morning-after pill. (It could also potentially force women into dangerous pregnancies and to deliver babies that can’t survive outside the womb, or force families in situations like this to keep a braindead woman on life support). COTTON: Co-sponsored bill that could ban certain forms of birth control. Click the graphic for the complete article  COTTON: Co-sponsored bill that could ban certain forms of birth control.

I know no candidate is perfect but if they are running to represent you as a Public Servant there are certain mandatory things they should all live up to … like the oath they take, which is seemingly being tossed aside by Republicans

I am sure there must be more information about where Tom Cotton stands on the issues …. do your research

I have to say that having spent a few minutes looking for actual comments from Mr.Cotton about the issues facing our 21st Century lives is not readily available. I went to plenty of sites, but one that claims they are a factcheck site seemed somewhat biased against mark pryor though they did divulge that Rep tom cotton did have an association or worked with the insurance industry at one time stating, “Cotton’s insurance experience is limited to consulting work for a federal agency.” This seems significant to me, but I am no expert.  The article does not think his consulting work is important, but seems to use the potato paatato meme quite often in their fact checking when his constituents deserve to know what part he played as an insurance consultant. I have a problem with the bottom line! That Rep.Tom Cotton seems to back stripping seniors of Medicare, assuming women have no common sense, backing  any budget coming from Rep.Paul Ryan – Those are just a few of many issues that seems buried in a lot of the surface articles concerning Mr. Cotton. So, it would be in the best interest of the People in Arkansas to ask questions of Tom Cotton … Where do you stand in this 21st Century life? Climate Change, Reproductive Rights, Immigration, ACA and tell your constituents why the GOP has no viable replacement bills plans to replace anything they may want to repeal ? I think the lack of plans offered up proves just how unqualified the 113th Republican members of Congress are

So, there is more information …. of course and for the complete article ~ search for the2013 headline in huffingtonpost.com

Tom Cotton In 1997: Women’s ‘Greatest Fear’ Is Men Leaving Them

Posted: 08/09/2013 1:48 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/13/2013

among other things …below

Cotton, a freshman congressman who is running for Senate in 2014, warned feminists in a 1997 article for the Harvard Crimson that no-fault divorce will backfire on them by enabling their husbands to leave them for trophy wives.

“Feminists say no fault divorce was a large hurdle on the path to female liberation,” Cotton wrote. “They apparently don’t consult the deepest hopes or greatest fears of young women.”

The Only African American Automobile Company! ~~ Lonnie G. Bunch at The NMAAHC


NMAAHC -- National Museum of African American History and Culture

Lonnie Bunch, museum director, historian, lecturer, and author, is proud to present A Page from Our American Story, a regular on-line series for Museum supporters. It will showcase individuals and events in the African American experience, placing these stories in the context of a larger story — our American story.
A Page From Our American Story
At the dawn of the Automobile Age in the early 20th century, hundreds of small auto companies sprouted up across America as entrepreneurs recognized that society was transitioning from horse-drawn carriages to transportation powered by the internal combustion engine. Some of these early companies grew to become giants that are still with us today, such as Ford and Chevrolet. Many others remained small, struggling to compete against the assembly lines of the larger manufacturers.One such company was C.R. Patterson & Sons of Greenfield, Ohio, makers of the Patterson-Greenfield automobile from 1915 to 1918. Though its name is little recognized today, there is in fact a very importantreasontoensure that it is not lost to history: it was, and remains to this day,theonlyAfrican American owned and operated automobile company.

Frederick Patterson with a prototype of the Patterson-Greenfield automobile.

Charles Richard Patterson was born into slavery on a Virginia plantation in 1833. Not much is known about his life on the plantation, and historians have to sift through conflicting reports about how he came to settle in Greenfield, Ohio, a town with strong abolitionist sympathies. Some say his family arrived in the 1840s, possibly after purchasing their freedom; others suggest Patterson alone escaped in 1861. In any case, he learned the skills of the blacksmith and found work in the carriage-making trade, where he developed a reputation for building a high quality product. In 1873, he formed a business partnership with another carriage maker in town, J.P. Lowe, who was white, and eventually became sole proprietor of the renamed C.R. Patterson & Sons in 1893. It was a successful business employing an integrated workforce of 35-50 by the turn of the century, and Charles Patterson became a prominent and respected citizen in Greenfield. His catalog listed some 28 models, from simple open buggies to larger and more expensive closed carriages for doctors and other professionals.

When Patterson died in 1910, the business passed to his son Frederick, who was already something of a pioneer. He was college-educated and was the first black athlete to play football for Ohio State University. He was also an early member and vice president of the National Negro Business League founded by Booker T. Washington. Now, as owner and operator of the enterprise his father started, Frederick Patterson began to see the handwriting on the wall: the days of carriages and horse-drawn buggies were nearing an end.

Early advertisement for the Patterson-Greenfield automobile. At first, the company offered repair and restoration services for the “horseless carriages” that were beginning to proliferate on the streets of Greenfield. No doubt this gave workers the opportunity to gain some hands-on knowledge about these noisy, smoky and often unreliable contraptions. Like his father, Frederick was a strong believer in advertising and placed his first ad for auto repair services in the local paper in 1913. Initially, the work mostly involved repainting bodies and reupholstering interiors, but as the shop gained more experience with engines and drivetrains, they began to offer sophisticated upgrades and improvements to electrical and mechanical systems as well.

This valuable experience allowed C.R. Patterson & Sons to take the next great step in its own story as well as in African American history: in 1915, it announced the availability of the Patterson-Greenfield automobile at a price of $685. From the company’s publicity efforts, it is evident they were bursting with pride:

“Our car is made with three distinct purposes in mind. First — It is not intended for a large car. It is designed to take the place originally held by the family surrey. It is a 5-passenger vehicle, ample and luxurious. Second — It is intended to meet the requirements of that class of users, who, though perfectly able to spend twice the amount, yet feel that a machine should not engross a disproportionate share of expenditure, and especially it should not do so to the exclusion of proper provisions for home and home comfort, and the travel of varied other pleasurable and beneficial entertainment. It is a sensibly priced car. Third — It is intended to carry with it (and it does so to perfection) every conceivable convenience and every luxury known to car manufacture. There is absolutely nothing shoddy about it. Nothing skimp and stingy.”

A child leans out of a 1917 Patterson-Greenfield roadster. Orders began to come in, and C.R. Patterson & Sons officially entered the ranks of American auto manufacturers. Over the years, several models of coupes and sedans were offered, including a stylish “Red Devil” speedster. Ads featured the car’s 30hp Continental 4-cylinder engine, full floating rear axle, cantilever springs, electric starting and lighting, and a split windshield for ventilation. The build quality of the Patterson-Greenfield automobile was as highly regarded as it had been with their carriages.

The initial hope and optimism, however, proved to be fairly short-lived. In an age of increased mechanization and production lines, small independent shops featuring hand-built, high quality products weren’t able to scale up production or compete on price against the rapidly growing car companies out of Detroit. In small quantities, parts and supplies were expensive and hard to come by when major manufacturers were buying them by the trainload at greatly reduced costs. Plus, the labor hours per car were much higher than that of assembly line manufacturers. As a result, the profit margin on each Patterson-Greenfield was low.

A Patterson-Greenfield bus printed with the words 'Greenfield School District'. In 1918, having built by some estimates between 30 and 150 vehicles, C.R. Patterson & Sons halted auto production and concentrated once again on the repair side of the business. But they weren’t done yet. In the 1920s, the company began building truck and bus bodies to be fitted on chassis made by other manufacturers. It was in a sense a return to their original skills in building carriage bodies without engines and drivetrains and, for a period of time, the company was quite profitable. Then in 1929, the stock market crashed and the Great Depression set in. As with many small businesses, sales dried up and loans were hard to obtain. The company, now run by the sons of Frederick Patterson, soldiered on until 1939 when, after 74 years, C.R. Patterson & Sons closed its doors forever.

Sadly, no Patterson-Greenfield automobiles are known to survive today. But we should not let that dim the fact that two great entrepreneurs, Charles Richard Patterson and his son Frederick Patterson built and sustained a business that lasted several generations and earned a place not just in African American history, but in automotive history as well.

 Portrait of Lonnie Bunch All the best,
Signed by Lonnie Bunch
Lonnie Bunch
Director

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the newest member of the Smithsonian Institution’s family of extraordinary museums. The museum will be far more than a collection of objects. The Museum will be a powerful, positive force in the national discussion about race and the important role African Americans have played in the American story — a museum that will make all Americans proud.

P.S. We can only reach our $250 million goal with your help. I hope you will consider making a donation or becoming a Charter Member today.

Challenge Pam Bondi and Rick Scott’s ACTIONS! ~~~ ALERT@fladems.com


End Rick Scott and Pam Bondi's war on equality by chipping in before the primary election >>