GOP Senate Majority To Raise Retirement Age, Cut Medicare


campaignForAmericaLgo

The Republicans have made big promises to their ultra-wealthy financial backers: Should they take the Senate, they promise to cut ‘entitlements’ and pass the savings on with more tax cuts for the 1%.

 

This isn’t fear mongering. This is taking them at their word. Republicans have promised to raise Medicare age and cut Social Security benefits.

 

  • Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley, who would become chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, proposed legislation to raise the retirement age to 70 and supported President Bush’s plans to privatize the system.

 

  • Representative Bill Cassidy, who hopes to replace Mary Landrieu as senator from Louisiana, has pledged to raise the retirement age to 70 and turn Medicare into a voucher program.

 

  • Senators Ron Johnson and Ted Cruz both refer to Social Security as a “Giant Ponzi Scheme.” Cruz went further, going on the record with the Texas Tribune for privatization. As Texas solicitor general, he even sued the federal government to strike down Medicare’s prescription benefit.

 

  • Senator Jeff Flake of Arizona said he’d prefer “savings in entitlement programs rather than defense spending.”

 

 

 

Campaign for America’s Future has defeated similar bad ideas before. We’ve done it when Democrats are in charge, and we’ve done it when Republicans held all three branches of government.

 

Can you make a donation of $15 today to help us in this fight? We are now pushing to EXPAND, not cut Social Security. And we are gearing up the alliances, and strategies needed to meet the coming attacks. We will not accept any cuts to benefits older Americans have earned.

.

In 2010, Representative Paul Ryan and House Republicans tried to use their new majority in the House to raise the retirement age and cut benefits. We fought back and prevented a “Grand Bargain.” Right-wing GOPers wore their folly around their necks in the 2012 election and it helped re-elect Barack Obama.

In 2015, the assault is likely to be a retirement age of 70 and yet another attempt to replace Medicare with vouchers.

We will not let them savage Americans who are vulnerable because of retirement or disability.

To do this, we need your help. Can you contribute $15 to help us gird for the fight we face? Join us as we work for a country that works for everyone, not just the wealthy and privileged.

in solidarity … 2014


Wethepeople

just another rant

If you believe in moving into the 21st Century, believe in health care being accessible to all , if you believe it is a right not a privilege or that the overhaul to health care is long overdue; then you are on the right side of history.  keepabortionlegalHowever, members of Congress are portraying the ACA as a law for the poor though most parents with kids in college would say they are not poor or rich and having their children covered until 26 is a relief. The law is not perfect, but Medicare PartD is still here far from perfect, lest we talk about that Donut Hole that has hurt our seniors in ways Congress refuses to deal with, it goes without saying that hearing the donut hole will stay in place until 2020 is sad.George Mason University

I would like members of Congress to tell voters why they are against the idea that 32mil more people will have access to a health care system that will need more doctors, PA, and those great nurses who we usually see when we feel bad. Think about it, what does it take to run a Hospital?

Our myhealthcareisnotdebateablecurrent workforce cannot possibly handle that many new customers and will need to hire more folks from the so-called bottom up for the grounds, parking lots, security, maintenance, janitors, gardeners to receptionists, and more.

ACAThe Affordable Care Act has been batted abused trashed and voted against by the GOP over 40 times. The odd thing leading up to each vote, is that the facts did not seem to get into the way of Congress nor did they care that #ACA is the law of the land. Republicans chose to call it a bill, deny it has helped adults with pre-existing conditions, seniors and parents with kids under 26. It is beyond offensive that these votes not only cost Americans money to hold but a law that has been challenged and SCOTUS upheld actually seems like a travesty of our democracy then Rep.TedCruz decided to take $24 Billion out of the House of Representatives to make some sort of point against the Affordable Care Act. I do not know about you but I wonder where is the $24Billion outrage, the demand for more explanations about who is going to pay it back. Americans should be demanding the GOP give up whatever they have planned to cover that $24BillionGOPShutdown.

I ask voters, if you are concerned at all about the $24Billion 17day RepTedCruz waged on us why stay silent.Npelosiwomenshc  I hope folks wonder who will ultimately pay for it and why the media conveniently keeps bypassing all questions about the shutdown. I want answers from Rep.TedCruz and he should be forced to take responsibility and most Americans should demand that any deals coming from the GOP be reconciled against that $24Billion 17 day #ACA shutdown.

keepfamilieshealthy I cannot begin to list the impact of 32million more people added to the new health care system, but it is obvious that the Affordable Care Act is also a jobs creator.

In Solidarity … we must get off the sidelines and fight back

Anna Galland, MoveOn.org Civic Action and Iraq


U.S. bombing strikes are now well under way in Iraq in a military mission that President Obama said could go on for months.1 U.S. military planes have also been delivering vital humanitarian assistance to civilians fleeing the violence, including Yazidis who were forced onto Iraq’s Mount Sinjar by ISIS militants laying siege on the mountain.2

MoveOn members across the country have weighed in with thoughts on what’s happening in Iraq. There are varying opinions on different aspects of this crisis, but there are some common threads. Our hearts break for the people of Iraq who are living through this conflict. We know there are no simple solutions. And we’re united in our opposition to America sliding down the slippery slope to another war in Iraq.

As we all try to make sense of the events that are unfolding, here are eight things that you should know about the Iraq crisis.

Please read on and then share the list on Facebook or Twitter, or just forward this email. It’s vital that we engage the country in a conversation about the U.S. role in Iraq.

8 Things to Know about the Iraq Crisis

1. Right-wing war hawks are pushing for another full-blown war in Iraq.

Senator John McCain, Senator Lindsey Graham, other Republicans in Congress, and right-wing figures—who blindly led America into invading and occupying Iraq—are now demanding more military action that could drag us back into full-scale war in the region.3,4,5

2. The slippery slope is real.

Mission creep can too easily occur—along with unintended consequences and new problems created by the use of U.S. military force.6,7 History shows us that many big wars start out looking small, including the Korean War and the Vietnam War.8 And we are now dealing with a prime example of unintended consequences: Bush’s war of choice and military occupation of Iraq set the stage for Iraq’s troubles today, including the rise of ISIS.9,10,11,12

3. Voters elected President Obama to end the Iraq war that George W. Bush recklessly started. 

President Obama’s opposition to the Iraq war before it began and his pledge to end it—as part of the contrast between him and those who pushed for war—were key to his success in both the Democratic primary election and the general election in 2008.13 He continues to pledge that he “will not allow the United States to be dragged into fighting another war in Iraq.”14,15

4. Ultimately, Iraq’s problems can be solved only by an Iraqi-led political solution. 

President Obama has said that there is no military solution to the crisis in Iraq and that there can only be “an Iraqi solution.”16 As this Vox explainer lays out:”ISIS isn’t just a terrorist group rampaging through Iraq (though they definitely are that). It’s in many ways an expression of the Sunni Muslim minority’s anger at the Shia-dominated government. . . Some Sunni grievances get to more fundamental issues within the Iraqi state itself, beyond what even a better government could easily fix.”17 

These are not problems that more U.S. bombings can solve. That’s why experts are saying that “any lasting solution has to be regional in nature and must address the political interests of all the major factions in an equitable and inclusive manner.”18

5. Members of Congress, including Democratic lawmakers, are insisting that the president come to Congress for authorization. 

MoveOn members have long opposed endless war in Iraq. Earlier this summer, before the current bombing strikes began, MoveOn members made more than 15,000 calls to lawmakers, urging them to oppose U.S. military intervention in Iraq. In July, the House of Representatives listened to them and the rest of the American people to require, by a bipartisan vote of 370-40, the president to seek congressional authorization before deploying or maintaining a sustained combat role in Iraq.19 Congress should continue to assert its authority under the Constitution to authorize and oversee U.S. commitments to open-ended war overseas.

6. The Middle East is a complicated place where U.S. military intervention has a troubling track record

The Middle East has many armed actors whose motivations often compete with each other and conflict with American values, and U.S. military intervention there has a track record of often making things worse.20,21 One tragic absurdity of this moment is that the U.S. military is now using U.S. equipment to bomb U.S. weapons wielded by enemies the U.S. didn’t intend to arm against the U.S. and U.S. allies.22 That’s a good reason to be concerned about the U.S. arming rebels in nearby Syria, which experts say wouldn’t have stopped the rise of ISIS anyway.23 Experts further warn that U.S. military force in the region only tends to create more problems, including the risk of terrorist retaliation.24
 
7. Military action could lead to even more innocent civilians getting caught in the crossfire and suffering. 

The Iraq war that Bush started didn’t just cost America the lives of nearly 4,500 service members, plus $2 trillion according to modest estimates.25,26,27 Approximately 500,000 Iraqi civilians also died in the armed conflict—possibly more.28 In the current conflict, ISIS militants are persecuting various minority populations of Iraq, such as the Yazidis who had fled to Mount Sinjar.29 Escalating military action, including drone strikes, risks catching more civilians in the crossfire.30

8. Opposing endless war isn’t the same as being an isolationist. The Iraq crisis, including the humanitarian disaster, demands an international, diplomatic response. 

We have options to support the people of Iraq, as well as tackle this crisis in a way that reflects America’s best interests and 21st century realities. For one, the U.S. can work through the United Nations and other multilateral organizations to support a major global diplomatic initiative.31In the face of the current crisis, the Friends Committee on National Legislation also recommends a number of steps instead of U.S. bombings, such as working with other nations through the United Nations to organize humanitarian evacuations of stranded and trapped civilians, pressing for and upholding an arms embargo in Iraq and Syria, engaging with the UN to reinvigorate efforts for a lasting political solution for Iraq and Syria, and increasing humanitarian aid.32,33

It’s critically important that we engage the nation in conversation and debate to avoid endless war in Iraq. Can you share this “8 Things to Know about the Iraq Crisis” list with your family and friends?

Thanks for all you do.

–Anna, Jo, Alejandro, Justin, and the rest of the teamSources: Click here to view the citations.

Want to support our work? MoveOn Civic Action is entirely funded by our 8 million members—no corporate contributions, no big checks from CEOs. And our tiny staff ensures that small contributions go a long way. Chip in here.

Climate deniers …


 

Published on May 11, 2014

marco rubio this week abc on climate change. “I don’t agree with the notion that some are putting out there — including scientists — that somehow, there are actions we can take today that would actually have an impact on what’s happening in our climate,” Rubio insisted. “Our climate is always changing. And what they have chosen to do is take a handful of decades of research, and say that this is now evidence of a longer-term trend that’s directly and almost solely attributable to manmade activity.”

“I don’t know of any era in world history where the climate has been stable,” he added. “Climate is always evolving. Natural disaster have always existed.”

“But let me get this straight,” Karl interrupted. “You do not believe human activity — C02 — has caused warming to our planet?”

“I do not believe that human activity is causing these dramatic changes to our climate the way these scientist are portraying it,” Rubio said. “And I do not believe the laws that they propose we pass will do anything about it. Except, it will destroy our economy.”

Watch the video below from ABC’s This Week, broadcast May 11, 2014.
description from rawstory

CPAC Speech