meet Wendy Davis …


and NOT Greg Abbott …

Texas is home to millions of hardworking people of all backgrounds. Every Texan deserves an economy that will provide a quality education, good paying jobs, adequate infrastructure, and is equipped to move our great state into the future.

I’m the only candidate in this race with a vision for an economy that works for all hardworking Texans regardless of where you are from or what you look like. My plan focuses on:

  • Creating good paying jobs for Texans;
  • Investing more in schools so children are better prepared for the future;
  • Making smart decisions on transportation and water;
  • Enacting equal pay for equal work;
  • Cracking down on payday lending;
  • Closing the loopholes that cost taxpayers – like tax breaks for country clubs.

Greg Abbott has a plan too, a plan that benefits his insider allies and not hardworking Texans. We are fighting for something bigger — an economy in which all hardworking Texans have the opportunity to thrive.

7/23 Below is some great information from Wendy and a Call to help make sure she WINS TEXAS … Contribute!

Texas is a big state. There are over 13 million registered voters, representing every perspective you can think of — and we’re registering new voters every day. Our democracy is better when all of those voices are heard.

This morning, on a call with Democratic allies and our volunteers across the state, our campaign unveiled our Voter Protection Program for the fall. We’re going to fight to make sure every eligible Texan has access to the polls. It includes four major priorities:

  • Make Registering Easy: It’s critical our volunteers are trained in voter registration rules so they can efficiently help voters get registered.
  • Educate Voters: Our communications efforts — on the air, on the ground, and online — are top-notch. We’re going to use that network to make sure every voter knows how to successfully cast a ballot.
  • Promote Early Voting: Early voting in Texas starts in less than 90 days. For any Texan able to do so, we want them to vote early. In October, we will launch a statewide Election Protection Hotline to monitor irregularities in in-person early voting and will place well-trained volunteers at the polls.
  • Protecting the Vote on Election Day: From having volunteers at the polls to answer questions to setting up command centers across the state, we’re planning a massive Election Day operation to ensure voters can make their voices heard.

But in order to run our program effectively and make sure every vote counts, we need your help to fund these grassroots efforts. Help us reach our $350,000 goal before July ends. Contribute $5.

===============================================

Texans have a clear choice in the race for the next governor.

We can elect someone who supports policies that favor political insiders at the expense of hardworking Texans and their families.

Or we can elect someone who fights for all Texans — regardless of their age, race or gender.

We can elect someone who believes that politics as usual works just fine in order to move Texas forward.

Or we can elect someone who knows that for Texas to lead in the future, we need to make sure all our kids get a 21st century education and we have an economy built for the jobs of tomorrow.

This is the choice. This is the contrast between my opponent, Greg Abbott, and me.

While Abbott has spent his entire political career looking out for political insiders, I’ve spent my career in public service fighting for hardworking Texans and their families.

There’s no better example than our views on education policy.

I launched my campaign talking about education because of the critical difference it made to my family and me.

That’s why I’ve provided specific proposals to ensure every Texas child has the chance to succeed in a 21st century economy. My “Great Schools: Great Texas” proposes:

  • Full day pre-K education to every eligible child in Texas
  • Incentives to recruit and retain the next generation of great teachers
  • Expanded college opportunities for Texas high school students
  • Less standardized testing and more teaching with the resources needed to do it

Meanwhile, Abbott offered up a pre-K proposal that picks and chooses winners and losers. His plan could force 4-year-olds to take standardized tests that determine whether they get the rug yanked out from under them by starving their pre-K classroom of critical resources. There is no clearer proof of how misguided Abbott’s views on education are than this proposal.

I fought to prevent more than $5 billion in cuts to our public schools that led to school closings, teacher layoffs and overcrowded classrooms.

However, instead of joining the nearly 600 Texas school districts that went to court to stop it, Abbott fought them in their lawsuit every step of the way.

However, education is just one clear example of the differences between us.

Equal pay for equal work: Abbott says he will veto common-sense legislation that ensures women are paid as much as men for doing the same work. I will sign that legislation the minute it lands on my desk.

Texas border communities: Abbott demeaned them as the “third world.” I will work with local leaders to make sure their voice is heard and work together to improve education, build up their infrastructure and attract the kind of businesses they need in a 21st century economy.

Veterans: Abbott has accepted almost $200,000 from the payday lending industry and stood by while they preyed on Texas’ men and women in uniform. I worked to crack down on abusive payday lending practices and to limit the outrageous interest rates charged to U.S. military members and their families.

These are just some clear early examples that demonstrate Abbott is just not working for you. And it demonstrates a disturbing pattern of working for insiders at the expense of Texas families. Texas deserves a governor who fights for all hardworking Texans — not just the special interests.

That’s why I’m running.

But that wasn’t always my intention. As a 19-year-old single mom working two jobs, it was hard to imagine going to college, rising to the top of my class at Texas Christian University and earning a chance to attend a prestigious Ivy League law school. I didn’t dream of serving on the Fort Worth City Council or in the state Senate. And I certainly didn’t imagine running for governor.

I just wanted to make ends meet and make a better life for my daughter Amber and me. But I was able to achieve those things through hard work and sacrifice along with a healthy dose of help from family and friends.

That’s why I believe in the promise of Texas — a promise rooted in the belief that if you work hard, where you start in life shouldn’t determine how far you can go.

As governor, that’s one promise I will always fight to make sure we keep.

Thanks,

Wendy

Resource: Wendy’s website

Staci Appel for Iowa


Updates …

Please click here to take a look at our ad, and then share it to help us keep getting our message out!

Thank you,
Staci

 

If you’ve saved your payment information with ActBlue Express, your donation will go through immediately:

With Staci’s potential opponents headed to a convention this week, we can only expect their extreme positions to get even worse as they try to appeal to the same Tea Party base that endorsed Rick Santorum just two years ago.

Nothing is more shocking, though, than Brad Zaun’s and Matt Schultz’s shared views on women. They’ve both signaled support for a proposal which would severely limit a woman’s ability to make her own medical decisions.

This is precisely the reason that it is time for Iowa to Staci Appel Congress. For too long we’ve let men decide questions of women’s health – it’s time to give women a voice. Add your name today to stand with Staci against our opponents’ reckless proposal.

These so called “personhood amendments” are the latest far-right ploy to set women’s rights back nearly 50 years.

Staci is ready to take on whomever their nominee is this fall, but if it is one of these guys, this fight is going to be especially important to women across the country. This backward-looking regulation of women’s bodies needs to stop!

Join us today and stand against their reckless and outdated attempts to take away a woman’s right to make decisions regarding her body. They’re too extreme for Iowa, and that is exactly why it’s time for Iowa to send a woman to Washington.

Thanks for standing with us today.

Sarah Shepson
Appel for Iowa

Meet Republican Tom Cotton …


running against Mark Pryor

U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton, you may remember, was a co-sponsor of the “Life at Conception Act,” a so-called personhood measure which would give full constitutional rights to each “preborn human person” at the “moment of fertilization. In addition to being a frontal assault on Roe v. Wade, the bill (likely unconstitutional) could ban certain forms of birth control such as IUDs or the morning-after pill. (It could also potentially force women into dangerous pregnancies and to deliver babies that can’t survive outside the womb, or force families in situations like this to keep a braindead woman on life support). COTTON: Co-sponsored bill that could ban certain forms of birth control. Click the graphic for the complete article  COTTON: Co-sponsored bill that could ban certain forms of birth control.

I know no candidate is perfect but if they are running to represent you as a Public Servant there are certain mandatory things they should all live up to … like the oath they take, which is seemingly being tossed aside by Republicans

I am sure there must be more information about where Tom Cotton stands on the issues …. do your research

I have to say that having spent a few minutes looking for actual comments from Mr.Cotton about the issues facing our 21st Century lives is not readily available. I went to plenty of sites, but one that claims they are a factcheck site seemed somewhat biased against mark pryor though they did divulge that Rep tom cotton did have an association or worked with the insurance industry at one time stating, “Cotton’s insurance experience is limited to consulting work for a federal agency.” This seems significant to me, but I am no expert.  The article does not think his consulting work is important, but seems to use the potato paatato meme quite often in their fact checking when his constituents deserve to know what part he played as an insurance consultant. I have a problem with the bottom line! That Rep.Tom Cotton seems to back stripping seniors of Medicare, assuming women have no common sense, backing  any budget coming from Rep.Paul Ryan – Those are just a few of many issues that seems buried in a lot of the surface articles concerning Mr. Cotton. So, it would be in the best interest of the People in Arkansas to ask questions of Tom Cotton … Where do you stand in this 21st Century life? Climate Change, Reproductive Rights, Immigration, ACA and tell your constituents why the GOP has no viable replacement bills plans to replace anything they may want to repeal ? I think the lack of plans offered up proves just how unqualified the 113th Republican members of Congress are

So, there is more information …. of course and for the complete article ~ search for the2013 headline in huffingtonpost.com

Tom Cotton In 1997: Women’s ‘Greatest Fear’ Is Men Leaving Them

Posted: 08/09/2013 1:48 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/13/2013

among other things …below

Cotton, a freshman congressman who is running for Senate in 2014, warned feminists in a 1997 article for the Harvard Crimson that no-fault divorce will backfire on them by enabling their husbands to leave them for trophy wives.

“Feminists say no fault divorce was a large hurdle on the path to female liberation,” Cotton wrote. “They apparently don’t consult the deepest hopes or greatest fears of young women.”

meet mike rounds, Republican South Dakota


running against the Democratic Party, Rick Weiland ~ South Dakota

U.S. Chamber of Commerce Endorses Rounds for U.S. Senate Pierre, SD May 13, 2014- Gov. Mike Rounds announced today that he has received an endorsement letter from the U. S. Chamber of Commerce supporting his bid to become South Dakota’s next U.S. Senator. Read More

  2 full quotes on Civil Rights OR background on Civil Rights.    

  • Marriage should be between a man and a woman. (Nov 2006)
  • No affirmative action in state contracts nor colleges. (Nov 1998)
  • Opposed to Personal Income Tax. (Nov 2006)
  • $12B in federal economic stimulus as state block grants. (Jan 2008)

Tea Party Express Interviews Mike Rounds About U.S. Senate Race

Posted 11.8.13

During a recent interview with the Tea Party Express, Mike Rounds talked about the upcoming U.S. Senate Race. With record-low approval ratings for the President and Congress, Rounds discussed his plan for getting

On February 22, 2006, the state legislature of South Dakota passed an act banning all medical abortions except those necessary to save the mother’s life (see double effect). Rounds signed the act on March 6 and the ban was to have taken effect on July 1, 2006, but never did because of a court challenge. A referendum for a potential repeal of H.B. 1215 was placed on the ballot for the November 2006 statewide election due to a successful petition.[12] On May 30, over 38,000 signatures were filed, more than twice the 17,000 required to qualify. The law was ultimately repealed by voters on November 7, 2006, the day of Rounds’ re-election.[13]

2 full quotes on Abortion OR background on Abortion.

  • Abortion is wrong; reconsider Roe v. Wade. (Nov 2006)
  • Protect life under all circumstances; no embryo research. (Oct 2002)

 Resources: his website wiki

Mining & Canada … Latin America, First Nations, Mexico


Nickel Rim South Mine, near Sudbury, Ontario, ...

Nickel Rim South Mine, near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

  Guest PERSPECTIVE:

The good, the bad and the very, very ugly of Ontario‘s new Mining Act

By: Stan Sudol*
2012-11-08


Ontario’s first Mining Act was passed in 1869 with a significant revision in 1906. Since that time the Act has continuously evolved alongside technological and environmental changes and political and public demands.

So let’s start with some of the good news. There is a new on-line Mining Act Awareness Program that sooner or later every current and new explorer will have to take. A non-issue!

First Nations communities are now able to withdraw sites of Aboriginal significance so mining claims cannot be staked. This is a terrific idea eliminating potential conflict.

MNDM will also be conducting 44 workshops in strategically located in Aboriginal communities to help educate communities about the mineral sector.

Individuals or companies can now rehabilitate existing mine hazards they did not create and not be liable for pre-existing environmental issues.

Plans are also in the works to provide funding for Aboriginal Mineral Technical Officers who will be located in First Nations communities to deal with plans and permit applications. However, they have not decided on the number, and due to resource constraints, I fear too few will be hired.

Now let’s get to the bad and very, very ugly issues.

You will now be expected to fill out exploration plans and exploration permits that will highlight your activities over the next two and three years respectively. These plans and permits will be vetted by First Nations, surface rights owners and the general public.

In a perfect world, if no problems arise, it will take 30 or 50 days to get approval for these plans and permits. If there are problems, be prepared for significant and costly delays. And what is to prevent environmental groups from using this process to needlessly delay exploration activities that have very low impact on the environment?

In addition, the timeframe of these documents do not reflect the usual operating procedures of explorationists. Who knows where they will be drilling in two or three years? So any changes to these plans must go through the same 30 or 50 day process.

Expect a lot of additional paperwork and potential holdups for activities that have very little impact on the environment even if you have engaged with First Nations communities at an early stage.

Many small junior companies have only three to five employees and subcontract much of the field work to contractors and consultants.

Demanding investors, flow-through share funding time limits, spectacular or terrible drill results all require agility and rapid decision making to exploit opportunities as they occur.

Many small juniors and First Nations communities presently don’t have the capacity or the financial ability to handle the enormous increase in regulations and red tape.

Furthermore, this is an enormously risky time to implement these changes. Global financial instability has caused enormous volatility on stock markets putting downward pressure on stock values. This has been a brutal year to try to raise funds for juniors and many fear these changes will cause a significant migration to other provinces or international jurisdictions.

Now let’s touch upon the real elephant in the room that these changes do not address.

That issue is the additional payments to First Nations communities that are used purely as an “access or permission fee” for explorers to work on their claims. These fees are roughly averaging two or three per cent of exploration budgets. Many in the First Nations communities feel this is an acceptable form of “taxation” due to disruptions on their traditional territories or a way of establishing self-sufficiency.

This is a highly contentious issue throughout the exploration sector ranging from hardliners to the more pragmatic that have factored in these fees as an additional cost of doing business. However, everyone is concerned about the increasing escalation of these financial demands and if they become too high, some juniors may have no choice but to leave the province.

MNDM does not condone these fees yet is doing nothing about them.

So where do we go from here?

A vital first start is to find some consensus among ourselves that these additional payments have now become a cost of doing business. Unfortunately, the barn door is now open and you are not going to get those horses back in.

Industry and government reps should then meet with the First Nations leadership from the various tribal councils, NAN, Union of Ontario Indians and Grand Council of Treaty 3 to hammer out a consistent and transparent fee schedule.

Then ensure that government ministries will treat these “fees” as expenses that can be tax deductible.

A second valuable initiative is for MNDM to fund Aboriginal Mineral Technical Officers in most of the First Nations communities throughout northern Ontario. Some of these individuals should be able to be responsible for two or three reserves that may be very small or not in a currently active exploration area.

Train these individuals on how to efficiently deal with the plans and permits. In addition, they should also be responsible for educating their respective communities about the exploration and mining sectors.

And finally, since this knowledge/capacity does not currently exist in most First Nations communities, we must delay the mandatory requirements start up on April 1, 2013, for an addition six months or a year. During that time period, we could implement these initiatives and work out any potential bottlenecks or problems with the least amount of disruption.

The exploration industry was worth slightly over one billion dollars in 2011 and is the critical starting point for Ontario’s $11 billion mining sector.

It’s worth delaying the “mandatory” requirement of the new Mining Act regulations to get this right, especially during a cyclical downturn in the industry!

No one ever said this business was an easy one. There is enormous risk, but enormous gain as well.

However take heart, even though the entire global mining industry is slowing down, the commodity super cycle is still with us. Over the next few decades, as billions of people in China, India and the rest of the developing world become middle class consumers, the demand for metals will only continue to grow. Northern Ontario – including First Nations communities with economic challenges – can be the beneficiaries of this enormous global transformation, with the high-paying jobs that come from new mines.

But we need to meet, talk and come to a consensus that will benefit both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities.

The wealth is definitely there but we need to allow the prospectors and junior explorers access to the land to find these future mines that will eventually provide long-term, well-pay jobs to many Aboriginal communities.

*Stan Sudol is a Toronto-based communications consultant, speechwriter and columnist who blogs at www.republicofmining.com. These remarks are from a speech given at the Ontario Prospectors Association: 2012 Ontario Exploration & Geoscience Symposium in Sudbury Ontario, Nov. 6, 2012.