the senate ~ July 9 -13th Congress 2018 ~ the house


Wrap Up for Thursday, July 12, 2018
July 11, 2018 Wrap Up for Wednesday, July 11, 2018
July 10, 2018 Wrap Up for Tuesday, July 10, 2018
July 9, 2018 Wrap Up for Monday, July 9, 2018

House Activity  7/13

Last Floor Action:
11:23:42 A.M. – The House adjourned pursuant to a previous special order. The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 p.m. on July 16, 2018.

9:00:14 A.M. The House convened, starting a new legislative day.
9:00:20 A.M. The Speaker designated the Honorable Paul Mitchell to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
9:00:27 A.M. Today’s prayer was offered by Dr. Steven W. Schenewerk, Community Baptist Church, Winston, Oregon
9:01:59 A.M. SPEAKER’S APPROVAL OF THE JOURNAL – The Chair announced that he had examined the Journal of the last day’s proceedings and had approved it. Mr. Newhouse demanded that the question be put on agreeing to the Speaker’s approval of the Journal and by voice vote, the Chair announced that the ayes had prevailed. Mr. Newhouse objected to the voice vote based upon the absence of a quorum and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of the Speaker’s approval of the Journal until later in the legislative day.
9:02:47 A.M. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE – The Chair designated Ms. Barragan to lead the Members in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.
9:04:12 A.M. ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with one minute speeches, which by direction of the Chair, would be limited to 5 per side of the aisle.
9:15:09 A.M. H.R. 50 Considered under the provisions of rule H. Res. 985H.R. 50 — “To provide for additional safeguards with respect to imposing Federal mandates, and for other purposes.”
9:15:14 A.M. H.R. 50 Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 50 and H.R. 3281. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 50 under a structured rule and H.R. 3281 under a closed rule. Each measure is allowed one motion to recommit with or without instructions.
9:15:48 A.M. H.R. 50 House resolved itself into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 985 and Rule XVIII.
9:15:48 A.M. H.R. 50 The Speaker designated the Honorable Brian J. Mast to act as Chairman of the Committee.
9:16:41 A.M. H.R. 50 GENERAL DEBATE – The Committee of the Whole proceeded with one hour of general debate on H.R. 50.
9:58:50 A.M. H.R. 50 An amendment, offered by Mrs. Watson Coleman, numbered 1 printed in House Report 115-812 to strike section 5, which repeals the exclusion of independent agencies from reporting requirements.
9:59:24 A.M. H.R. 50 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 985, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Watson Coleman amendment No. 1.
10:05:22 A.M. H.R. 50 On agreeing to the Watson Coleman amendment; Failed by voice vote.
10:05:38 A.M. H.R. 50 An amendment, offered by Mr. Raskin, numbered 2 printed in House Report 115-812 to require a record of any consultation with any non-Federal party and any comments submitted by any non-Federal party to be posted on the agency website within five days after the consultation or date of submission.
10:06:14 A.M. H.R. 50 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 985, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Raskin amendment No. 2.
10:11:06 A.M. H.R. 50 On agreeing to the Raskin amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
10:11:27 A.M. H.R. 50 An amendment, offered by Mr. Connolly, numbered 4 printed in House Report 115-812 to provide for a sunset of amendments made to the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and the Congressional Budget Act if GDP growth fails to increase at average annual rate of five percent or more.
10:12:10 A.M. H.R. 50 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 985, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Connolly amendment No. 4.
10:16:38 A.M. H.R. 50 On agreeing to the Connolly amendment; Failed by voice vote.
10:17:05 A.M. H.R. 50 The House rose from the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 50.
10:17:32 A.M. H.R. 50 The previous question was ordered pursuant to the rule.
10:17:40 A.M. H.R. 50 The House adopted the amendment in the nature of a substitute as agreed to by the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.
10:18:07 A.M. H.R. 50 Mrs. Beatty moved to recommit with instructions to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.
10:18:16 A.M. H.R. 50 DEBATE – The House proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Beatty motion to recommit with instructions. The instructions contained in the motion seek to require the bill to be reported back to the House with an amendment to add a new section to the bill to not restrict any Federal agency mandate or action to protect students and children from a person who has been convicted in any court of a sex offense against a minor; prevent domestic violence; prevent rape or sexual assault; and require criminal background checks for schools or other employees.
10:26:02 A.M. H.R. 50 The previous question on the motion to recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
10:53:14 A.M. H.R. 50 On motion to recommit with instructions Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 180 – 219 (Roll no. 327).
11:00:42 A.M. H.R. 50 On passage Passed by recorded vote: 230 – 168 (Roll no. 328).
11:00:44 A.M. H.R. 50 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
11:00:52 A.M. UNFINISHED BUSINESS – The Chair announced that the unfinished business was on the Speaker’s approval of the Journal and put the question de novo.
11:01:08 A.M. On approving the Journal Agreed to by voice vote.
11:04:21 A.M. Mr. Womack filed a report from the Committee on The Budget on H. Con. Res. 128.
11:05:09 A.M. Mr. Womack asked unanimous consent that when the House adjourns on Friday, July 13, 2018, it adjourn to meet on Monday, July 16, 2018, when it shall convene at noon for morning-hour debate and 2 p.m. for legislative business. Agreed to without objection.
11:06:22 A.M. ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with further one minute speeches.
11:23:32 A.M. Mr. Poe (TX) moved that the House do now adjourn.
11:23:41 A.M. On motion to adjourn Agreed to by voice vote.
11:23:42 A.M. The House adjourned pursuant to a previous special order. The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 p.m. on July 16, 2018.

House Activity 7/12

10:00:00 A.M. The House convened, starting a new legislative day.
10:00:17 A.M. The Speaker designated the Honorable Scott DesJarlais to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
10:00:50 A.M. MORNING-HOUR DEBATE – The House proceeded with Morning-Hour Debate. At the conclusion of Morning-Hour, the House will recess until 12:00 p.m. for the start of legislative business.
10:45:11 A.M. The Speaker announced that the House do now recess. The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 P.M. today.
12:00:48 P.M. The House convened, returning from a recess continuing the legislative day of July 12.
12:00:50 P.M. Today’s prayer was offered by Rev. J. Josh Smith, Prince Avenue Baptist Church, Athens, GA
12:01:37 P.M. The Speaker announced approval of the Journal. Pursuant to clause 1, rule I, the Journal stands approved.
12:01:39 P.M. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE – The Chair designated Mr. Gianforte to lead the Members in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.
12:03:29 P.M. ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with one minute speeches which by direction of the Chair, would be limited to 15 per side of the aisle.
12:18:34 P.M. H. Res. 989 Considered as privileged matter. H. Res. 989 — “Providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 6237) to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 2018 and 2019 for intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the United States Government, the Community Management Account, and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System, and for other purposes.”
12:20:45 P.M. H. Res. 989 DEBATE – The House proceeded with one hour of debate on H. Res. 989.
1:28:20 P.M. H. Res. 989 On ordering the previous question Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: 229 – 182 (Roll no. 322).
1:36:49 P.M. H. Res. 989 On agreeing to the resolution Agreed to by recorded vote: 235 – 178 (Roll no. 323).
1:36:52 P.M. H. Res. 989 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
1:36:53 P.M. H.R. 6237 Considered under the provisions of rule H. Res. 989H.R. 6237 — “To authorize appropriations for fiscal years 2018 and 2019 for intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the United States Government, the Community Management Account, and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System, and for other purposes.”
1:36:58 P.M. H.R. 6237 Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 6237 with 1 hour of general debate. Previous question shall be considered as ordered without intervening motions except motion to recommit with or without instructions. Measure will be considered read. Specified amendments are in order.
1:37:40 P.M. H.R. 6237 House resolved itself into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 989 and Rule XVIII.
1:37:40 P.M. H.R. 6237 The Speaker designated the Honorable Randy K. Weber, Sr. to act as Chairman of the Committee.
1:38:54 P.M. H.R. 6237 GENERAL DEBATE – The Committee of the Whole proceeded with one hour of general debate on H.R. 6237.
2:06:29 P.M. H.R. 6237 An amendment, offered by Mr. Schiff, numbered 1 printed in House Report 115-815to add Russian to the list of the languages in Sec. 1501.
2:06:47 P.M. H.R. 6237 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 989, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Schiff amendment No. 1.
2:12:25 P.M. H.R. 6237 On agreeing to the Schiff amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
2:12:52 P.M. H.R. 6237 An amendment, offered by Mr. Schneider, numbered 2 printed in House Report 115-815 to amend Sec. 1503 to include a list of foreign state or foreign nonstate actors involved in the threats to election campaigns for Federal offices.
2:13:09 P.M. H.R. 6237 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 989, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Schneider amendment No. 2.
2:16:13 P.M. H.R. 6237 On agreeing to the Schneider amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
2:16:47 P.M. H.R. 6237 An amendment, offered by Ms. Jackson Lee, numbered 3 printed in House Report 115-815 to amend the Sense of Congress already in the bill on the importance of re-review of security clearances held by individuals by adding consideration of whether the security clearance holders association or sympathy with persons or organizations that advocate, threaten, or use force or violence, or any other illegal or unconstitutional means, in an effort to prevent others from exercising their rights under the Constitution or laws of the United States or of any state, including but not limited to race, religion, national origin, or disability.
2:17:06 P.M. H.R. 6237 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 989, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Jackson Lee amendment No. 3.
2:23:31 P.M. H.R. 6237 On agreeing to the Jackson Lee amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
2:24:05 P.M. H.R. 6237 An amendment, offered by Mr. Vargas, numbered 4 printed in House Report 115-815 to add the use of virtual currencies to section 1505 to ensure it is included in the assessment of threat finance.
2:24:22 P.M. H.R. 6237 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 989, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Vargas amendment No. 4.
2:28:46 P.M. H.R. 6237 On agreeing to the Vargas amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
2:29:22 P.M. H.R. 6237 An amendment, offered by Mrs. Torres, numbered 5 printed in House Report 115-815 to direct Director of National Intelligence, in coordination with the Assistant Secretary of State for Intelligence and Research and the Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Intelligence and Analysis, to produce a national intelligence estimate of the revenue sources of the North Korean regime.
2:29:41 P.M. H.R. 6237 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 989, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Torres amendment No. 5.
2:34:20 P.M. H.R. 6237 On agreeing to the Torres amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
2:35:00 P.M. H.R. 6237 An amendment, offered by Mr. Hastings, numbered 6 printed in House Report 115-815 to direct the Director of National Intelligence to create and implement a plan that expands the recruitment efforts of all intelligence agencies geographic parameters used in recruitment efforts so that rural and other underserved regions across the nation are more fully represented in such efforts.
2:35:25 P.M. H.R. 6237 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 989, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Hastings amendment No. 6.
2:40:41 P.M. H.R. 6237 On agreeing to the Hastings amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
2:41:10 P.M. H.R. 6237 An amendment, offered by Mr. Schneider, numbered 7 printed in House Report 115-815 to direct the DNI to report on Iran’s support for proxy forces in Syria and Lebanon, including Hizballah, and an assessment of the threat posed to Israel and other U.S. regional allies.
2:41:26 P.M. H.R. 6237 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 989, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Schneider amendment No. 7.
2:45:09 P.M. H.R. 6237 On agreeing to the Schneider amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
2:45:29 P.M. H.R. 6237 An amendment, offered by Mr. Bera, numbered 8 printed in House Report 115-815to require a briefing to relevant Congressional committees on the anticipated geopolitical effects of emerging infectious disease and pandemics, and their implications on the national security of the United States.
2:45:48 P.M. H.R. 6237 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 989, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Bera amendment No. 8.
2:50:49 P.M. H.R. 6237 On agreeing to the Bera amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
2:51:08 P.M. H.R. 6237 An amendment, offered by Mr. Kennedy, numbered 9 printed in House Report 115-815 to require the Director of National Intelligence to submit a report on the potential establishment of the “Foreign Malign Influence Response Center,” comprised of analysts from all elements of the intelligence community, to provide comprehensive assessment of foreign efforts to influence United States political processes and elections.
2:51:26 P.M. H.R. 6237 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 989, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Kennedy amendment No. 9.
2:54:11 P.M. H.R. 6237 On agreeing to the Kennedy amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
2:54:47 P.M. H.R. 6237 An amendment, offered by Miss Rice (NY), numbered 10 printed in House Report 115-815 to require the Director of National Intelligence to report on the possible exploitation of virtual currencies by terrorist actors.
2:55:06 P.M. H.R. 6237 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 989, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Rice (NY) amendment No. 10.
2:59:49 P.M. H.R. 6237 On agreeing to the Rice (NY) amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
3:00:22 P.M. H.R. 6237 An amendment, offered by Mr. Lipinski, numbered 11 printed in House Report 115-815 to require an annual report from the Director of National Intelligence describing Iranian expenditures on military and terrorist activities outside the country, such as on Hezbollah, Houthi rebels in Yemen, Hamas, and proxy forces in Iraq and Syria.
3:01:04 P.M. H.R. 6237 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 989, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Lipinski amendment No. 11.
3:04:59 P.M. H.R. 6237 On agreeing to the Lipinski amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
3:05:19 P.M. H.R. 6237 An amendment, offered by Mr. Davidson, numbered 12 printed in House Report 115-815 to enhance oversight by augmenting existing semiannual reporting requirements regarding disciplinary actions.
3:05:49 P.M. H.R. 6237 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 989, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Davidson amendment No. 12.
3:09:52 P.M. H.R. 6237 On agreeing to the Davidson amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
3:10:34 P.M. H.R. 6237 The House rose from the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 6237.
3:11:06 P.M. H.R. 6237 The previous question was ordered pursuant to the rule.
3:11:20 P.M. H.R. 6237 The House adopted the amendment in the nature of a substitute as agreed to by the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.
3:12:19 P.M. H.R. 6237 POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At conclusion of debate on H.R. 6237, the Chair put the question on passage of the bill, and by voice vote announced that the ayes had prevailed. Mr. Nunes demanded the yeas and nays and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of passage until later in the legislative day.
3:14:05 P.M. H.R. 3281 Considered under the provisions of rule H. Res. 985H.R. 3281 — “To authorize the Secretary of the Interior to facilitate the transfer to non-Federal ownership of appropriate reclamation projects or facilities, and for other purposes.”
3:14:10 P.M. H.R. 3281 Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 50 and H.R. 3281. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 50 under a structured rule and H.R. 3281 under a closed rule. Each measure is allowed one motion to recommit with or without instructions.
3:14:53 P.M. H.R. 3281 DEBATE – The House proceeded with one hour of debate on H.R. 3281.
3:56:04 P.M. H.R. 3281 The previous question was ordered pursuant to the rule.
3:56:31 P.M. H.R. 3281 Mr. Huffman moved to recommit with instructions to the Committee on Natural Resources.
3:56:50 P.M. H.R. 3281 DEBATE – The House proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Huffman motion to recommit with instructions. The instructions contained in the motion seek to require the bill to be reported back to the House with an amendment to add a section at the end of the bill entitled “Prohibition Against Conflict of Interest”.
4:00:41 P.M. H.R. 3281 The previous question on the motion to recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
4:01:08 P.M. H.R. 3281 POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Huffman motion to recommit with instructions, the Chair put the question on the motion to recommit, and by voice vote announced that the noes had prevailed. Mr. Huffman demanded the yeas and nays, and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the motion to recommit until later in the legislative day.
4:01:20 P.M. The Speaker announced that the House do now recess. The next meeting is subject to the call of the Chair.
4:45:15 P.M. The House convened, returning from a recess continuing the legislative day of July 12.
4:45:23 P.M. UNFINISHED BUSINESS – The Chair announced that the unfinished business was the question on the motion to recommit on H.R. 3281, which had been debated earlier and on which further proceedings had been postponed.
4:46:08 P.M. H.R. 3281 Considered as unfinished business. H.R. 3281 — “To authorize the Secretary of the Interior to facilitate the transfer to non-Federal ownership of appropriate reclamation projects or facilities, and for other purposes.”
5:16:32 P.M. H.R. 3281 On motion to recommit with instructions Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 187 – 230 (Roll no. 324).
5:24:30 P.M. H.R. 3281 On passage Passed by recorded vote: 233 – 184 (Roll no. 325).
5:24:32 P.M. H.R. 3281 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
5:24:41 P.M. H.R. 6237 Considered as unfinished business. H.R. 6237 — “To authorize appropriations for fiscal years 2018 and 2019 for intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the United States Government, the Community Management Account, and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System, and for other purposes.”
5:32:00 P.M. H.R. 6237 On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 363 – 54 (Roll no. 326).
5:32:02 P.M. H.R. 6237 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
5:33:49 P.M. MOMENT OF SILENCE – The House observed a moment of silence in memory of the servicemember who lost their life in Jordan.
5:37:23 P.M. ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with further one minute speeches.
5:47:19 P.M. SPECIAL ORDER SPEECHES – The House has concluded all anticipated legislative business and has proceeded to Special Order speeches.
7:04:50 P.M. Mr. Pascrell moved that the House do now adjourn.
7:04:53 P.M. On motion to adjourn Agreed to by voice vote.
7:04:54 P.M. The House adjourned. The next meeting is scheduled for 9:00 a.m. on July 13, 2018

House Activity 7/11

10:00:04 A.M. The House convened, starting a new legislative day.
10:00:09 A.M. The Speaker designated the Honorable Roger W. Marshall to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
10:00:21 A.M. MORNING-HOUR DEBATE – The House proceeded with Morning-Hour Debate. At the conclusion of Morning-Hour, the House will recess until 12:00 p.m. for the start of legislative business.
11:03:21 A.M. The Speaker announced that the House do now recess. The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 P.M. today.
12:00:04 P.M. The House convened, returning from a recess continuing the legislative day of July 11.
12:00:08 P.M. Today’s prayer was offered by Rev. John Hill, Flint United Methodist Church, Alexander City, Alabama
12:01:36 P.M. The Speaker announced approval of the Journal. Pursuant to clause 1, rule I, the Journal stands approved.
12:01:38 P.M. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE – The Chair designated Ms. Esty of CT to lead the Members in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.
12:02:08 P.M. MOMENT OF SILENCE – The House observed a moment of silence in honor of those who have been killed or wounded in service to our country and all those who serve and their families.
12:03:36 P.M. ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with one minute speeches, which by direction of the Chair, would be limited to 15 per side of the aisle.
12:24:41 P.M. The House received a message from the Clerk. Pursuant to the permission granted in Clause 2(h) of Rule II of the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives, the Clerk notified the House that she received the following message from the Secretary of the Senate on July 11, 2018, at 9:13 a.m.: that the Senate agreed to a Conference on H.R. 5515.
12:25:04 P.M. The House received a message from the Clerk. Pursuant to the permission granted in Clause 2(h) of Rule II of the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives, the Clerk notified the House that she received the following message from the Secretary of the Senate on July 11, 2018, at 11:20 a.m.: that the Senate passed S. Con. Res. 41.
12:25:25 P.M. H. Res. 985 Considered as privileged matter. H. Res. 985 — “Providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 50) to provide for additional safeguards with respect to imposing Federal mandates, and for other purposes, and providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 3281) to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to facilitate the transfer to non-Federal ownership of appropriate reclamation projects or facilities, and for other purposes.”
12:28:25 P.M. H. Res. 985 DEBATE – The House proceeded with one hour of debate on H. Res. 985.
1:02:30 P.M. H. Res. 985 POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on H. Res. 985, the Chair put the question on ordering the previous question, and by voice vote, announced that the ayes had prevailed. Mrs. Torres demanded the yeas and nays and the Chair postponed further proceedings on ordering the previous question until a time to be announced.
1:03:23 P.M. H. Res. 965 Considered as privileged matter. H. Res. 965 — “Providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 200) to amend the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act to provide flexibility for fishery managers and stability for fishermen, and for other purposes.”
1:05:27 P.M. H. Res. 965 DEBATE – The House proceeded with one hour of debate on H. Res. 965.
2:10:03 P.M. H. Res. 965 On ordering the previous question Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: 225 – 186 (Roll no. 316).
2:20:05 P.M. H. Res. 965 On agreeing to the resolution Agreed to by recorded vote: 227 – 184 (Roll no. 317).
2:20:07 P.M. H. Res. 965 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
2:21:23 P.M. MOMENT OF SILENCE – The House observed a moment of silence in memory of the victims of the attack in Annapolis, MD.
2:24:19 P.M. UNFINISHED BUSINESS – The Chair announced that the unfinished business was the question on ordering the previous question on H. Res. 985, which was debated earlier and on which further proceedings were postponed.
2:24:25 P.M. H. Res. 985 Considered as unfinished business. H. Res. 985 — “Providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 50) to provide for additional safeguards with respect to imposing Federal mandates, and for other purposes, and providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 3281) to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to facilitate the transfer to non-Federal ownership of appropriate reclamation projects or facilities, and for other purposes.”
2:31:19 P.M. H. Res. 985 On ordering the previous question Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: 228 – 184 (Roll no. 318).
2:38:50 P.M. H. Res. 985 On agreeing to the resolution Agreed to by recorded vote: 229 – 183 (Roll no. 319).
2:38:52 P.M. H. Res. 985 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
2:38:53 P.M. H.R. 1898 ASSUMING FIRST SPONSORSHIP – Mrs. Blackburn asked unanimous consent that she may hereafter be the first sponsor of H.R. 1898, a bill originally introduced by Representative Meehan, for the purpose of adding cosponsors and requesting reprintings pursuant to clause 7 of rule XII. Agreed to without objection.
2:40:13 P.M. H. Res. 256 Mr. Royce (CA) asked unanimous consent to discharge from committee and consider.
2:40:42 P.M. H. Res. 256 Considered by unanimous consent. H. Res. 256 — “Expressing support for the countries of Eastern Europe and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.”
2:42:03 P.M. H. Res. 256 An amendment, offered by Mr. Royce (CA), to strike all after the resolving clause and insert new text.
2:42:25 P.M. H. Res. 256 On agreeing to the Royce (CA) amendment; Agreed to without objection.
2:42:39 P.M. H. Res. 256 On agreeing to the resolution Agreed to without objection.
2:42:40 P.M. H. Res. 256 An amendment, offered by Mr. Royce (CA), to strike the preamble and insert new text.
2:42:49 P.M. H. Res. 256 On agreeing to the Royce (CA) amendment; Agreed to without objection.
2:43:05 P.M. H. Res. 256 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
2:43:06 P.M. H. Res. 256 The title of the measure was amended. Agreed to without objection.
2:43:15 P.M. The Speaker announced that votes on suspensions, if ordered, will be postponed until a time to be announced.
2:44:22 P.M. H.R. 2075 Mr. McClintock moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. H.R. 2075 — “To adjust the eastern boundary of the Deschutes Canyon-Steelhead Falls Wilderness Study Area in the State of Oregon to facilitate fire prevention and response activities in order to protect adjacent private property, and for other purposes.”
2:44:37 P.M. H.R. 2075 Considered under suspension of the rules.
2:44:38 P.M. H.R. 2075 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 2075.
2:56:29 P.M. H.R. 2075 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
2:56:32 P.M. H.R. 2075 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
2:56:33 P.M. H.R. 2075 The title of the measure was amended. Agreed to without objection.
2:56:58 P.M. The House received a message from the Senate. The Senate agreed to a Conference on H.R. 5895.
2:57:24 P.M. H.R. 200 Considered under the provisions of rule H. Res. 965H.R. 200 — “To amend the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act to provide flexibility for fishery managers and stability for fishermen, and for other purposes.”
2:57:29 P.M. H.R. 200 Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 200. Motion to recommit with or without instructions allowed. The resolution makes in order as original text for the purpose of amendment, the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the Committee on Natural Resources now printed in the bill. The resolution makes in order only those amendments printed in the Rules Committee report.
2:57:39 P.M. H.R. 200 House resolved itself into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 965 and Rule XVIII.
2:57:40 P.M. H.R. 200 The Speaker designated the Honorable Mike Bost to act as Chairman of the Committee.
2:58:35 P.M. H.R. 200 GENERAL DEBATE – The Committee of the Whole proceeded with one hour of general debate on H.R. 200.
3:55:47 P.M. H.R. 200 An amendment, offered by Mr. Young (AK), numbered 1 printed in House Report 115-786 to strike sections 302(c) and 307, and modifies sections 205, 207, 304, 30 6, 406, and 408. The amendment also includes a new section regarding voting procedures for the Western Alaska Community Development Quota Program’s administrative panel.
3:56:03 P.M. H.R. 200 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 965, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Young(AK) amendment No. 1.
4:03:17 P.M. H.R. 200 On agreeing to the Young (AK) amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
4:03:29 P.M. H.R. 200 An amendment, offered by Mr. Courtney, numbered 2 printed in House Report 115-786 to create an industry-based pilot trawl survey for the New England and Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council regions.
4:03:47 P.M. H.R. 200 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 965, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Courtney amendment No. 2.
4:08:53 P.M. H.R. 200 On agreeing to the Courtney amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
4:09:02 P.M. H.R. 200 An amendment, offered by Mr. Langevin, numbered 3 printed in House Report 115-786 to provide voting representation for Rhode Island on the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC).
4:09:21 P.M. H.R. 200 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 965, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Langevin amendment No. 3.
4:16:17 P.M. H.R. 200 On agreeing to the Langevin amendment Failed by voice vote.
4:16:31 P.M. H.R. 200 An amendment, offered by Mr. Huffman, numbered 4 printed in House Report 115-786 to ensure that rebuilding plans are successful in rebuilding overfished fish stocks.
4:16:56 P.M. H.R. 200 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 965, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Huffman amendment No. 4.
4:23:27 P.M. H.R. 200 On agreeing to the Huffman amendment; Failed by voice vote.
4:24:00 P.M. H.R. 200 An amendment, offered by Mr. Webster (FL), numbered 5 printed in House Report 115-786 to waive compensatory mitigation requirements for maintenance dredging projects in certain inland waterways, inlets, or harbors.
4:24:20 P.M. H.R. 200 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 965, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Webster amendment No. 5.
4:31:28 P.M. H.R. 200 On agreeing to the Webster (FL) amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
4:31:40 P.M. H.R. 200 An amendment, offered by Mr. Graves (LA), numbered 6 printed in House Report 115-786 to require the Comptroller General to submit a report to Congress on resource rent of LAPPs in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Fishery Management Councils, ways to the Treasury can reclaim that resource rent, and ways to eliminate fiduciary conflicts of interest in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Councils.
4:32:08 P.M. H.R. 200 Graves (LA) amendment; modified by unanimous consent.
4:32:20 P.M. H.R. 200 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 965, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Graves (LA) amendment No. 6, as modified.
4:40:05 P.M. H.R. 200 On agreeing to the Graves (LA) amendment; as modified Agreed to by voice vote.
4:40:31 P.M. H.R. 200 An amendment, offered by Mr. Keating, numbered 7 printed in House Report 115-786 to direct the Secretary to submit a plan to establish fully operational electronic monitoring and reporting procedures for the Northeast Multispecies Fishery.
4:40:48 P.M. H.R. 200 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 965, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Keating amendment No. 7.
4:44:48 P.M. H.R. 200 On agreeing to the Keating amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
4:45:00 P.M. H.R. 200 An amendment, offered by Mr. Poliquin, numbered 8 printed in House Report 115-786 to require NOAA to conduct a study on all fees it charges the lobster industry and report those findings to Congress.
4:45:19 P.M. H.R. 200 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 965, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Poliquin amendment No. 8.
4:50:55 P.M. H.R. 200 On agreeing to the Poliquin amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
4:51:20 P.M. H.R. 200 An amendment, offered by Mr. Zeldin, numbered 9 printed in House Report 115-786 to lift the ban on striped bass fishing in the Block Island transit zone between Montauk, NY and Block Island, RI.
4:51:39 P.M. H.R. 200 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 965, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Zeldin amendment No. 9.
5:00:24 P.M. H.R. 200 On agreeing to the Zeldin amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
5:00:36 P.M. H.R. 200 An amendment, offered by Mr. Keating, numbered 10 printed in House Report 115-786 to direct the Secretary to use funds collected from penalties and fines for monitoring in addition to traditional enforcement activities.
5:01:03 P.M. H.R. 200 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 965, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Keating amendment No. 10.
5:04:30 P.M. H.R. 200 On agreeing to the Keating amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
5:05:18 P.M. H.R. 200 An amendment, offered by Mr. Gaetz, numbered 11 printed in House Report 115-786 to reward the elimination of lionfish from United States waters by allowing individuals to exchange lionfish for tags authorizing fishing for certain species in addition to the number of such species otherwise authorized to be taken by such individuals.
5:06:58 P.M. H.R. 200 Gaetz amendment; modified by unanimous consent.
5:07:23 P.M. H.R. 200 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 965, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Gaetz amendment No. 11, as modified.
5:11:58 P.M. H.R. 200 On agreeing to the Gaetz amendment; as modified Agreed to by voice vote.
5:12:49 P.M. H.R. 200 The House rose from the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 200.
5:13:09 P.M. H.R. 200 The previous question was ordered pursuant to the rule.
5:13:17 P.M. H.R. 200 The House adopted the amendment in the nature of a substitute as agreed to by the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.
5:14:01 P.M. H.R. 200 Mr. Gomez moved to recommit with instructions to the Committee on Natural Resources.
5:14:17 P.M. H.R. 200 DEBATE – The House proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Gomez motion to recommit with instructions, pending a reservation of a point of order. The instructions contained in the motion seek to require the bill to be reported back to the House with an amendment to impose unilateral tariffs by other countries on any US seafood exports or unilateral tariffs imposed by any country on materials necessary for the economic viability of the US fishing industry. Subsequently, the reservation was withdrawn.
5:18:40 P.M. H.R. 200 The previous question on the motion to recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
5:46:44 P.M. H.R. 200 On motion to recommit with instructions Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 187 – 228 (Roll no. 320).
5:54:24 P.M. H.R. 200 On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 222 – 193 (Roll no. 321).
5:54:26 P.M. H.R. 200 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
5:54:44 P.M. H.R. 200 UNANIMOUS CONSENT REQUEST – Mr. Young (AK) asked unanimous consent that the engrossment of the bill, H.R. 200, the Clerk be authorized to make technical corrections and conforming changes to the bill. The technical corrections was place at the desk and reads as follows: Page 14, line 15, strike ”’including”’. Agreed to without objection.
5:55:28 P.M. Mr. Collins (GA) filed a report from the Committee on Rules on H. Res. 989.
5:57:05 P.M. ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with further one minute speeches.
6:10:00 P.M. SPECIAL ORDER SPEECHES – The House has concluded all anticipated legislative business and has proceeded to Special Order speeches.
7:28:08 P.M. Mr. Gohmert moved that the House do now adjourn.
7:28:14 P.M. On motion to adjourn Agreed to by voice vote.
7:28:15 P.M. The House adjourned. The next meeting is scheduled for 10:00 a.m. on July 12, 2018.

House Activity 7/10

Time Bill Activity
12:00:23 P.M. The House convened, starting a new legislative day.
12:00:37 P.M. The Speaker designated the Honorable Francis Rooney to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
12:00:53 P.M. MORNING-HOUR DEBATE – The House proceeded with Morning-Hour Debate. At the conclusion of Morning-Hour, the House will recess until 2:00 p.m. for the start of legislative business.
12:06:23 P.M. The Speaker announced that the House do now recess. The next meeting is scheduled for 2:00 P.M. today.
2:00:02 P.M. The House convened, returning from a recess continuing the legislative day of July 10.
2:00:04 P.M. Today’s prayer was offered by the House Chaplain, Rev. Patrick J. Conroy.
2:01:28 P.M. The Speaker announced approval of the Journal. Pursuant to clause 1, rule I, the Journal stands approved.
2:01:30 P.M. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE – The Chair designated Ms. Foxx to lead the Members in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.
2:02:00 P.M. ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with one minute speeches.
2:11:20 P.M. The House received a message from the Clerk. Pursuant to the permission granted in Clause 2(h) of Rule II of the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives, the Clerk notified the House that she had received a message from the Secretary of the Senate on July 10, 2018 at 12:12 p.m. stating that that body had made an appointment to the Commission on Social Impact Partnerships.
2:11:37 P.M. The Speaker announced that the House do now recess. The next meeting is subject to the call of the Chair.
2:30:53 P.M. The House convened, returning from a recess continuing the legislative day of July 10.
2:31:20 P.M. The Speaker announced that votes on suspensions, if ordered, will be postponed until the conclusion of general debate on all suspensions.
2:31:44 P.M. H.R. 5729 Mr. Katko moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. H.R. 5729 — “To restrict the department in which the Coast Guard is operating from implementing any rule requiring the use of biometric readers for biometric transportation security cards until after submission to Congress of the results of an assessment of the effectiveness of the transportation security card program.”
2:31:55 P.M. H.R. 5729 Considered under suspension of the rules.
2:31:56 P.M. H.R. 5729 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 5729.
2:40:07 P.M. H.R. 5729 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
2:40:12 P.M. H.R. 5729 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
2:40:58 P.M. H.R. 6139 Mr. Huizenga moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill. H.R. 6139 — “To require the Securities and Exchange Commission to carry out a study to evaluate the issues affecting the provision of and reliance upon investment research into small issuers.”
2:41:08 P.M. H.R. 6139 Considered under suspension of the rules.
2:41:10 P.M. H.R. 6139 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 6139.
2:52:10 P.M. H.R. 6139 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill Agreed to by voice vote.
2:52:11 P.M. H.R. 6139 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
2:52:27 P.M. H.R. 1861 Mr. Huizenga moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill. H.R. 1861 — “To award a Congressional Gold Medal in honor of Lawrence Eugene “Larry” Doby in recognition of his achievements and contributions to American major league athletics, civil rights, and the Armed Forces during World War II.”
2:52:42 P.M. H.R. 1861 Considered under suspension of the rules.
2:52:45 P.M. H.R. 1861 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 1861.
3:10:09 P.M. H.R. 1861 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill Agreed to by voice vote.
3:10:11 P.M. H.R. 1861 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
3:10:14 P.M. H.R. 5749 Mr. Huizenga moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. H.R. 5749— “To require the appropriate Federal banking agencies to increase the risk-sensitivity of the capital treatment of certain centrally cleared options, and for other purposes.”
3:10:30 P.M. H.R. 5749 Considered under suspension of the rules.
3:10:32 P.M. H.R. 5749 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 5749.
3:24:36 P.M. H.R. 5749 At the conclusion of debate, the Yeas and Nays were demanded and ordered. Pursuant to the provisions of clause 8, rule XX, the Chair announced that further proceedings on the motion would be postponed.
3:25:02 P.M. H.R. 5877 Mr. Huizenga moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. H.R. 5877— “To amend the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 to allow for the registration of venture exchanges, and for other purposes.”
3:25:11 P.M. H.R. 5877 Considered under suspension of the rules.
3:25:13 P.M. H.R. 5877 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 5877.
3:38:18 P.M. H.R. 5877 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
3:38:20 P.M. H.R. 5877 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
3:38:44 P.M. H.R. 5953 Mr. Huizenga moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill. H.R. 5953 — “To provide regulatory relief to charitable organizations that provide housing assistance, and for other purposes.”
3:38:54 P.M. H.R. 5953 Considered under suspension of the rules.
3:38:55 P.M. H.R. 5953 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 5953.
3:53:30 P.M. H.R. 5953 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill Agreed to by voice vote.
3:53:32 P.M. H.R. 5953 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
3:53:49 P.M. H.R. 4537 Mr. Huizenga moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. H.R. 4537— “To preserve the State-based system of insurance regulation and provide greater oversight of and transparency on international insurance standards setting processes, and for other purposes.”
3:54:07 P.M. H.R. 4537 Considered under suspension of the rules.
3:54:10 P.M. H.R. 4537 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 4537.
4:07:55 P.M. H.R. 4537 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
4:07:56 P.M. H.R. 4537 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
4:08:10 P.M. H.R. 5793 Mr. Huizenga moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill. H.R. 5793 — “To authorize the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development to carry out a housing choice voucher mobility demonstration to encourage families receiving such voucher assistance to move to lower-poverty areas and expand access to opportunity areas.”
4:08:23 P.M. H.R. 5793 Considered under suspension of the rules.
4:08:24 P.M. H.R. 5793 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 5793.
4:28:14 P.M. H.R. 5793 At the conclusion of debate, the Yeas and Nays were demanded and ordered. Pursuant to the provisions of clause 8, rule XX, the Chair announced that further proceedings on the motion would be postponed.
4:28:43 P.M. H.R. 5970 Mr. Huizenga moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. H.R. 5970— “To require the Securities and Exchange Commission to implement rules simplifying the quarterly financial reporting regime.”
4:29:04 P.M. H.R. 5970 Considered under suspension of the rules.
4:29:06 P.M. H.R. 5970 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 5970.
4:42:34 P.M. H.R. 5970 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
4:42:36 P.M. H.R. 5970 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
4:42:37 P.M. H.R. 5970 The title of the measure was amended. Agreed to without objection.
4:43:35 P.M. H.R. 5626 Mr. Royce (CA) moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. H.R. 5626 — “To amend the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 to require the Secretary of State to report on intercountry adoptions from countries which have significantly reduced adoption rates involving immigration to the United States, and for other purposes.”
4:43:51 P.M. H.R. 5626 Considered under suspension of the rules.
4:43:53 P.M. H.R. 5626 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 5626.
4:58:17 P.M. H.R. 5626 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
4:58:20 P.M. H.R. 5626 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
4:58:29 P.M. H. Res. 644 Mr. Royce (CA) moved to suspend the rules and agree to the resolution, as amended. H. Res. 644 — “Strongly condemning the slave auctions of migrants and refugees in Libya, and for other purposes.”
4:58:37 P.M. H. Res. 644 Considered under suspension of the rules.
4:58:39 P.M. H. Res. 644 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H. Res. 644.
5:12:06 P.M. H. Res. 644 On motion to suspend the rules and agree to the resolution, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
5:12:07 P.M. H. Res. 644 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
5:12:15 P.M. H. Res. 644 The title of the measure was amended. Agreed to without objection.
5:13:03 P.M. H.R. 2259 Mr. Poe (TX) moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. H.R. 2259— “To amend the Peace Corps Act to expand services and benefits for volunteers, and for other purposes.”
5:13:13 P.M. H.R. 2259 Considered under suspension of the rules.
5:13:14 P.M. H.R. 2259 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 2259.
5:33:58 P.M. H.R. 2259 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
5:34:00 P.M. H.R. 2259 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
5:34:18 P.M. The Speaker announced that the House do now recess. The next meeting is scheduled for approximately 6:30 P.M. today.
6:29:48 P.M. The House convened, returning from a recess continuing the legislative day of July 10.
6:29:53 P.M. Mr. Collins (GA) filed a report from the Committee on Rules on H. Res. 985.
6:30:30 P.M. UNFINISHED BUSINESS – The Chair announced that the unfinished business was on motions to suspend the rules, which were debated earlier and on which further proceedings had been postponed.
6:31:00 P.M. H.R. 5793 Considered as unfinished business. H.R. 5793 — “To authorize the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development to carry out a housing choice voucher mobility demonstration to encourage families receiving such voucher assistance to move to lower-poverty areas and expand access to opportunity areas.”
6:55:39 P.M. H.R. 5793 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (2/3 required): 368 – 19 (Roll no. 314).
6:55:40 P.M. H.R. 5793 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
6:57:38 P.M. The House received a message from the Clerk. The Clerk transmitted to the House a facsimile copy of a letter received from Mr. Keith Ingram, Director of Elections, Office of the Secretary of State of Texas, indicating that, at the Special Election held June 30, 2018, the Honorable Michael Cloud was elected Representative to Congress for the 27th Congressional District, State of Texas.
6:58:39 P.M. ADMINISTERING THE OATH OF OFFICE – Representative-elect Michael Cloud from the 27th Congressional District, State of Texas, presented himself in the well of the House to take the Oath of Office administered by the Speaker of the House.
7:04:00 P.M. ADJUSTED WHOLE NUMBER OF THE HOUSE – Under clause 5(d) of rule 20, the Chair announced to the House that, in light of the administration of the Oath of Office to the gentleman from Texas, the whole number of the House is 429.
7:04:43 P.M. H.R. 5749 Considered as unfinished business. H.R. 5749 — “To require the appropriate Federal banking agencies to increase the risk-sensitivity of the capital treatment of certain centrally cleared options, and for other purposes.”
7:12:17 P.M. H.R. 5749 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (2/3 required): 385 – 0 (Roll no. 315).
7:12:18 P.M. H.R. 5749 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
7:12:22 P.M. H.R. 5749 The title of the measure was amended. Agreed to without objection.
7:12:40 P.M. Mr. Goodlatte filed a report from the Committee on Judiciary on H. Res. 938.
7:13:36 P.M. H. Res. 928 PERMISSION TO FILE SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT – Mr. Goodlatte asked unanimous consent that the Committee on the Judiciary be authorized to file a supplemental report on H. Res. 928. Agreed to without objection.
7:13:49 P.M. The Speaker announced that votes on suspensions, if ordered, will be postponed until a time to be announced.
7:14:16 P.M. H.R. 1700 Mr. Chabot moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. H.R. 1700 — “To amend the Small Business Act to reauthorize the SCORE program, and for other purposes.”
7:14:23 P.M. H.R. 1700 Considered under suspension of the rules.
7:14:24 P.M. H.R. 1700 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 1700.
7:24:18 P.M. H.R. 1700 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
7:24:19 P.M. H.R. 1700 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
7:25:00 P.M. H.R. 2655 Mr. Chabot moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill. H.R. 2655 — “To amend the Small Business Act to expand intellectual property education and training for small businesses, and for other purposes.”
7:25:06 P.M. H.R. 2655 Considered under suspension of the rules.
7:25:07 P.M. H.R. 2655 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 2655.
7:35:34 P.M. H.R. 2655 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill Agreed to by voice vote.
7:35:36 P.M. H.R. 2655 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
7:35:51 P.M. ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with further one minute speeches.
7:45:05 P.M. SPECIAL ORDER SPEECHES – The House has concluded all anticipated legislative business and has proceeded to Special Order speeches.
8:31:32 P.M. Mr. Zeldin moved that the House do now adjourn.
8:31:49 P.M. On motion to adjourn Agreed to by voice vote.
8:31:50 P.M. The House adjourned. The next meeting is scheduled for 10:00 a.m. on July 11, 2018.
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History … July 2018


The History Place - This Month in History

July 1st

1945 – New York established the New York State Commission Against Discrimination to prevent discrimination in employment because of race, creed or natural origin. It was the first such agency in the U.S. 

1940 – In Washington, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge was opened to traffic. The bridge collapsed during a wind storm on November 7, 1940.

1905 – The USDA Forest Service was created within the Department of Agriculture. The agency was given the mission to sustain healthy, diverse, and productive forests and grasslands for present and future generations

1943 – The U.S. Government began automatically withholding federal income tax from paychecks.

1981 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that candidates for federal office had an “affirmative right” to go on national television.

1946 – U.S. President Harry Truman signed Public Law 476 that incorporated the Civil Air Patrol as a benevolent, nonprofit organization. The Civil Air Patrol was created on December 1, 1941. 

1934 – The Federal Communications Commission replaced the Federal Radio Commission as the regulator of broadcasting in the United States.

1999 – The U.S. Justice Department released new regulations that granted the attorney general sole power to appoint and oversee special counsels. The 1978 independent-counsel statute expired on June 30. 

1863 – During the U.S. Civil War, the first day’s fighting at Gettysburg began.

July 1, 1862 – President Abraham Lincoln signed the first income tax bill, levying a 3% income tax on annual incomes of $600-$10,000 and a 5% tax on incomes over $10,000. Also on this day, the Bureau of Internal Revenue was established by an Act of Congress.

July 1, 1863 – Beginning of the Battle of Gettysburg during the American Civil War.

July 1, 1893 – President Grover Cleveland underwent secret cancer surgery aboard a yacht owned by his friend, Commodore E.C. Benedict. The surgery was performed on a cancerous growth in his mouth. The entire left side of his jaw was removed along with a small portion of his soft palate. A second, smaller operation was performed on July 17th. Cleveland was then fitted with a rubber prosthesis which he wore until his death in 1908. The secrecy was intended to prevent panic among the public during the economic depression of 1893.

July 2nd 

1890 – The U.S. Congress passed the Sherman Antitrust Act.

July 2, 1964 – President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race in public accommodations, publicly owned or operated facilities, employment and union membership and in voter registration. The Act allowed for cutoff of Federal funds in places where discrimination remained.

July 2, 1776 – The Continental Congress in Philadelphia adopted the following resolution, originally introduced on June 7, by Richard Henry Lee of Virginia: “Resolved, That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States, that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved. That it is expedient forthwith to take the most effectual measures for forming foreign Alliances. That a plan of confederation be prepared and transmitted to the respective Colonies for their consideration and approbation.”

 

July 2, 1788 – Congress announced the United States Constitution had been ratified by the required nine states and that a committee had been appointed to make preparations for the new American government.

July 2, 1881 – President James A. Garfield was shot and mortally wounded as he entered a railway station in Washington, D.C. He died on September 19th.

1890 – The U.S. Congress passed the Sherman Antitrust Act.

1926 – The U.S. Congress established the Army Air Corps.

1937 – American aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart disappeared in the Central Pacific during an attempt to fly around the world at the equator.

1976 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled the death penalty was not inherently cruel or unusual.

July 2, 1917 – A race riot occurred in St. Louis, Missouri, resulting in an estimated 75 African Americans killed and hundreds injured. To protest the violence against blacks, W.E.B. DuBois and James Weldon Johnson later led a silent march down Fifth Avenue in New York.

Birthday – The first African American on the U.S. Supreme Court, Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993) was born in Baltimore, Maryland. Nominated by President Johnson, he began his 24-year career on the High Court in 1967.

July 3

July 3, 1775 – During the American RevolutionGeorge Washington took command of the Continental Army at Cambridge, Massachusetts.

July 3, 1976 – The raid on Entebbe airport in Uganda occurred as an Israeli commando unit rescued 103 hostages on a hijacked Air France airliner. The jet had been en route from Tel Aviv to Paris when it was hijacked by pro-Palestinian guerrillas. Three hostages, seven hijackers and twenty Ugandan soldiers were killed during the rescue.

July 3, 1988 – Iran Air Flight 655 was destroyed while flying over the Persian Gulf after the U.S. Navy Warship Vincennes fired two surface-to-air missiles, killing all 290 passengers aboard. A subsequent U.S. military inquiry cited stress related human failure for the mistaken identification of the civilian airbus as an enemy F-14 fighter jet.

July 4

July 4, 1776 – The Declaration of Independence was approved by the Continental Congress.

July 4, 1863– Vicksburg, the last Confederate stronghold on the Mississippi River, surrendered to General Grant and the Army of the West after a six week siege. With the Union in control of the Mississippi, the Confederacy was effectively split in two, cut off from its western allies.

July 4, 1882 – The “Last Great Buffalo Hunt” began on Indian reservation lands near Hettinger, North Dakota as 2,000 Teton Sioux Indians in full hunting regalia killed about 5,000 buffalo. By this time, most of the estimated 60-75 million buffalo in America had been killed by white hunters who usually took the hides and left the meat to rot. By 1883, the last of the free-ranging buffalo were gone.

Birthday – Novelist and short-story writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) was born in Salem, Massachusetts. His works included; The Scarlet Letter, The House of the Seven Gables and The Blithedale Romance.

Birthday – Song writer Stephen Foster (1826-1864) was born in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania. Among his nearly 200 songs were; Oh! Susanna, Camptown Races, Swanee River, Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair, and Beautiful Dreamer. He died in poverty at Bellevue Hospital in New York.

Birthday – Calvin Coolidge (1872-1933) the 30th U.S. President was born in Plymouth, Vermont. He became President on August 3, 1923, after the death of Warren G. Harding. In 1924, Coolidge was elected President but did not run for re-election in 1928.

July 5 

1865 – The U.S. Secret Service Division was created to combat currency counterfeiting, forging and the altering of currency and securities.

July 5, 1775– The Continental Congress adopted the Olive Branch Petition expressing hope for a reconciliation with Britain. However, King George III refused even to look at the petition and instead issued a proclamation declaring the colonists to be in a state of open rebellion.

1935 – U.S. President Roosevelt signed the National Labor Relations Act into law. The act authorized labor to organize for the purpose of collective bargaining.

Birthday – Civil War Admiral David Farragut (1801-1870) was born near Knoxville, Tennessee. He is best remembered for his yelling “Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!” during an attack on his fleet by the Confederates.

Birthday – Promoter and showman P.T. Barnum (1810-1891) was born in Bethel, Connecticut. His American Museum opened in 1842, exhibiting unusual acts such as the Feejee Mermaid, Siamese Twins Chang and Eng, and General Tom Thumb. In 1871, Barnum opened “The Greatest Show on Earth” in Brooklyn, New York. He later merged with rival J.A. Bailey to form the Barnum and Bailey Circus.

Birthday – Cecil J. Rhodes (1853-1902) was born at Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire, England. As a South African millionaire and politician, he was said to have once controlled 90 percent of the world’s diamond production. His will established the Rhodes Scholarships at Oxford University for young scholars aged 18-25. Rhodesia was also named for him.

July 6

July 6, 1885 – Louis Pasteur gave the first successful anti-rabies inoculation to a boy who had been bitten by an infected dog.

Birthday – Revolutionary War Naval Officer John Paul Jones (1747-1792) was born in Kirkbean, Scotland. He is best remembered for responding “I have not yet begun to fight!” to British opponents seeking his surrender during a naval battle.

July 7

1981 – U.S. President Reagan announced he was nominating Arizona Judge Sandra Day O’Connor to become the first female justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

1994 – Amazon.com, Inc. was founded in Seattle, Washington under the name “Cadabra.”

July 7, 1898 – President William McKinley signed a resolution annexing Hawaii. In 1900, Congress made Hawaii an incorporated territory of the U.S., which it remained until becoming a state in 1959.

1947 Alleged and disputed Roswell UFO incident occured

Birthday – Baseball pitcher Leroy R. (Satchel) Paige (1906-1982) was born in Mobile, Alabama. Following a career in the Negro Leagues, he became, at age 42, the first African American pitcher in the American League. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971.

July 8

July 8, 1776 – The first public reading of the Declaration of Independence occurred as Colonel John Nixon read it to an assembled crowd in Philadelphia.

July 8, 1943 – During the Nazi occupation of France, Resistance leader Jean Moulin died following his arrest and subsequent torture by the Gestapo. He had been sent by the Allies into France in 1942 to unite the fledgling Underground movement. In June of 1943, he was arrested in Lyon, tortured for eleven days but betrayed no one. He died aboard a train while being transferred to a concentration camp.

Birthday – Nelson Rockefeller (1908-1979) was born in Bar Harbor, Maine. He served as Governor of New York from 1958 to 1973. He became vice-president under Gerald Ford in 1974, serving until January 20, 1977.

July 9

1847 – A 10-hour work day was established for workers in the state of New Hampshire.

July 9, 1868 – The 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified. The Amendment defined U.S. citizenship and prohibited individual States from abridging the rights of any American citizen without due process and equal protection under the law. The Amendment also barred individuals involved in rebellion against the U.S. from holding public office.

2015 – The South Carolina House of Representatives approved taking down the Confederate flag from the Capitol grounds. The flag was removed the next day and taken to a state military museum.

1776 – The American Declaration of Independence was read aloud to Gen. George Washington’s troops in New York.

July 10 

July 10, 1943 – The Allied invasion of Italy began with an attack on the island of Sicily. The British entry into Syracuse was the first Allied success in Europe. General Dwight D. Eisenhowerlabeled the invasion “the first page in the liberation of the European Continent.”

July 10, 1973 – The Bahamas gained their independence after 250 years as a British Crown Colony.

July 10, 1991 – Boris Yeltsin took the oath of office, becoming the first popularly elected president in Russia’s thousand-year history.

Birthday – Theologian and founder of Presbyterianism, John Calvin (1509-1564) was born in Noyon, France.

Birthday – American artist James Whistler (1834-1903) was born in Lowell, Mass. He is best remembered for his portrait Whistler’s Mother.

Birthday – French author Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was born near Paris. “Happiness,” he wrote in The Past Recaptured, “is beneficial for the body but it is grief that develops the powers of the mind.”

Birthday – Tennis player Arthur Ashe (1943-1993) was born in Richmond, Virginia. He won a total of 33 titles including the U.S. men’s singles championship and U.S. Open in 1968 and the men’s singles at Wimbledon in 1975. As a pioneering African American athlete, he fought against racism and stereotyping and was arrested numerous times while protesting. In 1992, he announced he had likely contracted HIV through a transfusion during heart surgery. He then began a $5 million fundraising effort on behalf of the Arthur Ashe Foundation for the Defeat of AIDS and campaigned for public awareness regarding the dreaded disease. He died from pneumonia in New York, February 6, 1993.

July 11

Birthday – John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) the 6th U.S. President, and son of the 2nd President, John Adams, was born in Braintree, Massachusetts. After serving just one term as President, he served 17 years as a member of Congress. He died in 1848 while in the House of Representatives in the same room in which he had taken the presidential Oath of Office. He was the the first president whose father had also been president.

July 12

July 12, 1943 – During World War II, in the Battle of Kursk, the largest tank battle in history took place outside the small village of Prohorovka, Russia. About nine hundred Russian tanks attacked an equal number of German tanks fighting at close range. When Hitler ordered a cease-fire, 300 German tanks remained strewn over the battlefield.

July 12, 1994 – Germany’s Constitutional Court ended the ban on sending German troops to fight outside the country. The ban had been in effect since the end of World War II. The ruling allowed German troops to join in United Nations and NATO peace-keeping missions. On July 14, German military units marched in Bastille Day celebrations in Paris, the first appearance of German troops there since World War II.

Birthday – British pottery designer Josiah Wedgwood (1730-1795) was born in Burslem, Staffordshire, England.

Birthday – American philosopher Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was born in Concord, Massachusetts. At Walden Pond he wrote, “I frequently tramped eight or ten miles through the deepest snow to keep an appointment with a beech tree, or a yellow birch, or an old acquaintance among the pines.”

July 13

July 13, 1787 – Congress enacted the Northwest Ordinance establishing formal procedures for transforming territories into states. It provided for the eventual establishment of three to five states in the area north of the Ohio River, to be considered equal with the original 13. The Ordinance included a Bill of Rights that guaranteed freedom of religion, the right to trial by jury, public education and a ban on slavery in the Northwest.

July 14

July 14, 1789 – The fall of the Bastille occurred at the beginning of the French Revolution.

July 14, 1791 – In England, the Birmingham riot occurred on the second anniversary of the fall of the Bastille. Mob rule lasted for three days, targeting controversial scientist and theologian Joseph Priestly’s home and laboratory as well as the homes of his friends. Priestly, who had expressed support for the American and French revolutions, fled to London with his family and later moved to America.

Birthday – American folk singer and social activist Woody Guthrie (1912-1967) was born in Okemah, Oklahoma. Best known for This Land Is Your Land, Union Maid, and Hard Traveling.

Birthday – Gerald R. Ford, the 38th U.S. President was born in Omaha, Nebraska, July 14, 1913 (as Leslie King). In 1973, he was appointed vice president following the resignation of Spiro T. Agnew. He became president on August 9, 1974, following the resignation of Richard M. Nixon. He was the first non-elected vice president and non-elected president of the U.S.

July 15 

July 15, 1918 – During the Battle of the Marne in World War I, German General Erich Ludendorff launched Germany’s fifth, and last, offensive to break through the Chateau-Thierry salient. However, the Germans were stopped by American, British and Italian divisions. On July 18, General Foch, Commander-in-Chief of the Allied troops, launched a massive counter-offensive. The Germans began a retreat lasting four months until they requested an armistice in November.

Birthday – Dutch painter Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) was born in Leiden, Holland. Best known for The Night Watch and many portraits and self portraits.

Birthday – The first American saint, Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917) was born in Lombardy, Italy. She was the founder of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and established Catholic schools, orphanages, convents and hospitals. She was canonized, July 7, 1946, by Pope Pius XII.

July 16

July 16, 1769 – San Diego was founded as the mission San Diego de Alcala by Father Junipero Serra.

July 16, 1945 – The experimental Atomic bomb “Fat Boy” was set off at 5:30 a.m. in the desert of New Mexico desert, creating a mushroom cloud rising 41,000 ft. The bomb emitted heat three times the temperature of the interior of the sun and wiped out all plant and animal life within a mile.

July 16, 1969 – The Apollo 11 Lunar landing mission began with a liftoff from Kennedy Space Center at 9:37 a.m.

July 16, 1999 – A small plane piloted by John F. Kennedy Jr. took off at 8:38 p.m. from Fairfield, New Jersey, heading toward Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. His wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy, and her sister Lauren were passengers on the 200 mile trip. The plane was expected to arrive about 10 p.m. but disappeared off radar at 9:40 p.m. Five days later, July 21, following an extensive search, the bodies were recovered from the plane wreckage in 116 feet of water roughly 7 miles off Martha’s Vineyard. The next day, following an autopsy, the cremated remains of John F. Kennedy, 38, his wife Carolyn, 33, and her sister Lauren, 34, were scattered at sea from a U.S. Navy ship, with family members present, not far from where the plane had crashed.

Birthday – British portrait painter Joshua Reynolds (1723-1792) was born in Plympton, Devon, England.

Birthday – Christian Science founder Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910) was born near Concord, New Hampshire.

Birthday – African American journalist and anti-lynching crusader Ida B. Wells (1862-1931) was born to slaves at Holly Springs, Missouri. Following the Civil War, as lynchings became prevalent, Wells traveled extensively, founding anti-lynching societies and black women’s clubs.

Birthday – Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen (1872-1928) was born near Oslo. He was the first to sail from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean via the Northwest Passage. He discovered the South Pole in 1911 and flew over the North Pole in a dirigible in 1926. In June 1928, he flew from Norway to rescue survivors of an Italian Arctic expedition, but his plane vanished.

July 17

1862 – National cemeteries were authorized by the U.S. government

1997 – After 117 years, the Woolworth Corp. closed its last 400 stores.

1998 – Biologists reported that they had deciphered the genome (genetic map) of the syphilis bacterium.

July 17, 1996 – TWA Flight 800 departed Kennedy International Airport in New York bound for Paris but exploded in mid-air 12 minutes after takeoff, apparently the result of a mechanical failure. The Boeing 747 jet crashed into the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Long Island about 8:45 p.m. All 212 passengers and 17 crew members on board were killed.

Birthday – Puerto Rican patriot Luis Munoz-Rivera (1859-1916) was born in Barranquitas, Puerto Rico. He worked tirelessly to attain self-government for his homeland.

July 18

July 18, 1947 – President Harry Truman signed an Executive Order determining the line of succession if the president becomes incapacitated or dies in office. Following the vice president, the speaker of the house and president of the Senate are next in succession. This became the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified on February 10, 1967.

Birthday – American politician Samuel Hayakawa (1906-1992) was born in Vancouver, British Columbia. He is remembered as the college president who climbed atop a sound truck at San Francisco State College in 1968 during student protests, then disconnected the wires thus silencing the demonstrators. This made him popular among conservatives including California Gov. Ronald Reagan. Hayakawa became a Republican and was elected in 1976 to the U.S. Senate, serving just one term. In 1986, he led the successful California initiative to declare English the state’s official language.

Birthday – Nelson Mandela was born the son of a Tembu tribal chieftain on July 18, 1918, at Qunu, near Umtata, in South Africa. He became a lawyer, joined the African National Congress (ANC) in 1944, eventually becoming deputy national president in 1952. In 1964, he was convicted for sabotage as a result of his participation in the struggle against apartheid. He spent the next 28 years in jail, but remained a symbol of hope to South Africa’s non-white majority. Released in 1990, he was elected was elected President of South Africa in 1994 in the first election in which all races participated.

July 19

1974 – The House Judiciary Committee recommended that U.S. President Richard Nixon should stand trial in the Senate for any of the five impeachment charges against him.

1799 – The Rosetta Stone, a tablet with hieroglyphic translations into Greek, was found in Egypt.

July 19-20, 1848 – A women’s rights convention was held at Seneca Falls, New York. Topics discussed included voting rights, property rights and divorce. The convention marked the beginning of an organized women’s rights movement in the U.S.

1964 – In Illinois, Cahokia Mounds was designated as a U.S. National Landmark.

July 19, 1863 – During the American Civil War, Union troops made a second attempt to capture Fort Wagner near Charleston, South Carolina. The attack was led by the 54th Massachusetts Colored Infantry, commanded by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw, who was killed along with half of the 600 men in the regiment. This battle marked the first use of black Union troops in the war.

Birthday – French impressionist painter Edgar Degas (1834-1917) was born in Paris. Best known for his paintings of dancers in motion.

July 20 

1942 – The first detachment of the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps, (WACS) began basic training at Fort Des Moines, Iowa.

July 20, 1715 – The Riot Act took effect in Britain. If a dozen or more persons were disturbing the peace, an authority was required to command silence and read the following, “Our sovereign Lord the King chargeth and commandeth all persons, being assembled, immediately to disperse themselves, and peaceably to depart to their habitations, or to their lawful business, upon the pains contained in the act made in the first year of King George, for preventing tumults and riotous assemblies. God save the king.” Any persons who failed to obey within one hour were to be arrested.

1998 – Russia won a $11.2 billion loan from the International Monetary Fund to help avert the devaluation of its currency.

July 20, 1954 – An agreement was signed in Geneva, Switzerland, ending hostilities between French forces in Vietnam and the People’s Army of Vietnam.

1969 – Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. became the first men to walk on the moon.

July 20, 1969 – A global audience watched on television as Apollo 11 Astronaut Neil Armstrong took his first step onto the moon. As he stepped onto the moon’s surface he proclaimed, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind” – inadvertently omitting an “a” before “man” and slightly changing the meaning.

Birthday – Explorer Edmund Hillary was born in Auckland, New Zealand, July 20, 1919. In 1953, he became first to ascend Mount Everest, the highest mountain in the world at 29,023 ft.

July 21

July 21, 1898 – Guam was ceded to the United States by Spain.

Birthday – Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) was born in Oak Park, Illinois. His works included; The Sun Also Rises (1926), A Farewell to Arms (1929), For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940) and The Old Man and the Sea (1952). Awarded the Nobel Prize in 1954, he wrote little afterward, became ill and shot himself to death on July 2, 1961.

Birthday – University professor and author Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980) was born in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Best known for stating, “The medium is the message,” regarding modern mass communication.

July 22

July 22, 1934 – Bank robber John Dillinger (1902-1934) was shot and killed by FBI agents as he left Chicago’s Biograph Movie Theater after watching the film Manhattan Melodrama starring Clark Gable and Myrna Loy. Dillinger was the first criminal labeled by the FBI as “Public Enemy No. 1.” After spending nine years (1924-1933) in prison, Dillinger went on a deadly crime spree, traveling through the states of Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Iowa. He was reportedly betrayed by the “Lady in Red.”

July 23

1998 – U.S. scientists at the University of Hawaii turned out more than 50 “carbon-copy” mice, with a cloning technique.

July 23, 1952 – Egyptian army officers launched a revolution changing Egypt from a monarchy to a republic.

July 24

July 24, 1943 – During World War II in Europe, the Royal Air Force conducted Operation Gomorrah, raiding Hamburg, while tossing bales of aluminum foil strips overboard to cause German radar screens to see a blizzard of false echoes. As a result, only twelve of 791 Allied bombers involved were shot down.

July 24, 1945 – At the conclusion of the Potsdam Conference in Germany, Winston Churchill, Harry Truman and China’s representatives issued a demand for unconditional Japanese surrender. The Japanese, unaware the demand was backed up by an Atomic bomb, rejected the Potsdam Declaration on July 26.

Birthday – “The Liberator” Simon Bolivar (1783-1830) was born in Caracas, Venezuela. He is known as the George Washington of South America for his efforts to liberate six nations: Venezuela, Colombia, Panama, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia from the rule of Spain.

Birthday – French playwright and novelist Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870) was born in Villers-Cotterets, France. His works included The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers.

Birthday – American pilot Amelia Earhart (1898-1937) was born in Atchison, Kansas. She became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic and to fly solo from Hawaii to California. She perished during a flight from New Guinea to Howland Island over the Pacific Ocean on July 3, 1937.

July 25 

July 25, 1898 – During the Spanish-American War, the U.S. invaded Puerto Rico, which was then a Spanish colony. In 1917, Puerto Ricans became American citizens and Puerto Rico became an unincorporated territory of the U.S. Partial self-government was granted in 1947 allowing citizens to elect their own governor. In 1951, Puerto Ricans wrote their own constitution and elected a non-voting commissioner to represent them in Washington.

July 25, 1909 – The world’s first international overseas airplane flight was achieved by Louis Bleriot in a small monoplane. After asking, “Where is England?” he took off from France and landed in England near Dover, where he was greeted by British police.

July 25, 1943 – Mussolini was deposed just two weeks after the Allied attack on Sicily. The Fascist Grand Council met for the first time since December of 1939 then took a confidence vote resulting in Mussolini being ousted from office and placed under arrest. King Victor Emmanuel of Italy then ordered Marshal Pietro Badoglio to form a new government.

July 25, 1956 – The Italian luxury liner Andrea Doria sank after colliding with the Swedish liner Stockholm on its way to New York. Nearby ships came to the rescue, saving 1,634 people, including the captain and the crew, before the ship went down.

July 26

July 26, 1944 – The U.S. Army began desegregating its training camp facilities. Black platoons were then assigned to white companies in a first step toward battlefield integration. However, the official order integrating the armed forces didn’t come until July 26, 1948, signed by President Harry Truman.

July 26, 1945 – The U.S. Cruiser Indianapolis arrived at Tinian Island in the Marianas with an unassembled Atomic bomb, met by scientists ready to complete the assembly.

July 26, 1953 – The beginning of Fidel Castro’s revolutionary “26th of July Movement.” In 1959, Castro led the rebellion that drove out dictator Fulgencio Batista. Although he once declared that Cuba would never again be ruled by a dictator, Castro’s government became a Communist dictatorship.

Birthday – Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) was born in Dublin, Ireland.

July 27

July 27, 1953 – The Korean War ended with the signing of an armistice by U.S. and North Korean delegates at Panmunjom, Korea. The war had lasted just over three years.

July 28

July 28, 1932 – The Bonus March eviction in Washington, D.C., occurred as U.S. Army troops under the command of General Douglas MacArthur, Major Dwight D. Eisenhower and Major George S. Patton, attacked and burned the encampments of unemployed World War I veterans. About 15,000 veterans had marched on Washington, demanding payment of a war bonus they had been promised. After two months’ encampment in Washington’s Anacostia Flats, forced eviction of the bonus marchers by the U.S. Army was ordered by President Herbert Hoover.

July 28, 1943 – During World War II, a firestorm killed 42,000 civilians in Hamburg, Germany. The firestorm occurred after 2,326 tons of bombs and incendiaries were dropped by the Allies.

Birthday – Jackie Kennedy (1929-1994) was born in Southampton, New York (as Jacqueline Lee Bouvier). She was married to John Fitzgerald Kennedy and after his death later married Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis.

July 29

Birthday – Benito Mussolini (1883-1945) was born in Dovia, Italy. He ruled Italy from 1922-1943, first as prime minister and then as “Il Duce,” the absolute dictator.

July 30

July 30, 1975 – Former Teamsters Union leader James Hoffa was last seen outside a restaurant near Detroit, Michigan. His 13-year federal prison sentence had been commuted by President Richard M. Nixon in 1971. On December 8, 1982, seven years after his disappearance, an Oakland County judge declared Hoffa officially dead.

Birthday – Automotive pioneer Henry Ford (1863-1947) was born in Dearborn Township, Michigan. He developed an assembly-line production system and introduced a $5-a-day wage for automotive workers. “History is bunk,” he once said.

July 31

July 31, 1776 – During the American Revolution, Francis Salvador became the first Jew to die in the conflict. He had also been the first Jew elected to office in Colonial America, voted a member of the South Carolina Provincial Congress in January 1775.

July 31, 1790 – The U.S. Patent Office first opened its doors. The first U.S. patent was issued to Samuel Hopkins of Vermont for a new method of making pearlash and potash. The patent was signed by George Washington and Thomas Jefferson.

(Photo and picture credits: Library of Congress and U.S. National Archives)

Resources: …combined

onthisday.com

historyplace.com

i thank them  for being here!!! let me know of all errors if any and i will correct the info as the two companies differ on history information …

History~ “Domestic” workers have been excluded from basic workers’ rights laws for decades.


FDA/USDA ~ July 2018 Alerts & Safety


  •  Updated information is now available. The lists of retail consignees have been posted for recalls:
  • Smithfield Packaged Meats Corp. Recalls Pepperoni Five Cheese Calzone Products Due to Possible Extraneous Material ContaminationSmithfield Packaged Meats Corp., doing business as Stefano Foods., a Charlotte, N.C. establishment, is recalling approximately 24,048 pounds of pepperoni five cheese calzones that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically pieces of hard, sharp, clear plastic.
  • ALDI has voluntarily recalled AnnaSea Wasabi Ahi Poke Hawaiian Poke Kits and Limu Ahi Poke Hawaiian Poke Kits sold at one retail store location in North Carolina. While the products are required to remain at frozen temperatures to ensure safety, this store location displayed and sold the products from the cooler section. Because storing the products at temperatures above freezing prior to consumption can render the products unsafe for consumption, ALDI is recalling these items.Customers should discard any affected item or return it to their nearest ALDI for a full refund.ALDI has removed all affected products from store shelves, and is not currently selling these items.

    Product Information: Wasabi Ahi Hawaiian Poke Kit, Limu Ahi Poke Kit UPC code 99221 00110 and Limu Ahi Hawaiian Poke Kit UPC Code 99221 00109. Products have best by dates of 5/23/2020. 6/11/2020, 6/12/2020, and 6/14/2020.

    The retail location in North Carolina where the products were displayed and sold at incorrect temperatures is located at 110 Duncan Hill Road, Hendersonville, NC.

    To date, no illnesses related to this product have been reported. No other ALDI or AnnaSea products are affected by this recall.

    Any AnnaSea Poke Kits purchased from the freezer section at any other ALDI location in North Carolina are not part of this recall and are considered safe for consumption.

    ALDI takes the safety and integrity of the products it sells seriously. If customers have product affected by this voluntary recall, or if there is any uncertainty, they should discard it immediately or return it to their local store for a full refund.

    Customers who have questions about this recall may contact ALDI customer service via aldi.us/customer-service or 1-800-325-7894, Monday- Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. CST.

    ALDI sincerely regrets any inconvenience and concern this voluntary recall may cause.

    (Ohio)

    ALDI has voluntarily recalled AnnaSea Wasabi Ahi Poke Hawaiian Poke Kits and Limu Ahi Poke Hawaiian Poke Kits sold at two retail store locations in Ohio. While the products are required to remain at frozen temperatures to ensure safety, these store locations displayed and sold the products from the cooler section. Because storing the products at temperatures above freezing prior to consumption can render the products unsafe for consumption, ALDI is recalling these items.

    Customers should discard any affected item or return it to their nearest ALDI for a full refund.

    ALDI has removed all affected products from store shelves, and is not currently selling these items.

    Product Information: Wasabi Ahi Hawaiian Poke Kit, Limu Ahi Poke Kit UPC code 99221 00110 and Limu Ahi Hawaiian Poke Kit UPC Code 99221 00109. Products have best by dates of: 5/23/2020, 6/11/2020, 6/12/2020, and 6/14/2020.

    The retail locations in Ohio where the products were displayed and sold at incorrect temperatures include:

    • 2725 Maret St. NE, Canton, OH
    • 4664 Sawmill Rd, Columbus, OH

    To date, no illnesses related to this product have been reported. No other ALDI or AnnaSea products are affected by this recall.

    Any AnnaSea Poke Kits purchased from the freezer section at any ALDI locations in Ohio not listed above are not part of this recall and are considered safe for consumption.

    ALDI takes the safety and integrity of the products it sells seriously. If customers have product affected by this voluntary recall, or if there is any uncertainty, they should discard it immediately or return it to their local store for a full refund.

    Customers who have questions about this recall may contact ALDI customer service via aldi.uslcustomerservice or 1-800-325-7894, Monday- Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. CST.

    ALDI sincerely regrets any inconvenience and concern this voluntary recall may cause.

    (Maryland/Virginia)

    ALDI has voluntarily recalled AnnaSea Wasabi Ahi Poke Hawaiian Poke Kits and Limu Ahi Poke Hawaiian Poke Kits sold at six retail store locations in Maryland and Virginia. While the products are required to remain at frozen temperatures to ensure safety, these store locations displayed and sold the products from the cooler section. Because storing the products at temperatures above freezing prior to consumption can render the products unsafe for consumption, ALDI is recalling these items.

    Customers should discard any affected item or return it to their nearest ALDI for a full refund.

    ALDI has removed all affected products from store shelves, and is not currently selling these items.

    Product Information: Wasabi Ahi Hawaiian Poke Kit, Limu Ahi Poke Kit UPC code 99221 0010 and Limu Ahi Hawaiian Poke Kit UPC Code 99221 00109. Products have best by dates of: 5/23/2020, 6/11/2020, 6/12/2020, and 6/14/2020.

    The retail locations in Maryland and Virginia where the products were displayed and sold at incorrect temperatures include:

    • 8256 Richmond Hwy, Alexandria, VA
    • 6301 Marlboro Pike, District Heights, MD
    • 1312 Business Center Way, Edgewood, MD
    • 3250 East Fayette St., Baltimore, MD
    • 7500 Albert Rd., Brandywine, MD
    • 20904 Frederick Road, Germantown, MD

    To date, no illnesses related to this product have been reported. No other ALDI or AnnaSea products are affected by this recall.

    Any AnnaSea Poke Kits purchased from the freezer section at any ALDI locations in Maryland and Virginia, not listed above are not part of this recall and are considered safe for consumption.

    ALDI takes the safety and integrity of the products it sells seriously. If customers have product affected by this voluntary recall, or if there is any uncertainty, they should discard it immediately or return it to their local store for a full refund.

    Customers who have questions about this recall may contact ALDI customer service via aldi.us/customerservice or 1-800-325-7894, Monday – Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. CST.

  • Rad Cat  Listeria monocytogenes or Shiga Toxin producing E. coli O121
  • H-E-B https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm613925.htm Due to broken metal in processing equipment
  • Hy-Vee  May be contaminated with Salmonella
  • Valsartan and Valsartan Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets.You can read the complete recall information at:

Recall posted on July 17, 2018:   

Valsartan and valsartan hydrochlorothiazide) tablets by Teva Pharmaceuticals USA – recall due to impurity detected in the API is N-nitrosodimethylamine

Recall posted on July 13, 2018:

  • Win Opportunity Knocks Recalls Fresh and Frozen, Raw Ground Beef Products Due to Possible E. Coli O45, O103 and O145 Contamination Win Opportunity Knocks, doing business as Ottomanelli Wholesale Meats Inc., a St. Petersburg, Fla. establishment, is recalling approximately 6,020 pounds of fresh and frozen, raw ground beef products that may be contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O45, O103 and O145.
  • Prinston Pharmaceutical Inc. dba Solco Healthcare LLC. is recalling all lots of Valsartan Tablets, 40 mg, 80mg, 160mg,   and 320mg; and Valsartan-Hydrochlorothiazide Tablets, 80mg/12.5mg, 160mg/12.5mg, 160mg/25mg, 320mg/12.5mg, and 320mg/25mg to the retail level. This product recall is due to the detection of a trace amount of an unexpected impurity, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), made by the manufacturer – Zhejiang Huahai Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd. — that is used in the manufacture of the subject product lots. This impurity has been classified as a probable human carcinogen as per International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classification.The products are indicated for the treatment of hypertension.Theexposureto the impurity N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) that was detected in valsartan product line presents an unacceptable carcinogenic risk to the intended patient population. To date, Prinston Pharmaceutical Inc. has not received any reports of adverse events related to this recall.
    Product NDC Code Lot Number Expiry Dates Distribution Date
    VALSARTAN TABLETS 40MG 30CT 43547-367-03 All lots From Jul 18 to Jan 20 Oct 2015 – Jun 2018
    VALSARTAN TABLETS 80MG 90CT 43547-368-09 All lots From Jul 18 to Jan 20 Oct 2015 – Jun 2018
    VALSARTAN TABLETS 160MG 90CT 43547-369-09 All lots From Jul 18 to Jan 20 Oct 2015 – Jun 2018
    VALSARTAN TABLETS 320MG 90CT 43547-370-09 All lots From Jul 18 to Jan 20 Oct 2015 – Jun 2018
    VALSARTAN/HCTZ 80MG/12.5MG 90CT TABLETS 43547-311-09 All lots From Jul 18 to Jan 20 Jun 2016 – Jun 2018
    VALSARTAN/HCTZ 160MG/12.5MG 90CT TABLETS 43547-312-09 All lots From Jul 18 to Jan 20 Jun 2016 – Jun 2018
    VALSARTAN/HCTZ 160MG/25MG 90CT TABLETS 43547-313-09 All lots From Jul 18 to Jan 20 Jun 2016 – Jun 2018
    VALSARTAN/HCTZ 320MG/12.5MG 90CT TABLETS 43547-314-09 All lots From Jul 18 to Jan 20 Jun 2016 – Jun 2018
    VALSARTAN/HCTZ 320MG/25MG 90CT TABLETS 43547-315-09 All lots From Jul 18 to Jan 20 Jun 2016 – Jun 2018

    The lot number and expiry date information can be found on the manufacturer’s unit (see photographs below of packaged product bottle labels).

    Retail pharmacies in possession of any unused products: Valsartan Tablets, 40 mg, 80mg, 160mg, and 320mg; and Valsartan-HCTZ Tablets, 80mg/12.5mg, 160mg/12.5mg, 160mg/25mg, 320mg/12.5mg, and 320mg/25mg, within expiry dates from Jul 2018 to Jan 2020 should immediately return the product by following the instructions below:

    • Please contact Solco Customer Service at 1-866-931-9829, Option 5, Monday through Friday (9am to 5pm EST) or email or fax to: customerservice@solcohealthcare.com; 1- 866-931-0709, for the Product Return.
    • A call tag, a pre-printed, pre-paid return label will be provided to you for product return; return is free of charge.
    • Return products to:
      DLSS (Dohmen Life Science Services) Attn: Returns Department
      4580 S. Mendenhall, Memphis, TN 38141

    Solco is notifying its distributors and customers by letter and email and is arranging for return of all recalled products. Pharmacies and wholesalers that received the impacted products will receive a letter as well as a copy of this press release with their recall notification information.

    If you have any questions regarding this recall, please call 1-866-931-9829, Option 5, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST Monday through Friday. Consumers should contact  their physician or healthcare provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to using this product. Additional information regarding this recall affected products’ lots and expiry dates can be found at http://www.solcohealthcare.com/uploads/news/ValsartanHCTZRecallAffactedLots.pdfor to download at http://www.solcohealthcare.com/uploads/news/ValsartanHCTZRecallAffactedLots.xlsx

    Adverse reactions or quality problems associated with the use of this product may be reported to FDA’s MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program either by phone, on line, by regular mail or by fax.

  • Aunt Kitty’s Foods, Inc., a Vineland, N.J. establishment, is recalling approximately 10,805 pounds of canned chicken gravy products due to a possible processing deviation that may have led to underprocessing of products, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

    The canned chicken gravy was produced on April 4, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF only)]

    • 10.5-oz. canned “Western Beef Chicken GRAVY” with lot codes 1809515, 1809525, 1809535, and 1809545 and a best by date of June 2021.
    • 10.5-oz. canned “ShopRite Chicken GRAVY” with lot code 1809515, 1809525, 1809535, and 1809545 and a best by date of June 2021.
    • 10.5-oz. canned “Price Rite Chicken GRAVY” with lot code 1809515, 1809525, 1809535, and 1809545 and a best by date of June 2021.

    The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-864” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in New Jersey and New York.

    The problem was discovered on June 19, 2018 during the establishment’s labeling process, which detected multiple bulging cans of chicken gravy.  FSIS was notified on June 21, 2018.

    There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

    Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

    FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution lists will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

    Consumers and members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Craig Adams, Vice President of Quality Assurance, Aunt Kitty’s Foods, Inc. (717) 634-3198.

  • New Seasons Market Recalls Ready-To-Eat Sesame Noodle Chicken Salad Products Due to Misbranding and Undeclared AllergensNew Seasons Market, a Portland, Ore. establishment, is recalling an undetermined amount of ready-to-eat sesame noodle chicken salad products due to misbranding and undeclared allergens.
  • FDA announces voluntary recall of several medicines containing valsartan following detection of an impurity was just added to the FDA Recalls webpage.
  • The Beautiful Pig, Inc. Recalls Ready-To-Eat And Raw Pork And Beef Products Produced Without The Benefit Of Inspection And Shipped Under U.S. Retention The Beautiful Pig, Inc., a Longview, Wash. establishment, is recalling an undetermined amount of ready-to-eat and raw pork and beef products because the products were produced, packed and distributed without the benefit of inspection and were also under U.S. retention when shipped without approval
  • Recall Notification Report 059-2018 (Beef Jerky Products)Tillamook Country Smoker, LLC, a Bay City, Ore. establishment, is recalling approximately 102 pounds of ready-to-eat beef jerky products due to misbranding.
  • Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Bacteria Found In Saje Splish Splash Gentle Baby Wash was recently added to the FDA Recalls webpage.
    You can read the complete recall alert at: https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm612744.htm
  • Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics: FDA Requires Labeling Changes Due to Low Blood Sugar Levels and Mental Health Side Effects intended for: Patient, Health Professional, Pharmacy was just added to the FDA MedWatch Webpage.
    You can read the complete MedWatch Safety Alert that includes recommendations at: https://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm612979.htm 
  • Radagast Pet Food, Inc. of Portland, OR is recalling three lots of Rad Cat Raw Diet Free-Range Chicken Recipe because testing results indicate they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. The Company is also recalling one lot of Rad Cat Raw Diet Pasture-Raised Venison Recipe because testing results indicate it has the potential to be contaminated with Shiga Toxin producing E. coli O121.  This recall is being conducted out of an abundance of caution.  Due to Radagast Pet Food’s commitment to food safety and quality, The Company is conducting this voluntary recall.This recall includes only the lots listed below.Listeria monocytogenes is pathogenic to humans. Healthy people exposed to Listeria monocytogenes should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and fever.  There is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.Listeria monocytogenes can affect animals eating the product. Animals exposed to Listeria monocytogenes can display short-term symptoms such as: vomiting, diarrhea, fever, muscular or respiratory signs and anorexia.  If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.Shiga Toxin releasing E. coli O121 (STEC) is a pathogenic bacterium that can cause illness in humans. People handling or consuming raw pet foods contaminated with this pathogenic bacterium can lead to E. coli infections. E. coli O121 can cause symptoms which include stomach cramps, mild fever and vomiting, and diarrhea, often with bloody stools. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.Although E. coli O121 is not known to cause illness in cats, the FDA has a zero-tolerance rule for pathogens in pet food, as humans that handle the food may become infected. Infected cats can become carriers of E. coli O121 and transfer the E. coli O121 to the home environment.No pet or human illnesses have been reported.The three lots of Rad Cat Raw Diet Free-Range Chicken Recipe were shipped to distributors in the US in May and June 2018:Affected products are determined by Lot Code identification only.Free-Range Chicken Recipe:
    Lot Code 63057, Best By Date: 10/9/2019
    Lot Code 63069, Best By Date: 10/23/2019*
    Lot Code 63076, Best By Date: 10/31/2019*
    (8oz UPC 8 51536 00103 6, 16oz UPC 8 51536 00104 3, 24oz UPC 8 51536 00105 0)*These two lots were shipped to one distributor in Vancouver, BC, Canada in addition to US distributors in May and June, 2018:The single lot of Rad Cat Raw Diet Pasture-Raised Venison Recipe, was shipped to distributors in the US only in May and June:Pasture-Raised Venison Recipe:
    Lot Code 63063, Best By Date: 10/15/2019 
    (8oz UPC 8 51536 00121 0, 16oz UPC 8 51536 00122 7, 24oz UPC 8 51536 00123 4 and 1oz Samples)

    The Company discovered these lots were potentially contaminated during enhanced quality testing it conducted as a follow-up to its March 2018 recall.

    Consumers are encouraged to check the Lot Codes on their Free-Range Chicken Recipe and Pasture-Raised Venison Recipe containers.  The Lot Codes can be found printed on the bottom of the plastic containers.  Any products with these Lot Codes should be returned to the specialty retailer where purchased for a full refund.

    Consumers with questions should contact Radagast Pet Food, Inc. at 503-736-4649 Monday-Friday 9:00am – 5:00pm Pacific Time or contact us through our website at http://www.RadFood.com.

  • Saje Natural Wellness is warning customers not to use Splish Splash Gentle Baby Wash, 8.5 fl. oz. and 1.7 fl. oz. (found in the Wee and Well Gentle Baby Care Kit) as it may contain the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosaPseudomonas aeruginosais an opportunistic pathogen that causes infection and results in bacteria in the blood, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems.The product being recalled is:
    Brand Name & Product Name Product SKU Package Size Lot Number Expiry Date
    Saje Natural Wellness Splish Splash Gentle Baby Wash 700552
    (USA/Int’l)
    8.5 fl. oz. 814020 All expiry dates
    Saje Natural Wellness Splish Splash Gentle Baby Wash (found in Wee and Well Gentle Baby Care Kit) 700561
    (USA/Int’l)
    1.7 fl. oz. 814020 All expiry dates

    The product is distributed in the United States through Saje retail locations in California, New Jersey, and New York. The product is also distributed through online sales across the United States and internationally.

    Based on routine sample testing, one lot (814020) of Splish Splash Gentle Baby Wash 8.5 fl. oz. was found to contain the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    There have not been any reported adverse reactions for this product in the United States to date.

    As a precautionary measure, consumers who have received or purchased Splish Splash Gentle Baby Wash (Lot# 814020), in any size or format, should return the product to a Saje retail outlet, for a full refund. The 6 digit lot number is located on the information panel on the back of the product, below the SKU number.  Consumers may also contact the Customer Experience team at Saje Natural Wellness to return the product through  prepaid mail, and to receive a full refund. Phone 1-877-275-7253 or email hello@saje.com. The hours of operation are from 05:00AM to 08:00PM PST, Monday through Friday and 08:00AM to 05:00PM PST Saturday and Sunday.

  • Afandina Halal Recalls Raw Chicken Products Produced Without Benefit of InspectionAfandina Halal, a Long Island City, N.Y. establishment, is recalling an undetermined amount of raw poultry products that were produced, packaged and distributed without the benefit of federal inspection.
  • LL’s Magnetic Clay, Inc. of Austin, Texas is recalling all lots of Prescript-Assist (still within expiration date), a dietary supplement it marketed until late 2017, because of its potential to contain undeclared allergens, including almonds, crustaceans, milk, casein, eggs, and peanuts. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to these specific types of allergens run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.Prescript-Assist dietary supplement was distributed nationwide, including through online sales on the LL’s Magnetic Clay website and brick and mortar retailers. The Prescript-Assist product is available through distributors other than LL’s Magnetic Clay that purchased the product from the same source.All lots sold between 1/29/2015 – 12/31/2017 are potentially impacted. The white bottles contain capsules in quantities of either 60 or 90 capsules per bottle. A representative label is included below.No illnesses regarding these products have been reported to date.The recall was initiated after potential cGMP failures in the supply chain were identified by LL’s Magnetic Clay.Consumers who have purchased Prescript Assist from LL’s Magnetic Clay are urged to discontinue use and return it to LL’s Magnetic Clay for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company M-F, 9am-5pm at 1-800-257-3315.
  • Recall Notification Report 059-2018 (Beef Jerky Products)Tillamook Country Smoker, LLC, a Bay City, Ore. establishment, is recalling approximately 102 pounds of ready-to-eat beef jerky products due to misbranding.
  • Nueske’s Meat Products, Inc., a Wittenberg, Wis. establishment, is recalling approximately 12,946 pounds of pork products due to misbranding, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The products may contain brown rice flour and glycerin, ingredients that are not declared on the product label.

    The fully cooked braised pork items were packaged on various dates between Feb. 24, 2017 and May 23, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: [View Label (PDF only)]

    • 1-lb. 6-oz. (22 oz.) vacuum-sealed packages containing “NUESKE’S BRAISED PORK MEDALLIONS in a mushroom pork demi-glace” with lot codes 700053, 600342, 700055, 700145, 700243, 700250, 700261, 800039, 800066 and 800114.
    • 2.5-lb. (40 oz.) vacuum-sealed packages containing “NUESKE’S BRAISED PORK SHANK In Pork Demi-Glace” with lot codes 700035, 700047, 700098, 700166, 700228, 700238,700242, 700256, 700262, 700144, 800032, 800046, 800087 and 800108.

    The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 20341” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped directly to consumers nationwide via internet and mail order sales.

    The problem was discovered on June 29, 2018 when the firm informed FSIS that the supplier had reformulated the product without notifying the firm.

    There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

    FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

    Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Tammy Beran, Quality Assurance Director, Nueske’s Meat Products, Inc., at (715) 253-4058. Consumers wishing to return the product for a refund or replacement should contact Nueske’s Customer Service Department at (800) 720-1153. Members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Megan Dorsch, Marketing Manager, Nueske’s Meat Products, Inc., at (715) 253-4006.

Updated information is now available. The lists of retail consignees have been posted for recalls:

  • 057-2018L&D Market, Inc. Recalls Chicken Wrap Products Due to Misbranding and Undeclared Allergens  (June 29, 2018)
  • Blissful Remedies., is voluntarily recalling only Lot No.: 112710 with expiration 03/2019 found embedded on the top of package of kratom ( mitragyn a speciosa) powder products, it manufactured, processed, packed, and/or held, between “March 1, 2018” to “April 30, 2018” to the consumer level. The products have been found by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) via sample testing to have salmonella contamination. Blissful Remedies has not received reports of adverse events related to this recall. In lieu of such FDA findings the company has implemented standard operating procedures and sterilization processes in accordance to FDA guidelines.These products have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infect ion with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.The product is used as Nevada and is packaged in white foil pouches with Lot No.: 112710 and expiration 03/2019 . The affected products are as follows:
    Products Label Size Packaging
    Red Maeng Da (100% Mitragyna
    Speciosa)
    50 capsules White Foil Pouches
    Gold Series Ultra Enhanced Indo
    (100% Mitragyna Speciosa)
    50 capsules White Foil Pouches
    Kratom+CBD., CBD infused
    Maeng Da
    50 capsules White Foil Pouches

    These products were distributed to retail stores located in AK, AZ, CA, FL, GA, HI, IL, KS, KY, CT, MA, MI, MN, MO, MS, NE, NJ, NM, NY, OH, OK, PA, PR, SD, TX, VA.

    Blissful Remedies is notifying its retailers by e-mail and/or telephone and customers are urged to return the recalled products to us or immediately discard them for credit.

    Consumers with questions regarding this recall can contact the company at fdarecall@blissfulremedies.com or 1-800-435-8533 , 9 am to 6 pm (Central Time Zone), Monday through Friday. Consumers should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to taking or using this product.

    Adverse reactions or quality problems experienced with the use of this product may be reported to the FDA’s MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program either online, by regular mail or by fax.

    Onlinehttp://www.fda.gov/medwatch/report.htm
    Regular Mail or Fax: Download form http://www.fda.gov/MedWatch/getforms.htm or call 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the pre-addressed form, or submit by fax to 1-800-FDA-0178

10 Amazing Facts About The Apollo 11 Moon Landing


Although the first moon landing was an amazing feat within itself, there is also a fascinating amount of trivia that surrounds the landing.

“That’s one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind.” Those were the famous remarks made by astronaut Neil Armstrong as he made the first human footprints on the Moon. The Apollo 11 was the government mission that aimed to have a manned lunar landing which featured the spacecraft “Eagle” launched from the “Saturn V” rocket. The Moon landing was arguably one of the most critical landmarks of human civilization and its significance still resonates today. While the event remains to be hugely popular both in the scientific world as well as in pop culture, several fun facts about the mission still remain relatively unknown.

10. Armstrong carried with him a piece of wood from an airplane that belonged to the Wright brothers.

The first recorded flight was achieved by the Wright Brothers in 1903, 66 years before the first manned lunar mission. Thus, Neil Armstrong saw it fit to take with him pieces of wood from the pioneering Wright plane as well as a piece of fabric from the plane to symbolize the great progress made in aviation. Armstrong held these in his “personal preference kit” (PPK). The Wright Brothers, like Neil, were from the state of Ohio. The artefacts now sit in the Smithsonian museum in Washington, D.C.

9. If Apollo 11 had failed, President Nixon had a speech ready.

Although the Apollo 11 now has a cemented place in world history, at the time of its launch its success was not so certain. The mission had such a large risk of failing, in fact, that President Richard Nixon had a speech at the ready in case of catastrophe. As nobody had ever once landed on the Moon, it was not known whether or not it was even possible to takeoff from the Moon in order to return back to Earth. Thankfully, there was never occasion for the use of the speech, although copies of the text have since surfaced.

8. Armstrong and Aldrin spent almost a full day on the Moon’s surface.

The period spent outside the probe while on the Moon is known as “extravehicular activity”, or EVA, a term that covers any astronaut activity performed beyond the Earth’s atmosphere. Due to the many experiments the astronauts conducted on the Moon as well as placement of the many instruments involved, the total EVA lasted 21 hours and 36 minutes. However, only a few hours of time was spent on the lunar surface itself, as the astronauts took breaks in the probe as well.

7. After returning to earth, the astronauts had to be placed into quarantine.

After landing on Earth, the three astronauts were promptly taken to a quarantine facility where they remained for 21 days. The reason behind this strange action was to prevent contamination of any micro-organisms carried by the crew from the Moon, as the astronauts were returning from very uncharted territory. Nobody in the space program was sure whether or not the lunar surface was sterile. Of course, later studies confirmed the Moon to be void of any forms of life.

6. The astronauts left pictures of human beings and the recordings of many languages on the Moon’s surface.

The astronauts left several items on the surface of the Moon, including pictures of human beings as well as audio recordings of several different languages to represent the global significance of the mission. Medallions bearing names of the three astronauts who perished in Apollo 1 on the launch pad and the two cosmonauts who perished in a similar accident were all left on the surface of the Moon as well.

5. The astronauts declared “moon rock and moon dust samples” to customs when they returned to Earth.

#5 The astronauts declared "moon rock and moon dust samples" to customs when they returned to Earth.

In 2015, Buzz Aldrin tweeted a “travel voucher” that outlined the nature of expenses incurred from his trip out of the atmosphere, just like somebody would for a trip of a more Earthly nature. In addition, he revealed that the astronauts were required to sign customs forms upon their return to Earth, upon which they declared to be carrying “moon rock and moon dust samples”.

4. The astronauts landed with only 25 seconds of fuel to spare.

In vein with the intricate planning of the Apollo 11 mission, a site on the Moon was picked as the landing site that was thought to be a clear choice. However, while the Apollo probe was descending, the two astronauts realized the site was filled with boulders and knew it would be hazardous to attempt their descent. Therefore, Armstrong began to manually navigate the probe which involved skimming over the risky site, a decision which meant more fuel would be consumed while skimming over the location. The probe had a fuel limit set where upon reaching it, automatic abort of the landing would begin. The probe landed 25 seconds before reaching this point. What this means is that if the probe were 25 seconds late on its landing, automatic abortion of the mission would have occurred, forcing them to travel back to the Columbia that was orbiting the Moon.

3. The exact phrase uttered by Armstrong has been disputed.

“That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind” is a phrase familiar to many, but did you know that its accuracy has been disputed by Armstrong himself? The exact quote, Armstrong claimed, is actually “that’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.” Although many claimed to not hear this subtle variation, linguists have confirmed that Armstong does in fact utter “a”, leading to the quote to most officially be presented with the article in brackets.

2. The landing was watched on television by an estimated 600 million people.

The record-breaking event was seen by millions of viewers around the planet. In the days preceding the mission, media outlets all over spoke extensively of the mission, leading to widespread public anticipation. There was a great amount media coverage of the event in the United States, and it is estimated that over 53 million families watched the mission on television. Global viewership was estimated to be more than 550 million viewers, a world record at the time.

1. Although there were three astronauts sent to the Moon, only two of them actually stepped on it.

Many people who have knowledge of the Apollo mission believe that the probe carried only two astronauts, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, with Armstrong being more famous of the two. While it is true that the module that landed on the Moon carried the two astronauts, they were three in total when they left the Kennedy Space Center, Florida on July 16th, 1969. When the Apollo spacecraft approached the Moon, one module was left orbiting around the Moon and was piloted by the third astronaut named Michael Collins. Although Collins did not experience the glory of stepping on the Moon’s surface firsthand, the mission would not have been possible without him.

This page was last updated on April 25, 2017.
     On WorldAtlas.com

Seneca Falls … july 19 to 20, 1848


Originally known as the Woman’s Rights Convention, the Seneca Falls Convention fought for the social, civil and religious rights of women. The meeting was held from July 19 to 20, 1848 at the Wesleyan Chapel in Seneca Falls, New York.

Despite scarce publicity, 300 people—mostly area residents—showed up. On the first day, only women were allowed to attend (the second day was open to men).

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, one of the meeting’s organizers, began with a speech on the convention’s goals and purpose:

“We are assembled to protest against a form of government, existing without the consent of the governed—to declare our right to be free as man is free, to be represented in the government which we are taxed to support, to have such disgraceful laws as give man the power to chastise and imprison his wife, to take the wages which she earns, the property which she inherits, and, in case of separation, the children of her love.”

The convention proceeded to discuss the 11 resolutions on women’s rights. All passed unanimously except for the ninth resolution, which demanded the right to vote for women. Stanton and African American abolitionist Frederick Douglass gave impassioned speeches in its defense before it eventually (and barely) passed.

The five women who organized the Seneca Falls Convention were also active in the abolitionist movement, which called for the emancipation of slaves and the end of racial discrimination. They included:
 

  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a leading women’s rights advocate who was a driving organizer of the Seneca Falls Convention. Stanton first became invested in women’s rights after talking to her father, a law professor, and his students. She studied at Troy Female Seminary and worked on women’s property rights reform in the early 1840s.
  • Lucretia Mott, a Quaker preacher from Philadelphia, who was known for her anti-slavery, women’s rights and religious reform activism.
  • Mary McClintock, the daughter of Quaker anti-slavery, temperance and women’s rights activists. In 1833, McClintock and Mott organized the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society. At the Seneca Falls Convention, McClintock was appointed secretary.
  • Martha Coffin Wright, Lucretia Mott’s sister. In addition being a lifelong proponent of women’s rights, she was an abolitionist who ran a station on the Underground Railroad from her Auburn, New York, home.
  • Jane Hunt, another Quaker activist, was a member of McClintock’s extended family through marriage.

Stanton and Mott first met in London in 1840, where they were attending the World Anti-Slavery Convention with their husbands. When the convention excluded women delegates solely based on their sex, the pair resolved to hold a women’s rights convention.

Back in the United States, women’s rights reformers had already begun contending for women’s rights to speak out on moral and political issues beginning in the 1830s. Around the same time in New York, where Stanton lived, legal reformers had been discussing equality and challenging state laws prohibiting married women from owning property. By 1848, equal rights for women was a divisive issue.

In July of 1848, Stanton, frustrated with her role staying at home raising kids, convinced Mott, Wright and McClintock to help organize the Seneca Falls Convention and write its main manifesto, the Declaration of Sentiments.

Together, the five women drafted a notice to announce “a Convention to discuss the social, civic and religious condition and rights of Woman” around Hunt’s tea table.

The Declaration of Sentiments was the Seneca Falls Convention’s manifesto that described women’s grievances and demands. Written primarily by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, it called on women to fight for their Constitutionally guaranteed right to equality as U.S. citizens.

“We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men and women are created equal,” the document stated. Inspired by the Declaration of Independence, the Declaration of Sentiments asserted women’s equality in politics, family, education, jobs, religion and morals.

The declaration began with 19 “abuses and usurpations” that were destined to destroy a woman’s “confidence in her own powers, to lessen her self-respect, and to make her willing to lead a dependent and abject life.”

Because women didn’t have the right to vote—a right given to “the most ignorant and degraded men”—they were forced to submit to laws to which they did not consent. Women were denied an education and issued an inferior role in the church.

Moreover, women were required to be obedient to their husbands and prevented from owning property, including the wages they earned (which technically belonged to their husbands). And they received unequal rights upon divorce.

In light of these abuses, the declaration called on women to “throw off such government.”

Next came a list of 11 resolutions, which  demanded women be regarded as men’s equal. The resolutions called on Americans to regard any laws that placed women in an inferior position to men as having “no force or authority.” They resolved for women to have equal rights within the church and equal access to jobs.

The ninth resolution was the most controversial, as it called women “to secure to themselves their sacred right to the elective franchise,” or the right to vote.

Although its passage led many women’s rights proponents to withdraw their support, the ninth resolution went on to become the cornerstone of the women’s suffrage movement.

In New York and across the U.S., newspapers covered the convention, both in support and against its objectives.

Horace Greely, the influential editor of The New York Tribune, echoed the opinion of many people at the time. While skeptical of giving women the right to vote, he argued that if Americans really believed in the Constitution, women must attain equal rights:

“When a sincere republican is asked to say in sober earnest what adequate reason he can give, for refusing the demand of women to an equal participation with men in political rights, he must answer, None at all. However unwise and mistaken the demand, it is but the assertion of a natural right, and such must be conceded.”

Two weeks later, on August 2, 1848, the Seneca Falls Convention reconvened at the First Unitarian Church of Rochester, New York, to reaffirm the movement’s goals with a larger audience.

In the following years, the convention’s leaders continued to campaign for women’s rights at state and nationwide events. Reformers frequently referred to the Declaration of Sentiments as they campaigned for women’s rights.

Between 1848 and 1862, the participants of the Seneca Falls Convention used the Declaration of Sentiments to “employ agents, circulate tracts, petition the State and national Legislatures, and endeavor to enlist the pulpit and the press in our behalf.”

After 72 years of organized struggle, all American women finally achieved the same rights as men at the polling box when, in 1920, women won the right to vote with the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions. Rutgers University.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton. National Park Service.
Jane Hunt. National Park Service.
Lucretia Mott. National Park Service.
Mary McClintock. National Park Service.
Martha C. Wright. National Park Service.
Report of the Women’s Rights Convention. National Park Service.
Second Day of Seneca Falls Convention, July 20, 1848. Library of Congress.
Seneca Falls Convention. The Encyclopedia of New York State.
The Declaration of Sentiments, Seneca Falls Conference, 1848. Fordham University.
The Seneca Falls Convention. Library of Congress.
The Seneca Falls Convention: Setting the National Stage for Women’s Suffrage. The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

NRA all-in on Kavanaugh


 

Everytown for Gun Safety

 

The NRA is going all in to support Donald Trump’s dangerous choice for the Supreme Court. We can defeat the NRA’s extremism and stop gun violence, but only if we keep fighting in every single way. Donate now to help us thwart the NRA’s extreme agenda and their radical effort to reshape the Supreme Court.

Breitbart headline: NRA launches TV ad Supporting Brett Kavanaugh for Supreme Court

Breitbart AND the NRA want to scare Americans into thinking that if the Senate doesn’t confirm a nominee with the extreme views of Brett Kavanaugh, then the Second Amendment will be ABOLISHED. That is simply false and part of the scare tactics the NRA uses to push their extreme “guns everywhere” vision for America. Our vision is different. Donate now to continue our fight to stop gun violence and create an America with safer and stronger communities.

DONATE TO STOP NRA’S SUPREME COURT PICK

Chris Cox, the NRA’s chief lobbyist, expounds on the “dangers” America faces if Kavanaugh isn’t confirmed. The NRA continues to go to great lengths to spread misinformation and scare Americans. But we know that Chris Cox and the NRA’s extreme leadership (and their close relationship with President Trump) are the real dangers to America. Donate now to help fight the NRA’s extreme “guns everywhere” vision and extreme Supreme Court choice.

Thank you for your support to defeat Trump’s Supreme Court pick and the NRA’s extreme agenda.

NRA Alert
Everytown for Gun Safety

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