BUDGET: Continuing Mis-Appropriation


The Progress Report

The battle over the 2011 federal budget has degenerated into a game in which Republicans move the parameters of negotiations in order to slash ever deeper into programs which aid middle-class Americans and others in need, while also targeting measures that support the economic recovery. So far, a series of continuing resolutions have provided temporary stop-gap funding, thus warding off a shutdown, but that option appears spent. On Tuesday, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) said, “Time is up here,” and that he would not support “a short-term CR without a long-term commitment.” The question of budget riders is also coming to a head, with Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) flatly refusing to allow Republican provisions that would defund health care reform and Planned Parenthood, among other programs. Meanwhile, Democrats offer increasing capitulations on the budget number, chasing the tail of Republican demands. The outlines of a possible deal have emerged, but if that falls through, then the threat of a government shutdown is waiting in the wings. Perhaps summing up the sentiments best, House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) reassured nervous Republicans by bluntly asserting that, if they hold the line, “We’re gonna kick their ass.”

UNPOPULIST REVOLT: The strange saga of the 2011 budget began with a February proposal by the House Republicans to cut $32 billion relative to current spending levels. This fell short of the cuts originally demanded by the incoming freshman Tea Partiers, but at the time, even the Republican leadership did not have the stomach for such extreme reductions. Tea Party congressmen, apparently unfazed by whatever concerns were holding back their leadership, forced the Republicans to pass a budget, H.R. 1, a budget with $57 billion in cuts. In fact, the Tea Party stance has become so unforgiving that a strange good-cop-bad-cop split has emerged in which Eric Cantor has begun parroting the Tea Party line while John Boehner has presented the face of negotiation, attempting to work around the extremists in his own party. As for the Democrats, they understandably balked at the $57 billion figure, and along with the White House, have floated a compromise offer of approximately $30 billion in further cuts. But this does not appear sufficient to satisfy the Republicans’ far right. Nor has the Democrats’ proposal to expand the cuts beyond non-defense discretionary spending made much headway. One top Republican aide went so far as to state, “This debate has always been about discretionary spending — not autopilot ‘mandatory’ spending or tax hikes.”

BLEEDING THE MOST VULNERABLE: Republicans are singling out non-defense discretionary spending, which provides the most support to the middle-class. The cuts in the H.R. 1 slash funding for transportation infrastructure, workplace safety, regulation of commodity and energy speculation, and inspections for food, drugs, and consumer products. They also bite deeply into security for railroads, ports, subways and air travel, cut $1.3 billion from local law enforcement, reduce funds for drinking-water infrastructure, threaten to deny 9.4 million individuals Pell grants, and even cut the budget for programs to counter the international proliferation of nuclear weapons. As for the poor, a recent report by the poverty reduction campaign Half In Ten found within H.R. 1 a laundry list of assaults on our society’s most vulnerable members. They include: denying 10,000 low-income veterans housing vouchers and cutting off 218,000 low-income children from early learning opportunities provided by Head Start. Job training and other employment services for 8 million people are also eliminated, as are hundreds of millions of dollars for assistance to dislocated workers, career pathway grants for community colleges, low-income community development, FEMA’s emergency food and shelter funds, community health centers, prenatal and postnatal care for low-income women, and preventative health care for low-income families. And all this while corporate profits are near record highs, the richest fifth of Americans lay claim to half the nation’s income, and unemployment remains at 9 percent. In fact, Half In Ten’s report concluded the GOP‘s cuts could push the unemployment rate back up to 10 percent, Goldman Sachs economists predicted a 1.5 to 2 percentage point drop in economic growth, and Moody’s Mark Zandi predicted 400,000 fewer jobs by the end of 2011 if cuts were enacted.

THE AGONY AND THE IRONY: As of this writing, hints have emerged that negotiations between Republicans and Democrats may have reopened over the $30 billion figure, placing the budget right back where the Republicans had originally proposed. But even $30 billion in cuts would still deal a severe blow to the American economy, the middle-class and millions of the country’s least fortunate citizens — all while leaving intact enormously expensive tax cuts for the wealthy and tax expenditures which have allowed major American corporations to get away with paying to taxes at all. As such, even this “relatively” mild outcome would hurt too many Americans. A sound alternative put forward by Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), which would have attempted to reset the budget debates for 2011, 2012 and beyond by opening up other spending cuts and revenue increases as options, has been left on the cutting room floor. And in a bitter irony, the Democrats’ willingness to bend over backwards has thoroughly put the lie to what has been one of the Republicans’ main talking points: that if a shutdown does occur, it will be due to the Democrats’ intransigence.

RAN:Against all odds -Rebecca Tarbotton, Rainforest Action Network


Some days I feel like the impossible is happening right in front of my eyes. Against insurmountable odds, small groups of people really can make incredible change.

Less than a year ago—with you by our side—RAN took on the U.S. children’s publishing industry. We confronted massive, well established publishers, like Simon & Schuster and Penguin. Sure, these publishers have a couple hundred times our staff and resources—but that’s never stopped RAN from taking on a fight.

Together, we got the top eight publishers in the country to make significant commitments to protect Indonesia‘s rainforests. We are winning.

That’s the difference your support makes—and that’s why I’m asking you to show that support today by making a donation to RAN.

We’ve just got two stubborn publishers left to go in this fight—Disney and HarperCollins. Ironic that the companies that have profited from The Jungle Book and The Giving Tree are the last ones left standing in the fight to get rainforest destruction out of kids’ books. We need your support today to tackle these final contenders.

I know we’re making a difference, and I know it’s because of you. I can’t actually express just how much your support means to Rainforest Action Network and the survival of forests around the world. So I’ll just keep it simple. Thank you.

For the planet,

 Rebecca Tarbotton

Executive Director

Up Close and Personal at the Supreme Court …a message from Fatima Goss Graves


As I sat in the Great Hall of the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday and watched the lead attorney for Betty Dukes, the former Wal-Mart greeter, argue on behalf of her and the other women of Wal-Mart, I was more certain than ever that their cause is just and must prevail. Wal-Mart v. Dukes illuminates the fact that equal pay and a fair shot at promotion are still a dream for many working women across the country.

Please help support the Center’s efforts on behalf of the women at Wal-Mart and all women and girls nationwide.

As you may know, the National Women’s Law Center co-authored an amicus brief in Wal-Mart v. Dukes on behalf of 32 other organizations, setting out why the sexist treatment of Wal-Mart’s female employees was clearly discriminatory and why the case is so important to working women everywhere.

If the Supreme Court gives the green light to the women of Wal-Mart to proceed as a class, as it should, it will mean that these women, who first filed their lawsuit 10 years ago, will have their day in court at last. They will finally have the chance to equalize pay and promotions at the country’s largest employer. And the Supreme Court will send an important message that no company is too big or too powerful to be held accountable.

Several years ago, the Center led a coalition pressing Congress to pass the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, and today that legislation is the law of the land. Now the Center is continuing the fight for fair pay. Through our work on the Wal-Mart case, advocacy, public education and much more, the Center will not rest until the job is done.

Please help support the Center’s efforts on behalf of fair pay for women and all the other issues on which we work.

On behalf of women and families everywhere, thank you for your generous help.

Sincerely,

Fatima Goss Graves

Vice President for Education and Employment

National Women’s Law Center

P.S. Please donate today. And you can also watch Center Co-President Marcia Greenberger discussing the case on ABC Weekend News, NBC Nightly News, and PBS NewsHour.

Investigat​e & Stop Forced Virginity Testing of Egyptian Women …


I’m sure you are aware of the uprisings in Egypt, and now “virginity tests” are being forced on peaceful female protesters by the Egyptian military. This is an act of torture, a weapon of war, used to degrade women into compliance. Saying nothing is to condone it. Join Amnesty International to demand an investigation and stop forced virginity testing.

Don Hazen

Executive Editor, AlterNet

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Amnesty International USA

Dear Supporter

Egypt‘s military may have just hit a disturbing, new low. At least 18 women who were arrested during a peaceful protest in Tahrir Square on March 9 were forced to take “virginity tests.”

http://act.alternet.org/go/5911?akid=6750.231355.OgYO32&t=4

Women were threatened with prostitution charges if they “failed” virginity tests. One woman, who said she was a virgin but whose test supposedly proved otherwise, was beaten and given electric shocks.

Make no doubt about it, this is torture. The purpose of this test is to degrade women because they are women. Unacceptable.

DEMAND Egyptian officials investigate allegations and stop this shocking, degrading treatment of women. Call on Secretary Clinton to use her influence to demand immediate action.

The protests that began on January 25th did not occur so that Egypt could replace the shocking and degrading behavior by one regime with that of another.

Call for an immediate investigation into the forced ‘virginity testing’ and other acts of torture and ill-treatment committed against women in Egypt.

Egyptian women took a stand to demand an end to repression.

Stand with Egyptian Women — Investigate & Stop Forced Virginity Testing!

http://act.alternet.org/go/5911?akid=6750.231355.OgYO32&t=4

In Solidarity,

Geoffrey Mock

Country Specialist, Egypt

Amnesty International USA

what is going on in Congress … the Republican led House -the Senate


The Senate Convened at 9:30amET March 31, 2011

Following any leader remarks, the Senate will proceed to a period of morning business with Senators permitted to speak therein for up to 10 minutes each with the first hour equally divided and controlled between the two leaders or their designees with the Majority controlling the first 30 minutes and the Republicans controlling the next 30 minutes.

Senators will be notified when votes are scheduled.

 Unanimous Consent:

Adopted the following resolutions:

S.Res.120, 1 year anniversary 4/2/10 fire and explosion – Tesoro refinery in Anacorte, WA;

S.Res.121, designating April 2011 as “Financial Literacy Month”;

S.Res.122, honoring the life and legacy of Elizabeth Taylor; and

S.Res.123, commending ACHIEVA on its 60th anniversary.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CURRENT HOUSE FLOOR PROCEEDINGS

LEGISLATIVE DAY OF MARCH 31, 2011

112TH CONGRESS – FIRST SESSION

8:56 P.M. –

The House adjourned. The next meeting is scheduled for 9:00 a.m. on April 1, 2012.

On motion to adjourn Agreed to by voice vote.

Mr. Mica moved that the House do now adjourn.

8:55 P.M. –

APPOINTMENT OF OFFICIAL OBJECTORS – On behalf of the Majority and Minority Leaderships, the Chair announced that the official objectors for the Private Calendar for the 112th Congress were as follows: For the Majority: Messrs. Smith (TX), Sensenbrenner (WI), and Poe (TX). For the Minority: Messrs. Serrano (NY), Nadler (NY), and Edwards (MD).

H.R. 658:

to amend title 49, United States Code, to authorize appropriations for the Federal Aviation Administration for fiscal years 2011 through 2014, to streamline programs, create efficiencies, reduce waste, and improve aviation safety and capacity, to provide stable funding for the national aviation system, and for other purposes

8:53 P.M. –

Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union rises leaving H.R. 658 as unfinished business.

On motion that the Committee rise Agreed to by voice vote.

Mr. Mica moved that the Committee rise.

8:52 P.M. –

By unanimous consent, the Moore amendment was withdrawn.

8:45 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Moore (WI) amendment no. 32.

Amendment offered by Ms. Moore.

An amendment numbered 32 printed in House Report 112-46 to give the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) the authority to conduct demonstration projects at five airports in support of “aerotropolis” zones that assist in better coordinating transportation around airports and funding of projects to reduce congestion, improve, and increase the flow of freight and passengers to and through the airport through multiple transportation modes.

8:44 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Schiff amendment Agreed to by voice vote.

8:41 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Schiff amendment no. 31.

Amendment offered by Mr. Schiff.

An amendment numbered 31 printed in House Report 112-46 to include sense of Congress language that the operator of Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) should consult with representatives of the community surrounding LAX regarding airport operations and expansion plans.

8:40 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Matheson amendment Agreed to by voice vote.

8:35 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Matheson amendment no. 30.

Amendment offered by Mr. Matheson.

An amendment numbered 30 printed in House Report 112-46 to allow the Transportation Department to release any terms, conditions, reservations, or restrictions on deeds which the United States conveyed to an airport, city, county property for airport purposes, as long as the release results in furthering other airport purposes.

8:34 P.M. –

POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Schiff amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote announced that the noes had prevailed. Mr. Schiff demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.

8:24 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Schiff amendment no. 29.

Amendment offered by Mr. Schiff.

An amendment numbered 29 printed in House Report 112-46 to allow Bob Hope and Van Nuys Airports in southern California to adopt curfews from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m., alleviating air traffic noise for residents of the San Fernando Valley. It simplifies the process for these airports to implement a curfew by allowing airports that already had at least a partial curfew in effect before the 1990 Airport Noise and Capacity Act (PL 101-58) to implement mandatory nighttime curfews.

8:23 P.M. –

POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Pearce amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the ayes had prevailed. Mr. Rahall demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.

8:15 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Pearce amendment no. 27.

Amendment offered by Mr. Pearce.

An amendment numbered 27 printed in House Report 112-46 to authorize an equitable transfer of land and property, in the form of a road, between Dona Ana County in New Mexico and Verde Corporate Realty Services. Dona Ana County would continue to use the land for airport purposes.

8:14 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Graves (MO) amendment Agreed to by voice vote.

8:11 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Graves (MO) amendment no. 26.

Amendment offered by Mr. Graves (MO).

An amendment numbered 26 printed in House Report 112-46 to prohibit the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) from destroying vintage aircraft type certificate data and to require such data to be made available to the public, for non-commercial purposes, upon a Freedom of Information Act request.

8:10 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Moore amendment Agreed to by voice vote.

8:07 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Moore (WI) amendment no. 25.

Amendment offered by Ms. Moore.

An amendment numbered 25 printed in House Report 112-46 to require the Transportation Department Inspector General to report to Congress on the number of new small business concerns, including those owned by veterans and other disadvantaged groups, that participate in the projects carried out throughout the duration of the reauthorization bill. The report would list the top 25 and bottom 25 large- and medium-hub airports using such small businesses, assess the reasons why airports have been successful in using such small businesses and make recommendations to the FAA and Congress on how those successes can be replicated.

8:06 P.M. –

POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Shuster amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the ayes had prevailed. Mr. Rahall demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of the adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.

7:57 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Shuster amendment no. 24.

Amendment offered by Mr. Shuster.

An amendment numbered 24 printed in House Report 112-46 to improve Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rulemaking activities by requiring the Agency to recognize that the United States aviation industry is composed of a variety of different segments with different operating characteristics and requiring the FAA to tailor regulations to address the unique characteristics of each industry segment. The amendment also requires the FAA to conduct appropriate cost/benefit studies on all proposed regulations and only enact regulations upon a finding that the costs are justified by the benefits.

7:56 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Waxman amendment Agreed to by voice vote.

7:54 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Waxman amendment no. 23.

Amendment offered by Mr. Waxman.

An amendment numbered 23 printed in House Report 112-46 to encourage the FAA to work with the City of Santa Monica to achieve safety improvements at Santa Monica Airport, a general aviation facility that has no runway safety areas.

7:53 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Graves (MO) amendment Agreed to by voice vote.

7:45 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Graves (MO) amendment no. 22.

Amendment offered by Mr. Graves (MO).

An amendment numbered 22 printed in House Report 112-46 to provide relief for an air show in Cleveland, Ohio from complying with certain airspace restrictions.

7:44 P.M. –

POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the LaTorette amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the ayes had prevailed. Mr. Mica demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.

7:34 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the LaTourette amendment no. 21.

7:33 P.M. –

Amendment offered by Mr. LaTourette.

An amendment numbered 21 printed in House Report 112-46 to strike section 903. Section 903 repeals a National Mediation Board (NMB) rule, finalized last year, which provides for union representation elections among airline and railroad workers covered by the Railway Labor Act.

7:32 P.M. –

POSTPONED POSTPONED – At the conclusion of debate on the Sessions amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the ayes had prevailed. Mr. Sessions demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.

7:23 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Sessions amendment no. 20.

Amendment offered by Mr. Sessions.

An amendment numbered 20 printed in House Report 112-46 to prevent any funds from this act to be used to administer or enforce Davis Bacon.

7:22 P.M. –

By unanimous consent, the Graves (MO) amendment was withdrawn.

7:17 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Graves (MO) amendment no. 19.

7:16 P.M. –

Amendment offered by Mr. Graves (MO).

An amendment numbered 19 printed in House Report 112-46 to clarify Congressional intent of 49 U.S.C. 40116(d)(2)(A)(iv) to prohibit taxes on businesses located at an airport when such revenue is not used for airport purposes.

7:15 P.M. –

The House resolved into Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union for further consideration.

Considered as unfinished business.

7:12 P.M. –

Mr. Woodall filed a report from the Committee on Rules on H. Res. 194.

H.R. 658:

to amend title 49, United States Code, to authorize appropriations for the Federal Aviation Administration for fiscal years 2011 through 2014, to streamline programs, create efficiencies, reduce waste, and improve aviation safety and capacity, to provide stable funding for the national aviation system, and for other purposes

Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union rises leaving H.R. 658 as unfinished business.

7:11 P.M. –

On motion that the Committee now rise Agreed to by voice vote.

Mr. Woodall moved that the Committee now rise.

7:10 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Gingrey (GA) amendment Failed by recorded vote: 195 – 227 (Roll no. 212).

7:06 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Capuano amendment Failed by recorded vote: 187 – 235 (Roll no. 211).

7:02 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Hirono amendment Failed by recorded vote: 174 – 241 (Roll no. 210).

6:59 P.M. –

On agreeing to the DeFazio amendment Failed by recorded vote: 161 – 263 (Roll no. 209).

6:55 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Garrett amendment Failed by recorded vote: 120 – 303 (Roll no. 208).

6:48 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Mica amendment Agreed to by recorded vote: 251 – 168 (Roll no. 207).

6:26 P.M. –

UNFINIHSED BUSINESS – The Chair announced that the unfinished business was the question on adoption of amendments which had been debated earlier and on which further proceedings had been postponed.

6:25 P.M. –

POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Gingrey amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the ayes had prevailed. Mr. Costello demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.

6:18 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Gingrey amendment no. 18.

Amendment offered by Mr. Gingrey (GA).

An amendment numbered 18 printed in House Report 112-46 to prohibit FAA employees from using official–taxpayer sponsored–time for union activities during the official work day. It would not repeal the right of any FAA employee to collectively bargain or arbitrate.

6:17 P.M. –

POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Capuano amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the noes had prevailed. Mr. Capuano demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.

6:12 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Capuano amendment no. 17.

6:11 P.M. –

Amendment offered by Mr. Capuano.

An amendment numbered 17 printed in House Report 112-46 to require greater disclosure of a passenger’s baggage fees when a fare is quoted to an airline passenger and require refunds for baggage that is lost, damaged, or delayed. The Secretary of Transportation would prescribe any requirements necessary to implement the baggage fee disclosures by ensuring that necessary information is shared between carriers and ticket agents that have an already existing agency appointment or contract.

On agreeing to the Richardson amendment Failed by voice vote.

6:03 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Richardson amendment no. 16.

Amendment offered by Ms. Richardson.

An amendment numbered 16 printed in House Report 112-46 to require air carriers to provide an option for passengers to receive a notification via electronic service if there are any changes to the status of their flight.

6:02 P.M. –

By unanimous consent, the Schweikert amendment was withdrawn.

5:55 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Schweikert amendment no. 15.

Amendment offered by Mr. Schweikert.

An amendment numbered 15 printed in House Report 112-46 to allow airlines currently operating out of DCA to convert flights to and from large hub airports located within the DCA perimeter to any airport outside of the DCA perimeter.

5:54 P.M. –

By unanimous consent, the Pierluisi amendment was withdrawn.

5:49 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Pierluisi amendment no. 14.

Amendment offered by Mr. Pierluisi.

An amendment numbered 14 printed in House Report 112-46 to authorize the Secretary of Transportation to continue the essential air service program in Puerto Rico following the sunset date of October 1, 2013. The bill authorizes continuation for Alaska and Hawaii.

On agreeing to the Woodall amendment Agreed to by voice vote.

5:47 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Woodall amendment.

5:46 P.M. –

Amendment offered by Mr. Woodall.

An amendment numbered 13 printed in House Report 112-46 to prohibit implementation by the FAA of a new rule interpretation relating to 14 CFR 135, sections 263 and 267(d) so far as it relates to air ambulances and air cargo charter pilot rest requirements. Sets the interpretation of those sections at the state they were on January 1, 2011.

On agreeing to the Miller (MI) amendment Agreed to by voice vote.

5:39 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Miller (MI) amendment.

Amendment offered by Mrs. Miller (MI).

An amendment numbered 12 printed in House Report 112-46 to direct the FAA to work with various federal agencies to integrate Unmanned Aerial Systems into the National Airspace System more expeditiously.

By unanimous consent, the Jackson Lee (TX) amendment was withdrawn.

5:31 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Jackson Lee amendment.

Amendment offered by Ms. Jackson Lee (TX).

An amendment numberedd 11 printed in House Report 112-46 to require a minimum of three on duty air traffic controllers.

5:30 P.M. –

POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Hirono amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the noes had prevailed. Ms. Hirono demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.

5:21 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Hirono amendment no.10.

Amendment offered by Ms. Hirono.

An amendment numbered 10 printed in House Report 112-46 to establish an Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC) to study and provide regulatory recommendations to the Federal Aviation Administrator to ensure that all certified aircraft is properly equipped with technology that maintains pilot visibility when dense, continuous smoke is present in the cockpit. The ARC would be directed to complete its work in one year and provide its recommendations to the Administrator who must inform Congress of the recommendations and outline what actions the agency will take on the basis of those recommendations.

POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the DeFazio amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the noes had prevailed. Mr. DeFazio demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.

5:11 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the DeFazio amendment.

Amendment offered by Mr. DeFazio.

An amendment numbered 9 printed in House Report 112-46 to require mechanics at contract repair stations certificated by the Federal Aviation Administration in the U.S. and in foreign countries to undergo the same criminal background checks required for mechanics and other aviation employees at U.S. airports.

5:10 P.M. –

POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Garrett (NJ) amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the noes had prevailed. Mr. Garrett (NJ) demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.

4:59 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Garrett (NJ) amendment.

Amendment offered by Mr. Garrett.

An amendment numbered 7 printed in House Report 112-46 to require the FAA to study alternatives to the New York/New Jersey/Philadelphia airspace redesign to reduce delays at the 4 airports included in the redesign. Would also prohibit the FAA from continuing with the implementation of the airspace redesign until the study is submitted to Congress.

On agreeing to the LoBiondo amendment Agreed to by voice vote.

4:56 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the LoBiondo amendment.

Amendment offered by Mr. LoBiondo.

An amendment numbered 6 printed in House Report 112-46 to allow the FAA to assist in establishing a NextGen Research and Development Center of Excellence. The Center would leverage the FAA’s existing centers of excellence program, a program that relies on several university consortia to address ongoing FAA research and development challenges. The Center would provide educational, technical, and analytical assistance to the FAA and other agencies involved in the development of NextGen.

4:55 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Neugebauer amendment Agreed to by voice vote.

4:48 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Neugebauer amendment.

Amendment offered by Mr. Neugebauer.

An amendment numbered 5 printed in House Report 112-46 to direct the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration to conduct a feasibility study on the development of an online public resource that would list the location and height of potential low-altitude aviation obstructions, such as guy-wire and free-standing towers. Would also give the Administrator one year to conduct the study and report to Congress.

4:47 P.M. –

On agreeing to the Hirono amendment Agreed to by voice vote.

4:39 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Hirono amendment.

Amendment offered by Ms. Hirono.

An amendment numbered 4 printed in House Report 112-46 to exempt Hawaii’s large and medium hub airports from collecting PFCs from interisland travelers due to the unique everyday travel circumstances the island state presents. Would also change the formula under which Hawaii’s annual federal apportionments are reduced when the State’s large and medium hub airports collect passenger facility charges from overseas travelers.

On agreeing to the Pierluisi amendment Agreed to by voice vote.

4:32 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Pierluisi amendment.

Amendment offered by Mr. Pierluisi.

An amendment numbered 3 printed in House Report 112-46 to ensure that airports in Puerto Rico are apportioned amounts under the Airport Improvement Program (AlP), while also remaining eligible for discretionary grants under the Program.

4:31 P.M. –

By unanimous consent, the Waters amendment was withdrawn.

4:25 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Waters amendment.

Amendment offered by Ms. Waters.

An amendment numbered 2 printed in House Report 112-46 to require airport operators, as a condition for receiving grants under the Airport Improvement Program, to consult with representatives of the community surrounding the airport regarding airport operations and their impact on the community.

4:24 P.M. –

POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS – At the conclusion of debate on the Mica amendment, the Chair put the question on adoption of the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the ayes had prevailed. Mr. Rahall demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed further proceedings on the question of adoption of the amendment until a time to be announced.

4:13 P.M. –

DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 189, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Mica amendment.

Amendment offered by Mr. Mica.

An amendment numbered 1 printed in House Report 112-46 to make technical corrections to provisions in the underlying bill.

2:58 P.M. –

GENERAL DEBATE – The Committee of the Whole proceeded with one hour of general debate on H.R. 658.

2:57 P.M. –

The Speaker designated the Honorable Jo Ann Emerson to act as Chairwoman of the Committee.

House resolved itself into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 189 and Rule XVIII.

2:55 P.M. –

Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 658 with 1 hour of general debate. Previous question shall be considered as ordered without intervening motions except motion to recommit with or without instructions. Measure will be considered read. Specified amendments are in order. In lieu of the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure now printed in the bill, it shall be in order to consider as an original bill for the purpose of amendment under the five-minute rule an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of the Rules Committee Print dated March 22, 2011.

Considered under the provisions of rule H. Res. 189.

H.R. 872:

to amend the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act to clarify Congressional intent regarding the regulation of the use of pesticides in or near navigable waters, and for other purposes

2:54 P.M. –

Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.

On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (2/3 required): 292 – 130 (Roll no. 206).

2:46 P.M. –

Considered as unfinished business.

H. Res. 189:

providing for consideration of the bill ( H.R. 658) to amend title 49, United States Code, to authorize appropriations for the Federal Aviation Administration for fiscal years 2011 through 2014, to streamline programs, create efficiencies, reduce waste, and improve aviation safety and capacity, to provide stable funding for the national aviation system, and for other purposes

2:45 P.M. –

On agreeing to the resolution Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: 249 – 171 (Roll no. 205).

Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.

2:22 P.M. –

The previous question was ordered without objection.

1:25 P.M. –

DEBATE – The House proceeded with one hour of debate on H. Res. 189.

1:23 P.M. –

Considered as privileged matter.

12:38 P.M. –

POINT OF PERSONAL PRIVILEGE – Pursuant to clause 1 of rule IX, Mr. Kucinich rose to a point of personal privilege and was recognized by the Chair to proceed for one hour.

12:37 P.M. –

INVESTIGATIVE SUBCOMMITTEES OF THE COMMITTEE ON ETHICS – Pursuant to Clause 5(a)(4)(A) of Rule X, and the order of the House of January 5, 2011, the Speaker appointed Mr. Bishop of Utah, Mrs. Blackburn of Tennessee, Mr. Crenshaw of Florida, Mr. Latham of Iowa, Mr. Simpson of Idaho, Mr. Walden of Oregon, Mr. Olson of Texas, Mr. Latta of Ohio, Mr. Griffin of Arkansas, and Mr. Grimm of New York to be available to serve on Investigative Subcommittees of the Committee on Ethics for the 112th Congress .

12:12 P.M. –

ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with one minute speeches, which by direction of the Chair would be limited to 15 per side of the aisle.

12:09 P.M. –

PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE – The Chair designated Mr. Coffman of CO to lead the Members in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.

The Speaker announced approval of the Journal. Pursuant to clause 1, rule I, the Journal stands approved.

12:08 P.M. –

Today’s prayer was offered by Reverend Dr. Charles Jackson, Sr., Brookland Baptist Church, West Columbia, South Carolina.

12:07 P.M. –

The House convened, returning from a recess continuing the legislative day of March 31.

10:45 A.M. –

The Speaker announced that the House do now recess. The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 P.M. today.

10:01 A.M. –

MORNING-HOUR DEBATE – The House proceeded with Morning-Hour Debate. At the conclusion of Morning-Hour, the House will recess until 12:00 p.m. for the start of legislative business.

10:00 A.M. –

The Speaker designated the Honorable Virginia Foxx to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.

The House convened, starting a new legislative day.