no time for golf … says trump …as we leave 2017 remember #midterm2018matters


hmmm he has spent approx #31Mil … taxpayer dollars

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Seattle Minimum Wage – $15 Jan. 1, 2017


Seattle Minimum Wage – $15 Jan. 1, 2017

We are working to ensure our member restaurants have support navigating the new $15 minimum wage. We continue to evaluate its impacts, but there is evidence the business model is evolving in Seattle to address the new minimum wage and other ordinances within the city.  You can read the FAQ about the Seattle minimum wage ordinance provided by the Seattle Department of Labor Standards here.

Employees are our greatest asset and we are committed to complying with the law while seeking to balance equality for our employees who work in the dining room and the kitchen.

Large/Small Employer Timetables (click images to enlarge)

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UW Study

From 2015 to 2016, the University of Washington was hired to do a study of impacts the increased wage had on the city. According to the report, Seattle businesses made these changes:

  • 62% raised prices on goods/services,
  • 30% added service charges or fees,
  • 30% reduced their number of employees, and
  • 11% left Seattle.

Service Charges

Implementing services charges is one solution many businesses have considered. If you are considering a service charge please read our HERO manual page 35-37. These two pages offer in-depth answers to tricky questions and what the legal requirements are regarding service charges. The HERO manual is a free membership benefit. You can also read our article and FAQ on service charges (with examples).

How some restaurants in Washington are handling service charges:

– Maximilien Service Charge Webpost

– Tom Douglas Service Charge Model Letter (PDF)

– Ivar’s Explanation of Cost Increase and Tipping Changes

– Iron Rabbit goes Tipless and Institutes a Service Charge (article)

 

Past e-edition articles:

1. Tips

2. Schedule 1 or Schedule 2 employers

3. Service Charges

4. Posting Requirements

5. More on Tips

6. Other Compensation: Health Care

7. Other Compensation: Commissions & Bonuses

8. Crash Course

Resources:

– Minimum Wage Guide

– Exhibit 1 – Seattle wage law poster (English, Spanish, Amharic)

– Exhibit 2 – Sample letter to employees at time of hire

– Exhibit 3 – Sample letter to current employees

– Exhibit 4 – Schedule 1 (large) employers wage payment chart

– Exhibit 5 – Schedule 2 (small) employers wage payment chart

– Exhibit 6 – State overtime guide

urban renewal, rebuilding while displacing … gentrification! are you feelin it too


  2018 and Gentrification is still a reality

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Definition of GENTRIFICATION …

Gentrification is a general term for the arrival of wealthier people in an existing urban district, a related increase in rents and property values, and changes in the district’s character and culture. The term is often used negatively, suggesting the displacement of poor communities by rich outsiders. pbs.org

Listening to the local news, reports are that the Seattle City Council is building a New police precinct to replace the old one. ok, Then we hear the cost started out being $160Mil is now around some lesser million dollar amount but what we all need to know is gentrification is also about being and staying woke while voting.  The idea that Seattle would consider building one of the most expensive police precinct ever …wait -let me change that, it would be the most expensive in the nation is beyond comprehension let alone give up what used to work! … diversion programs

yep, it is a WTF moment.

Oh, and let’s top that off with a city that seemed more on the side of troubled youth using diversion programs back in the day, it has or is deciding to invest in the “school to prison pipeline.” … Private Prisons are known to bring in revenue but do we have to do this and why?

This plan seems like a betrayal to the residents of this great city.  Why can’t they rebuild on the old site least we ask why we should put up with this when there is a major lack of housing whether it’s affordable or not and from just reading about this move … Seattle is suffering from what appears to be secrets, lies and closed door meetings, well until that last public hearing. To say Seattleites are pissed at some of those folks we trusted and voted for is crazy while gentrification seems to be in full effect. This news seems in conflict with what Seattle is about or used to be, not to mention the proposals for affordable housing being considered, discussed, possibly implemented. The plan was or is to have developers, who want to build here put money or a %  into a fund that will help pay for affordable housing or for that new “Police Precinct”?  What I want to know is if this is retroactive because while they announced the new program it doesn’t appear to be more than just a proposal to have developers pay up and common sense begs the question about how many new proposals could be in que with that stipulation …just saying

Oh and  … did you know if you want to live near the new transportation system called light rail in the Greater Seattle area; you probably will be paying approximately 10% more? I have to admit after hearing the City of Seattle admitted they actually tell property managers that IT professionals are the best tenants was very disappointing and makes you wonder… did they just admit to systematic gentrification/discrimination? The comment becomes clearer if you’re looking for what used to be affordable housing here and discussions with folks who now work or live an hour or two away taking a train or driving in or out of places like Olympia is both infuriating and sad.

The colourful yet offensive yellow, orange and sometimes blue cranes stand tall, maybe 4 or more in certain parts of this beautiful city are being built to house folks of the IT variety among other big corporations that moved into downtown Seattle; are spread out and have  seemingly taken a whole lot of green space away … all of which ultimately raises rents all over the greater Seattle area.

If that wasn’t bad enough; I don’t even understand how, but reports are that the rents in here are not just higher than New York City, but the highest in the nation and continue to increase.  If that didn’t boggle your mind as a resident, try getting to point B, C or D from A!  it’s not only frustrating to see the lack of space between buildings … it’s a cluster fk of massive buildings for sure and thinking about how many are foreign dollar driven is too much … i think about all the old timers who had homes, small biz … places etc. now gone or struggling to live seeing the vote for “the people” seemingly less and less becoming more corporate for far too long

The process of renewal and rebuilding accompanying the influx of upper-income or affluent people into deteriorating areas that often displaces poorer residents is not new. The changing faces of the Pacific North West is quite concerning … Portland,OR once 33% white in the year 2000 is now 76% white as of the year 2016. The change raises unsettling questions for a city that prides itself on tolerance, social equity and valuing diversity, which includes Seattle, WA.;Census documents reports our State was 77% white in 2014, not far behind that concern is hearing that there were are developers possibly still asking, demanding and harassing older communities of colour into selling their homes and or lands without having a place to move to in the neighborhood let alone in the city because they are priced out.  I don’t know about you but gentrification is worth fighting, but who really knew how bad it was or is? I knew that new development companies were pushing parts of the Pacific North West but got to say; not until after watching, “United Shades of America” point the finger at Portland did it become clear that Portland was indeed systematically involved in a change in the faces of their state. The 64 million dollar question is how did this happen? As someone who used to go to Portland a lot, it makes me want to scream. The idea that gentrification continues to be skillfully ignored, kept outta the airwaves and or swept under some rug… probably dirty from developers makes most feel helpless, but then again Seattle and Portland need their Democratic Governor and Mayor to tell their constituents why they haven’t addressed or solved this issue !…

Your vote matters ..make it count

maybe this new 2018 legislature will be the change we need to repeal the ugly nasty that has compromised an otherwise fabulous city and

 

Photo: using my phone ~ Nativegrl77

The Rising Minimum Wages and Tip Credits for 2017: An Overview


 

Authors: Benjamin A. Anchill (Detroit Metro), Margaret Carroll Alli (Detroit Metro)

Published Date: December 21, 2016

Effective January 1, 2017, 29 states plus the District of Columbia will have minimum wage rates that are above the federal minimum wage rate of $7.25 per hour. The District of Columbia will continue to have, as it did last year, one of the highest minimum wage rates in the country at $11.50 per hour until July 1, 2017, and $12.50 per hour after that date. With respect to state minimum wages, Massachusetts and Washington will have the highest minimum wages at $11.00 per hour effective January 1, 2017, with California close behind at $10.50 per hour (for employers with 26 or more employees), effective January 1, 2017, and Connecticut following at $10.10 per hour, effective January 1, 2017.

The states with the lowest minimum wages continue to be Georgia and Wyoming, both of which have rates of $5.15 per hour, along with Oklahoma, which allows employers that have fewer than 10 full-time employees and $100,000 or less in gross annual sales to pay $2.00 per hour to employees. Five states—Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Tennessee—have not enacted minimum wage laws. Of the 45 states plus the District of Columbia that have enacted minimum wage laws, 22 (or slightly less than one-half of them) will increase their minimum wage rates from 2016 to 2017 (up from 17 states—or just over one-third—that increased their minimum wage rates from 2015 to 2016).

The 2017 Minimum Wage

The chart below lists the minimum wage rates that will be in effect for 2017 in all 50 states and the District of Columbia and also reflects changes in state laws from 2016 to 2017. Importantly, all employers covered under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) will still be required to meet the applicable FLSA minimum hourly rate, which remains at $7.25 per hour, even if a particular state’s law allows for a lower minimum wage rate. Thus, states with minimum wage rates that are lower than $7.25 per hour must pay employees at least $7.25 per hour.

The 2017 Maximum Tip Credit

The chart also breaks down the maximum tip credit that employers can count against the hourly rates of tipped employees. The tip credit is the portion of the cash minimum wage that employers are not required to pay to employees who receive tips. The minimum wage less the applicable tip credit is the lowest wage per hour that an employer must pay its tipped employees.

All FLSA-covered employers may apply a tip credit that, generally, should be no greater than the FLSA’s maximum tip credit, which is currently set at $5.12 per hour. Employers in states with maximum tip credits that are higher than the federal maximum tip credit may be able to apply the higher tip credit only if the difference between the state minimum wage and the tip credit is at least $2.13. A more conservative approach, however, would be to adopt the lower federal maximum tip credit since it is more advantageous to employees. Employers in states that have enacted a tip credit that is lower than the federal maximum tip credit of $5.12 per hour (including states that have prohibited the payment of tip credits in their entirety) may continue to follow the more employee-friendly state law.

JURISDICTION 2017 MINIMUM WAGE 2017 MAXIMUM TIP CREDIT ALLOWED CHANGE FROM 2016
Federal $7.25 $5.12 No change
Alabama No specific minimum wage rate under state law; the $7.25 federal minimum wage rate applies No specific tip credit minimum under state law; the federal $5.12 maximum tip credit applies No change
Alaska $9.80, effective January 1, 2017 $0.00; no tip credit allowed under state law Increase
Arizona $10.00, effective January 1, 2017 $3.00 Increase
Arkansas $8.50, effective January 1, 2017 Employers should apply the maximum $5.12 federal tip credit, even though the state maximum tip credit is higher at $5.87. Increase
California $10.00 for employers with fewer than 26 employees, effective January 1, 2017 $0.00; no tip credit allowed under state law Increase for employees who work for employers with 26 or more employees
$10.50 for employers with 26 or more employees, effective January 1, 2017
Colorado $9.30, effective January 1, 2017 $3.02 Increase
Connecticut $10.10, effective January  1, 2017 $3.72 (waitpersons); $1.87 (bartenders), effective January 1, 2017 Increase
Delaware $8.25 Employers should apply the maximum $5.12 federal tip credit, even though the state maximum tip credit is higher at $6.02. No change
District of Columbia $11.50 until July 1, 2017, then $12.50 Employers should apply the maximum $5.12 federal tip credit, even though the state-imposed maximum tip credit is higher at $8.73 until July 1, 2017, and will then be $9.17. Increase
Florida $8.10, effective January 1, 2017 $3.02 Increase
Georgia The $7.25 federal minimum wage rate applies because the state minimum wage rate is lower at $5.15 for employers with six or more employees and annual sales of more than $40,000. Tipped employees are not subject to the state minimum wage rate. No change
Hawaii $9.25, effective January 1, 2017 $0.75 Increase
Idaho $7.25 $3.90 No change
Illinois $8.25 $3.30 No change
Indiana $7.25 $5.12 No change
Iowa $7.25 $2.90 No change
Kansas $7.25 $5.12 No change
Kentucky $7.25 $5.12 No change
Louisiana No specific minimum wage rate under state law; the $7.25 federal minimum wage rate applies No specific tip credit minimum under state law; the federal $5.12 maximum tip credit applies No change
Maine $9.00, effective January 1, 2017 $4.00, effective January 1, 2017 Increase
Maryland $8.75 until July 1, 2017, then $9.25 $5.12 until July 1, 2017, then $5.62, at which time employers should apply the maximum $5.12 federal tip credit, even though the state-imposed maximum tip credit effective after July 1, 2017 is higher Increase
Massachusetts $11.00, effective January 1, 2017 Employers should apply the maximum $5.12 federal tip credit, even though the state-imposed maximum tip credit is higher at $7.75, effective January 1, 2017. Increase
Michigan $8.90, effective January 1, 2017 Employers should apply the maximum $5.12 federal tip credit, even though the state-imposed maximum tip credit is higher at $5.52, effective January 1, 2017. Increase
Minnesota

 

$9.50 for employers with gross sales of $500,000 or more $0.00; no tip credit allowed under state law No change

 

$7.75 for employers with gross sales less than $500,000
Mississippi No specific minimum wage rate under state law; the $7.25 federal minimum wage rate applies No specific tip credit minimum under state law; the federal $5.12 maximum tip credit applies No change
Missouri $7.70, effective January 1, 2017 $3.85 Increase
Montana $8.15, if the employer’s annual sales are more than $110,000, effective January 1, 2017; otherwise the $7.25 federal minimum wage rate applies because the state minimum wage rate for other businesses is lower at $4.00 $0.00; no tip credit  allowed under state law Increase
Nebraska $9.00 Employers should apply the maximum $5.12 federal tip credit, even though the state-imposed maximum tip credit is higher at $6.87. No change
Nevada

 

$7.25 if the employee receives health benefits provided by the employer $0.00; no tip credit allowed under state law

 

No change

 

$8.25 if the employee does not receive health benefits provided by the employer
New Hampshire $7.25 $3.99 No change
New Jersey $8.44, effective January 1, 2017 Total wages and tips must equal at least the minimum wage. Increase
New Mexico $7.50 Employers should apply the maximum $5.12 federal tip credit, even though the state-imposed maximum tip credit is higher at $5.37. No change
New York New York City’s (NYC)  Large Employers (11 or more employees): $11.00 ($12.00 for fast food workers), effective December 31, 2016 NYC’s Large Employers: $1.85 for service employees, $3.50 for food service workers, and $0.00 for fast food workers, effective December 31, 2016 Increase
NYC’s Small Employers (10 or fewer employees): $10.50 ($12.00 for fast food workers), effective December 31, 2016 NYC’s Small Employers: $1.75 for service employees, $3.00 for food service workers, and $0.00 for fast food workers, effective December 31, 2016
Long Island and Westchester: $10.00 ($10.75 for fast food workers), effective December 31, 2016 Long Island and Westchester: $1.65 for service workers, $2.50 for food service workers, and $0.00 for fast food workers, effective December 31, 2016
Remainder of New York: $9.70 ($10.75 for fast food workers), effective December 31, 2016 Remainder of New York: $1.60 for service employees, $2.20 for food service workers, $0.00 for fast food workers, effective December 31, 2016
North Carolina $7.25 $5.12 No change
North Dakota $7.25 $2.39 No change
Ohio $8.15, if the employer’s annual gross receipts are more than $297,000, effective January 1, 2017; otherwise $7.25 $4.07 Increase
Oklahoma $7.25; the federal minimum wage rate applies because the state minimum wage is lower at $2.00 for employers with fewer than 10 full-time employees with gross annual sales of $100,000 or less $3.625 ($1.00 if the employer has fewer than 10 full-time employees with gross annual sales of $100,000 or less) No change
Oregon $9.75 until June 30, 2017, then $10.25 $0.00; no tip credit allowed under state law Increase
Pennsylvania $7.25 $4.42 No change
Rhode Island $9.60 Employers should apply the maximum $5.12 federal tip credit, even though the state-imposed maximum tip credit is higher at $5.71, effective January 1, 2017. No change
South Carolina No specific minimum wage rate under state law; the $7.25 federal minimum wage rate applies No specific tip credit minimum under state law; the federal $5.12 maximum tip credit applies No change
South Dakota $8.65, effective January 1, 2017 $4.325 Increase
Tennessee No specific minimum wage rate under state law; the $7.25 federal minimum wage rate applies No specific tip credit minimum under state law; the federal $5.12 maximum tip credit applies No change
Texas $7.25 $5.12 No change
Utah $7.25 $5.12 No change
Vermont $10.00, effective January 1, 2017 $5.00 Increase
Virginia $7.25 Employers should apply the maximum $5.12 federal tip credit, even though employers are not required to pay tipped employees a cash wage unless the employee demonstrates that tips do not equal at least the minimum wage. No change
Washington $11.00, effective January 1, 2017 $0.00; no tip credit allowed under state law Increase
West Virginia $8.75 Employers should apply the maximum $5.12 federal tip credit, even though the state-imposed maximum tip credit is higher at $6.13. No change
Wisconsin $7.25 $4.92 No change
Wyoming The $7.25 federal minimum wage rate applies because the state minimum wage rate is lower at $5.15. $3.02 No change

 

Employers may also want to be careful to take into account applicable local laws that set a higher minimum wage in certain cities or localities than the minimum wage generally applicable in the state. By way of example, the following big cities or localities currently impose minimum wages that are higher than the statewide minimum wage of the state in which they are located: New York City; Long Island and Westchester, New York; Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Francisco, California (among numerous other cities in California); Chicago and Cook County, Illinois; Montgomery and Prince George’s Counties, Maryland; Portland, Maine; Albuquerque and Santa Fe, New Mexico; and Seattle, SeaTac, and Tacoma, Washington. It is expected that this list will continue to grow in 2017.

 

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