Katherine Johnson … an Inspiration ~Lonnie Bunch, Founding Director of the NMAAHC


AN INSPIRATION TO ALL OF US
HIdden Figures.png
Katherine Johnson, Hampton, Virginia
Collection of the Smithsonian National
Museum of African American History
& Culture, Gift of Annie Leibovitz,
© Annie Leibovitz

March is Women’s History Month. And the National Museum of African American History and Culture is putting a special focus on the stories of remarkable African American women who overcame the twin barriers of racism and sexism to make their mark on our nation’s history.

Three of the notable women we’re celebrating this month are Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, NASA scientists who — as they toiled in relative obscurity and battled discrimination — helped to ensure the safety of Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts, and the success of John Glenn’s historic Friendship 7 mission in 1962. Their amazing story is recounted in the hit film Hidden Figures, based on the book of the same name by African American author Margot Lee Shetterly, whose father was also a NASA scientist.

Shortly before Hidden Figures opened in theaters, the producers chose our Museum for a special, private screening of the film. In attendance that evening were Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer and Janelle Monáe — who portrayed Johnson, Vaughn and Jackson, respectively — in addition to costar Kevin Costner, director Ted Melfi and musical superstar Pharrell Williams, who produced the movie. The event also featured remarks from former NASA Administrator Charles Frank Bolden, Jr., as well as the unveiling of a portrait of Katherine Johnson by renowned photographer Annie Leibovitz. That portrait is now part of the Museum’s collection.

With the opening of Museum, trailblazing African American women like Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson are finally receiving the recognition they so richly deserve — inspiring girls and young women everywhere to pursue their dreams. And as a supporter, you can take pride in knowing that you help bring the stories of these African American heroes — and many more — out of the shadows and into the spotlight.

Thank you for helping the National Museum of African American History and Culture elevate the African American experience to its rightful place at the center of our nation’s story!

dd-sustainerlanding-2014-lonnie-bunch.jpg All the best,
DD YE year end 1 signature
Lonnie G. Bunch III
Founding Director
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on this day … 3/31 1933 – The U.S. Congress authorized the Civilian Conservation Corps to relieve rampant unemployment.


1492 – King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain issued the Alhambra edict expelling Jews who were unwilling to convert to Christianity.

1776 – Abigail Adams wrote to her husband John that women were “determined to foment a rebellion” if the new Declaration of Independence failed to guarantee their rights.

1779 – Russia and Turkey signed a treaty concerning military action in Crimea.

1831 – Quebec and Montreal were incorporated as cities.

1854 – The U.S. government signed the Treaty of Kanagawa with Japan. The act opened the ports of Shimoda and Hakotade to American trade.

1862 – Skirmishing between Rebels and Union forces took place at Island 10 on the Mississippi River.

1870 – In Perth Amboy, NJ, Thomas Munday Peterson became the first black to vote in the U.S.

1880 – Wabash, IN, became the first town to be completely illuminated with electric light.

1885 – Binney & Smith Company was founded in New York City. The company later became Crayola, LLC.

1889 – In Paris, the Eiffel Tower officially opened.

1900 – The W.E. Roach Company was the first automobile company to put an advertisement in a national magazine. The magazine was the “Saturday Evening Post“.

1900 – In France, the National Assembly passed a law reducing the workday for women and children to 11 hours.

1901 – In Russia, the Czar lashed out at Socialist-Revolutionaries with the arrests of 72 people and the seizing of two printing presses.

1902 – In Tennessee, 22 coal miners were killed by an explosion.

1904 – In India, hundreds of Tibetans were slaughtered by the British.

1905 – Kaiser Wilhelm arrived in Tangier proclaiming to support for an independent state of Morocco.

1906 – The Conference on Moroccan Reforms in Algerciras ended after two months with France and Germany in agreement.

1906 – The Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States was founded to set rules in amateur sports. The organization became the National Collegiate Athletic Association in 1910.

1908 – 250,000 coal miners in Indianapolis, IN, went on strike to await a wage adjustment.

1909 – Serbia accepted Austrian control over Bosnia-Herzegovina.

1917 – The U.S. purchased and took possession of the Virgin Islands from Denmark for $25 million.

1918 – For the first time in the U.S., Daylight Saving Time went into effect.

1921 – Great Britain declared a state of emergency because of the thousands of coal miners on strike.

1923 – In New York City, the first U.S. dance marathon was held. Alma Cummings set a new world record of 27 hours.

1932 – The Ford Motor Co. debuted its V-8 engine.

1933 – The U.S. Congress authorized the Civilian Conservation Corps to relieve rampant unemployment.

1933 – The “Soperton News” in Georgia became the first newspaper to publish using a pine pulp paper.

1939 – Britain and France agreed to support Poland if Germany threatened invasion.

1940 – La Guardia airport in New York officially opened to the public.

1941 – Germany began a counter offensive in North Africa.

1945 – “The Glass Menagerie” by Tennessee Williams opened on Broadway.

1946 – Monarchists won the elections in Greece.

1947 – John L. Lewis called a strike in sympathy for the miners killed in an explosion in Centralia, IL, on March 25, 1947.

1948 – The Soviets in Germany began controlling the Western trains headed toward Berlin.

1949 – Winston Churchill declared that the A-bomb was the only thing that kept the U.S.S.R. from taking over Europe.

1949 – Newfoundland entered the Canadian confederation as its 10th province.

1958 – The U.S. Navy formed the atomic submarine division.

1959 – The Dalai Lama (Lhama Dhondrub, Tenzin Gyatso) began exile by crossing the border into India where he was granted political asylum. Gyatso was the 14th Daila Lama.

1960 – The South African government declared a state of emergency after demonstrations led to the death of more than 50 Africans.

1966 – An estimated 200,000 anti-war demonstrators march in New York City. (New York)

1966 – The Soviet Union launched Luna 10, which became the first spacecraft to enter a lunar orbit.

1967 – U.S. President Lyndon Johnson signed the Consular Treaty, the first bi-lateral pact with the Soviet Union since the Bolshevik Revolution.

1970 – The U.S. forces in Vietnam down a MIG-21, it was the first since September 1968.

1976 – The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that Karen Anne Quinlan could be disconnected from a respirator. Quinlan remained comatose until 1985 when she died.

1980 – U.S. President Carter deregulated the banking industry.

1981 – In Bangkok, Thailand, four of five Indonesian terrorists were killed after hijacking an airplane on March 28.

1985 – ABC-TV aired the 200th episode of “The Love Boat.”

1986 – 167 people died when a Mexicana Airlines Boeing 727 crashed in Los Angeles.

1987 – HBO (Home Box Office) earned its first Oscar for “Down and Out in America”.

1989 – Canada and France signed a fishing rights pact.

1991 – Albania offered a multi-party election for the first time in 50 years. Incumbent President Ramiz Alia won.

1991 – Iraqi forces recaptured the northern city of Kirkuk from Kurdish guerillas.

1993 – Brandon Lee was killed accidentally while filming a movie.

1994 – “Nature” magazine announced that a complete skull of Australppithecus afarensis had been found in Ethiopia. The finding is of humankind’s earliest ancestor.

1998 – U.N. Security Council imposed arms embargo on Yugoslavia.

1998 – Buddy Hackett received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

1998 – For the first time in U.S. history the federal government’s detailed financial statement was released. This occurred under the Clinton administration.

1999 – Three U.S. soldiers were captured by Yugoslav soldiers three miles from the Yugoslav border in Macedonia.

1999 – Fabio was hit in the face by a bird during a promotional ride of a new roller coaster at the Busch Gardens theme park in Williamsburg, VA. Fabio received a one-inch cut across his nose.

2000 – In Uganda, officials set the number of deaths linked to a doomsday religious cult, the Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments, at more than 900. In Kanungu, a March 17 fire at the cult’s church killed more than 530 and authorities subsequently found mass graves at various sites linked to the cult.

2004 – Air America Radio launched five stations around the U.S.

2004 – Google Inc. announced that it would be introducing a free e-mail service called Gmail.

2016 – Apple released the iPhone SE.

No way Norway! Rewan Al-Haddad – Avaaz


In a few days, Norway will start a horrific annual tradition of killing hundreds of whales. But if enough raise the alarm now we could get governments across Europe to close their ports to Norwegian ships until they agree to end the bloody slaughter of these emotional, intelligent beings! We did it before with Iceland. Add your name with one click and forward widely:

ADD YOUR NAME
In just a few days, Norway will start up a horrific annual tradition — the ruthless slaughter of hundreds of whales. But we’ve got a strategy to say ‘NO WAY!’

Whales are awe-inspiring, beautiful beings. We now know they communicate with each other in song, and experience human-like emotions. But in Norway, every year these amazing creatures are hunted down and killed, then hacked apart to become animal feed and ingredients in beauty products. It’s unbearable.

Norway has managed to slip under the radar as the #1 whale slaughtering country. But if we now rally unprecedented global outrage, we can push Europe to close its ports to Norway’s whalers. We did it with Iceland — let’s do it again! Sign the petition below with one click:

Add your name to say NO WAY! to Norway’s whaling

To the Norwegian government, the European Commission and all leaders of countries that allow Norwegian whale shipments to pass through:

As concerned global citizens we appeal to the Norwegian government to end the whale slaughter, and to all others to close your ports to Norwegian whale meat shipments. Your decision will set precedent that could save thousands of whales, and help stop whaling across Europe.

Add your name to say NO WAY! to Norway’s whaling

Our movement and our partners already got Germany and the Netherlands to move to shut their ports to Icelandic whalers, got a major Icelandic whale hunter badboy to shut down his operations, pressured the International Whaling Commission to clamp down on “scientific whaling”, and helped set a path to have 30% of our oceans protected by 2030.

Norway has got away with this mass murder for too long and the government just announced that it’s intending to double its slaughter quotas! But it is only profitable if they can export, and they rely on European ports to ship their bloody whale meat overseas.

Let’s end Norway’s trade of these magical species. When 1 million of us have joined, Avaaz will pull out all the stops to make this a PR nightmare until every port in Europe rejects them and Norway stops whaling once and for all. Add your name now and tell everyone — let’s turn up the heat to save the whales!

Add your name to say NO WAY! to Norway’s whaling

Momentum is moving towards ending this barbaric slaughter. But it’s the brutal whaling lobby vs. us — we need to sing for the whales as they cannot defend themselves. Let’s make this so loud we can’t be ignored and help end whaling for good.

With hope,

Rewan, Caroline, Diego, Allison, Emma, Danny, Alice and the entire Avaaz team

MORE INFORMATION

No fin whales to be hunted in Iceland this summer (The Guardian)
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/feb/25/no-fin-whales-to-be-hunted-in-iceland-this-summer

How Norway quietly became a whaling powerhouse (CS Monitor)
http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2016/0614/How-Norway-quietly-became-a-whaling-powerhouse

90% of Minke Whales Killed in Norway Are Female and ‘Almost All’ Pregnant (EcoWatch)
http://www.ecowatch.com/minke-whales-killed-pregnant-2312849367.html

Norway’s Whaling Program Just Got Even More Controversial (National Geographic)
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/03/160331-norway-minke-whaling-fur-farms/

Frozen in Time – How Modern Norway clings to its whaling past (Ocean Care)
https://oceancare.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Report_Walfang_OC_AWI_PW_Frozen-in-time_EN_2016.pdf

Support the Paycheck Fairness Act … Tell Members of Congress


It’s down to the wire.

We need your help to ensure that as many Members of Congress as possible sign on as co-sponsors of the Paycheck Fairness Act by Equal Pay Day on Tuesday.

Take Action: Tell Your Members of Congress to Co-Sponsor the Paycheck Fairness Act

On Equal Pay Day, some politicians talk a good game about their support of equal pay without actually endorsing the policies that would help close the wage gap. We need to send a clear message that empty talk is not enough. We need our Members of Congress to take a firm stand by publicly supporting the Paycheck Fairness Act, which is a strong bill to address the wage gap on multiple fronts.

What would the Paycheck Fairness Act do?

This bill would deter wage discrimination by updating and strengthening the Equal Pay Act, including by barring retaliation against workers who disclose their own wages to co-workers—such as firing employees for talking about their salaries. And new this year, the bill would also prohibit employers from seeking a job applicant’s salary history so that pay discrimination will no longer follow women and people of color from job to job.

It’s time for our Members of Congress to do more than say nice things about equal pay.

Tell them to co-sponsor the Paycheck Fairness Act before Equal Pay Day.

Tuesday, April 4, is Equal Pay Day this year. It marks the day that the typical woman’s wages finally catch up to those of her male counterparts from the previous year. With the Paycheck Fairness Act, we can start to close the gap. Tell your Members of Congress to co-sponsor the bill today.

Thanks for joining We the Resistance’s fight to achieve equal pay.

In solidarity,
Emily Martin
General Counsel and Vice President for Workplace Justice
National Women’s Law Center

 

We the Resistance is our fight to protect our rights and freedoms and to defend the most vulnerable among us through powerful collective action. Every conversation you have with a loved one about the issues important to you, every call you make to Congress, every rally you attend is a part of that resistance. Join us—sign on to the We The Resistance manifesto.