Katherine Johnson … an Inspiration ~Lonnie Bunch, Founding Director of the NMAAHC


AN INSPIRATION TO ALL OF US
HIdden Figures.png
Katherine Johnson, Hampton, Virginia
Collection of the Smithsonian National
Museum of African American History
& Culture, Gift of Annie Leibovitz,
© Annie Leibovitz

March is Women’s History Month. And the National Museum of African American History and Culture is putting a special focus on the stories of remarkable African American women who overcame the twin barriers of racism and sexism to make their mark on our nation’s history.

Three of the notable women we’re celebrating this month are Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, NASA scientists who — as they toiled in relative obscurity and battled discrimination — helped to ensure the safety of Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts, and the success of John Glenn’s historic Friendship 7 mission in 1962. Their amazing story is recounted in the hit film Hidden Figures, based on the book of the same name by African American author Margot Lee Shetterly, whose father was also a NASA scientist.

Shortly before Hidden Figures opened in theaters, the producers chose our Museum for a special, private screening of the film. In attendance that evening were Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer and Janelle Monáe — who portrayed Johnson, Vaughn and Jackson, respectively — in addition to costar Kevin Costner, director Ted Melfi and musical superstar Pharrell Williams, who produced the movie. The event also featured remarks from former NASA Administrator Charles Frank Bolden, Jr., as well as the unveiling of a portrait of Katherine Johnson by renowned photographer Annie Leibovitz. That portrait is now part of the Museum’s collection.

With the opening of Museum, trailblazing African American women like Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson are finally receiving the recognition they so richly deserve — inspiring girls and young women everywhere to pursue their dreams. And as a supporter, you can take pride in knowing that you help bring the stories of these African American heroes — and many more — out of the shadows and into the spotlight.

Thank you for helping the National Museum of African American History and Culture elevate the African American experience to its rightful place at the center of our nation’s story!

dd-sustainerlanding-2014-lonnie-bunch.jpg All the best,
DD YE year end 1 signature
Lonnie G. Bunch III
Founding Director

on this day … 3/31 1933 – The U.S. Congress authorized the Civilian Conservation Corps to relieve rampant unemployment.


1492 – King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain issued the Alhambra edict expelling Jews who were unwilling to convert to Christianity.

1776 – Abigail Adams wrote to her husband John that women were “determined to foment a rebellion” if the new Declaration of Independence failed to guarantee their rights.

1779 – Russia and Turkey signed a treaty concerning military action in Crimea.

1831 – Quebec and Montreal were incorporated as cities.

1854 – The U.S. government signed the Treaty of Kanagawa with Japan. The act opened the ports of Shimoda and Hakotade to American trade.

1862 – Skirmishing between Rebels and Union forces took place at Island 10 on the Mississippi River.

1870 – In Perth Amboy, NJ, Thomas Munday Peterson became the first black to vote in the U.S.

1880 – Wabash, IN, became the first town to be completely illuminated with electric light.

1885 – Binney & Smith Company was founded in New York City. The company later became Crayola, LLC.

1889 – In Paris, the Eiffel Tower officially opened.

1900 – The W.E. Roach Company was the first automobile company to put an advertisement in a national magazine. The magazine was the “Saturday Evening Post“.

1900 – In France, the National Assembly passed a law reducing the workday for women and children to 11 hours.

1901 – In Russia, the Czar lashed out at Socialist-Revolutionaries with the arrests of 72 people and the seizing of two printing presses.

1902 – In Tennessee, 22 coal miners were killed by an explosion.

1904 – In India, hundreds of Tibetans were slaughtered by the British.

1905 – Kaiser Wilhelm arrived in Tangier proclaiming to support for an independent state of Morocco.

1906 – The Conference on Moroccan Reforms in Algerciras ended after two months with France and Germany in agreement.

1906 – The Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States was founded to set rules in amateur sports. The organization became the National Collegiate Athletic Association in 1910.

1908 – 250,000 coal miners in Indianapolis, IN, went on strike to await a wage adjustment.

1909 – Serbia accepted Austrian control over Bosnia-Herzegovina.

1917 – The U.S. purchased and took possession of the Virgin Islands from Denmark for $25 million.

1918 – For the first time in the U.S., Daylight Saving Time went into effect.

1921 – Great Britain declared a state of emergency because of the thousands of coal miners on strike.

1923 – In New York City, the first U.S. dance marathon was held. Alma Cummings set a new world record of 27 hours.

1932 – The Ford Motor Co. debuted its V-8 engine.

1933 – The U.S. Congress authorized the Civilian Conservation Corps to relieve rampant unemployment.

1933 – The “Soperton News” in Georgia became the first newspaper to publish using a pine pulp paper.

1939 – Britain and France agreed to support Poland if Germany threatened invasion.

1940 – La Guardia airport in New York officially opened to the public.

1941 – Germany began a counter offensive in North Africa.

1945 – “The Glass Menagerie” by Tennessee Williams opened on Broadway.

1946 – Monarchists won the elections in Greece.

1947 – John L. Lewis called a strike in sympathy for the miners killed in an explosion in Centralia, IL, on March 25, 1947.

1948 – The Soviets in Germany began controlling the Western trains headed toward Berlin.

1949 – Winston Churchill declared that the A-bomb was the only thing that kept the U.S.S.R. from taking over Europe.

1949 – Newfoundland entered the Canadian confederation as its 10th province.

1958 – The U.S. Navy formed the atomic submarine division.

1959 – The Dalai Lama (Lhama Dhondrub, Tenzin Gyatso) began exile by crossing the border into India where he was granted political asylum. Gyatso was the 14th Daila Lama.

1960 – The South African government declared a state of emergency after demonstrations led to the death of more than 50 Africans.

1966 – An estimated 200,000 anti-war demonstrators march in New York City. (New York)

1966 – The Soviet Union launched Luna 10, which became the first spacecraft to enter a lunar orbit.

1967 – U.S. President Lyndon Johnson signed the Consular Treaty, the first bi-lateral pact with the Soviet Union since the Bolshevik Revolution.

1970 – The U.S. forces in Vietnam down a MIG-21, it was the first since September 1968.

1976 – The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that Karen Anne Quinlan could be disconnected from a respirator. Quinlan remained comatose until 1985 when she died.

1980 – U.S. President Carter deregulated the banking industry.

1981 – In Bangkok, Thailand, four of five Indonesian terrorists were killed after hijacking an airplane on March 28.

1985 – ABC-TV aired the 200th episode of “The Love Boat.”

1986 – 167 people died when a Mexicana Airlines Boeing 727 crashed in Los Angeles.

1987 – HBO (Home Box Office) earned its first Oscar for “Down and Out in America”.

1989 – Canada and France signed a fishing rights pact.

1991 – Albania offered a multi-party election for the first time in 50 years. Incumbent President Ramiz Alia won.

1991 – Iraqi forces recaptured the northern city of Kirkuk from Kurdish guerillas.

1993 – Brandon Lee was killed accidentally while filming a movie.

1994 – “Nature” magazine announced that a complete skull of Australppithecus afarensis had been found in Ethiopia. The finding is of humankind’s earliest ancestor.

1998 – U.N. Security Council imposed arms embargo on Yugoslavia.

1998 – Buddy Hackett received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

1998 – For the first time in U.S. history the federal government’s detailed financial statement was released. This occurred under the Clinton administration.

1999 – Three U.S. soldiers were captured by Yugoslav soldiers three miles from the Yugoslav border in Macedonia.

1999 – Fabio was hit in the face by a bird during a promotional ride of a new roller coaster at the Busch Gardens theme park in Williamsburg, VA. Fabio received a one-inch cut across his nose.

2000 – In Uganda, officials set the number of deaths linked to a doomsday religious cult, the Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments, at more than 900. In Kanungu, a March 17 fire at the cult’s church killed more than 530 and authorities subsequently found mass graves at various sites linked to the cult.

2004 – Air America Radio launched five stations around the U.S.

2004 – Google Inc. announced that it would be introducing a free e-mail service called Gmail.

2016 – Apple released the iPhone SE.

Paid Family Leave Regulations ~ Comments needed by April 10


A Better BalanceWe need your help! Comments are due on the proposed New York paid family leave regulations on April 10
 abetterbalance.org
We need your help! Comments are due on the proposed New York paid family leave regulations on April 10
To make this easy, you’ll find a simple template comment below that you can cut and paste (just fill in your information where it is highlighted in yellow). Please submit these comments by e-mail to regulations@wcb.ny.gov.When you submit, please cc us and/or send us a copy of your comments (mwilliamson@abetterbalance.org).

If you have any questions about the law, regulations, or comment process, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us at mwilliamson@abetterbalance.org or 212-430-5982.
—-

Heather M. MacMaster
Deputy General Counsel
Workers’ Compensation Board
328 State Street
Schenectady, NY 12305
Submitted via email to regulations@wcb.ny.gov
Re: Comments on Proposed Paid Family Leave Regulations
Dear Ms. MacMaster:
We are writing to submit comments on the proposed paid family leave regulations. We thank you for the opportunity to comment on these proposed regulations. We were proud to support New York as it enacted its groundbreaking paid family leave law, including best-in-the-nation provisions like twelve weeks of paid leave with full job protection for all covered workers. These regulations fulfill that bold promise to New York’s working families.
Personal Background and Interest Statement: Example: My organization works with low-income women in Syracuse. We have seen how important it is for parents to have paid time off to bond with a new child without risking their jobs.
We are proud to support the inclusion of the following provisions:
  •  Allowing workers to take leave prior to formal placement for adoption ((12 NYCRR § 380-2.2(a)).
  • Authorizing bonding leave for children born or placed prior to January 1, 2018 (12 NYCRR § 380-2.7).
  • An accessible process for filing claims (Subpart 380-5)
  • A workable system for workers to receive benefits payments (12 NYCRR §§ 380-5.6 through 380-5.11).
  • Ensuring employers provide workers with needed information about their rights (12 NYCRR § 380-7.2).

We suggest the following changes:

  • Changing 12 NYCRR § 380-2.2(c) to state: “An employee who is eligible for both family leave and disability benefits, including due to the birth of a child, may choose whether to receive both benefits but may not receive both benefits at the same time.”
  • Removing any statement suggesting that benefits can be partially or wholly denied for failure to comply with technical notice requirements (12 NYCRR § 380-3.3 and 12 NYCRR § 380-3.5).
  • Removing the first sentence (“In accordance with the Family and Medical Leave Act (29 U.S.C. Sections 2601-2654):”) of 12 NYCRR § 380-7.4.
  • Removing the provision authorizing employers to choose (at their discretion) to begin withholding employee payroll deductions on July 1, 2017 (12 NYCRR § 380-2.4(d)).
  • Removing language that would reduce the amount of paid family leave available to part-time workers who take leave on intermittent basis (12 NYCRR § 380-2.5(b)(1)(i)).

Because job protection is a landmark feature of the New York paid family leave law, we strongly suggest the following changes to Subpart 380-8:

  • Removing the requirement that workers file a formal request for reinstatementwithin 120 days as a condition of filing a complaint (12 NYCRR § 380-8.1)
  • Clarifying how workers can enforce their rights under N.Y. Workers’ Compensation Law § 203-a (“Retaliatory action prohibited for family leave”) and N.Y. Workers’ Compensation Law § 203-c (“Health insurance during family leave”).

We also suggest adding:

  • Language to codify protections for immigrant workers in the regulations, as the state has already committed to doing the “FAQs” section of the state website.
Sincerely,
[Your Name]

Separation of Church and State …


United States

John Locke, English political philosopher argued for individual conscience, free from state control

The concept of separating church and state is often credited to the writings of EnglishJohn Locke.[1] philosopher According to his principle of the social contract, Locke argued that the government lacked authority in the realm of individual conscience, as this was something rational people could not cede to the government for it or others to control. For Locke, this created a natural right in the liberty of conscience, which he argued must therefore remain protected from any government authority. These views on religious tolerance and the importance of individual conscience, along with his social contract, became particularly influential in the American colonies and the drafting of the United States Constitution.[21]Thomas Jefferson stated: “Bacon, Locke and Newton..I consider them as the three greatest men that have ever lived, without any exception, and as having laid the foundation of those superstructures which have been raised in the physical and moral sciences”[22][23] Indeed such was Locke’s influence,

The concept was implicit in the flight of Roger Williams from religious oppression in Massachusetts to found what became Rhode Island on the principle of state neutrality in matters of faith.[24][25]

Reflecting a concept often credited in its original form to the English political philosopher John Locke,[1] the phrase separation of church and state is generally traced to the letter written by Thomas Jefferson in 1802 to the Danbury Baptists, in which he referred to the First Amendment to the United States Constitution as creating a “wall of separation” between church and state.[2]United States Supreme Court first in 1878, and then in a series of cases starting in 1947. This led to increased popular and political discussion of the concept. The phrase was quoted by the

The concept has since been adopted in a number of countries, to varying degrees depending on the applicable legal structures and prevalent views toward the proper role of religion in society. A similar principle of laïcité has been applied in France and Turkey, while some socially secularized countries such as Norway have maintained constitutional recognition of an official state religion. The concept parallels various other international social and political ideas, including secularism, disestablishment, religious liberty, and religious pluralism.

source: wiki