The Governor Pence Scandal No One Is Talking About


Mike the Mad Biologist

It really hasn’t been a great week for the state of Indiana, with the worst hit being the signing of ‘right’ to discriminate (against gays) legislation. But what’s lost in all of that is Indiana Gov. Mike Pence has decided to follow the scientific evidence–only after it’s too late (boldface mine):

An outbreak of H.I.V. in southeastern Indiana prompted the governor on Thursday to declare a public health emergency as officials worked to stop the spread of the virus that causes AIDS.

Officials said that 71 cases of H.I.V. identified since mid-December have been traced to intravenous use of a prescription painkiller in Scott County north of Louisville, Ky. Nine more cases are still under investigation, and state health officials predicted that more would appear in coming weeks. The governor authorized a short-term exchange program that would provide drug users with access to sterile needles so that contaminated…

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on this day 5/6 1960 – U.S. President Eisenhower signed the Civil Rights Act of 1960.


1527 – German troops began sacking Rome, bringing about the end of the Renaissance.

1529 – Babur defeated the Afghan Chiefs in the Battle of Ghagra, India.

1576 – The peace treaty of Chastenoy ended the fifth war of religion.

1682 – King Louis XIV moved his court to Versailles, France.

1835 – James Gordon Bennett published the “New York Herald” for the first time.

1840 – The first adhesive postage stamps went on sale in Great Britain.

1851 – The mechanical refrigerator was patented by Dr. John Gorrie.

1851 – Linus Yale patented the clock-type lock.

1861 – Arkansas became the ninth state to secede from the Union.

1877 – Chief Crazy Horse surrendered to U.S. troops in Nebraska.

1882 – The U.S. Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act. The act barred Chinese immigrants from the U.S. for 10 years.

1889 – The Universal Exposition opened in Paris, France, marking the dedication of the Eiffel Tower. Also at the exposition was the first automobile in Paris, the Mercedes-Benz.

1910 – Kind Edward VII of England died. He was succeeded by his second son, George V.

1915 – Babe Ruth hit his first major league home run while playing for the Boston Red Sox.

1937 – The German airship Hindenburg crashed and burned in Lakehurst, NJ. Thirty-six people (of the 97 on board) were killed.

1941 – Joseph Stalin assumed the Soviet premiership.

1941 – Bob Hope gave his first USO show at California’s March Field.

1942 – During World War II, the Japanese seized control of the Philippines. About 15,000 Americans and Filipinos on Corregidor surrendered to the Japanese.

1945 – Axis Sally made her final propaganda broadcast to Allied troops.

1946 – The New York Yankees became the first major league baseball team to travel by plane.

1954 – British runner Roger Banister broke the four minute mile.

1957 – U.S. Senator John Fitzgerald Kennedy was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his book “Profiles in Courage”.

1959 – The Pablo Picasso painting of a Dutch girl was sold for $154,000 in London. It was the highest price paid (at the time) for a painting by a living artist.

1960 – Britain’s Princess Margaret married Anthony Armstrong Jones. They were divorced in 1978.

1960 – U.S. President Eisenhower signed the Civil Rights Act of 1960.

1962 – The first nuclear warhead was fired from the Polaris submarine.

1981 – A jury of international architects and sculptors unanimously selected Maya Ying Lin’s entry for the design of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

1994 – The Channel Tunnel officially opened. The tunnel under the English Channel links England and France.

1994 – Former Arkansas state worker Paula Jones filed suit against U.S. President Clinton. The case alleged that he had sexually harassed her in 1991.

1997 – Army Staff Sgt. Delmar G. Simpson was sentenced to 25 years in prison for raping six trainees at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland.

1997 – Four health-care companies agreed to a settlement of $600 million to hemophiliacs who had contracted AIDS from tainted blood between 1978-1985.

1999 – Britain’s Labour Party won the largest number of seats in the first elections for Scotland’s new Parliament and Wales’ new Assembly.

1999 – A parole board in New York voted to release Amy Fisher. She had been in jail for 7 years for shooting her lover’s wife, Mary Jo Buttafuoco, in the face.

2001 – Chandra Levy’s parents reported her missing to police in Washington, DC. Levy’s body was found on May 22, 2002 in Rock Creek Park.

2002 – “Spider-Man” became the first movie to make more than $100 million in its first weekend.