A Seat at the Table: NMAAHC:On June 11, 2017


A SPECIAL EVENT ON JUNE 11TH: A SEAT AT THE TABLE
On Sunday, June 11, 2017, at 7 PM, the National Museum of African American History and Culture will host A Seat at the Table with LGBTQ Friends in Faith. This event provides a platform for audiences to consider challenging questions about race, identity, faith, and sexual orientation. We will review clips from the 2013 documentary film The New Black that describes how the African American community comes to terms with gay marriage and civil rights. Join an insightful dialogue with filmmaker Yoruba Richen and Bishop Yvette Flunder, with moderator Earl Fowlkes, and a special performance by Lee Mokobe.

 

About “A Seat at the Table”

“A Seat at the Table” is a participatory program that promotes conversations about social justice and explores issues of contemporary importance linked to systemic racism, and social, political, and economic inequity. This program augments the National Museum of African American History and Culture’s mission to explore the American experience through the African American lens, and what it means to be an American. “A Seat at the Table” sparks critical thinking and creative conversations about fairness and an exchange of ideas for making our world more equitable.

 

Tickets will go on sale Friday, May 26, 2017 at 10 AM Eastern time.

Tickets are $35.00 per person. Active Charter Members will receive a discounted ticket price of $25.00 per person.

To become a Charter Member, and receive a discount to this and future events, please click here.

To renew your membership, and receive a discount to this and future events, please click here.

If you wish to request your membership number or confirm your Charter Member status, please call us at 1-800-209-9178.

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on this day 5/29 2001 – In New York, four followers of Osama bin Laden were convicted of a global conspiracy to murder Americans. The crimes included the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa that killed 224 people.


1453 – Constantinople fell to Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II, ending the Byzantine Empire.

1660 – Charles II was restored to the English throne after the Puritan Commonwealth.

1721 – South Carolina was formally incorporated as a royal colony.

1765 – Patrick Henry denounced the Stamp Act before Virginia‘s House of Burgesses.

1790 – Rhode Island became the last of the original thirteen colonies to ratify the U.S. Constitution.

1827 – The first nautical school opened in Nantucket, MA, under the name Admiral Sir Isaac Coffin’s Lancasterian School.

1848 – WIsconsin became the 30th state to join the United States.

1849 – A patent for lifting vessels was granted to Abraham Lincoln.

1910 – An airplane raced a train from Albany, NY, to New York City. The airplane pilot Glenn Curtiss won the $10,000 prize.

1912 – Fifteen women were dismissed from their jobs at the Curtis Publishing Company in Philadelphia, PA, for dancing the Turkey Trot while on the job.

1916 – The official flag of the president of the United States was adopted.

1916 – U.S. forces invaded Dominican Republic and remained until 1924.

1922 – Ecuador became independent.

1922 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that organized baseball was a sport, not subject to antitrust laws.

1932 – World War I veterans began arriving in Washington, DC. to demand cash bonuses they were not scheduled to receive for another 13 years.

1951 – C.F. Blair became the first man to fly over the North Pole in single engine plane.

1953 – Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay became first men to reach the top of Mount Everest.

1962 – Buck (John) O’Neil became the first black coach in major league baseball when he accepted the job with the Chicago Cubs.

1965 – Ralph Boston set a world record in the broad jump at 27-feet, 4-3/4 inches, at a meet held in Modesto, CA.

1973 – Tom Bradley was elected the first black mayor of Los Angeles.

1974 – U.S. President Nixon agreed to turn over 1,200 pages of edited Watergate transcripts.

1978 – In the U.S., postage stamps were raised from 13 cents to 15 cents.

1981 – The U.S. performed a nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site.

1985 – Thirty-nine people were killed and 400 were injured in a riot at a European Cup soccer match in Brussels, Belgium.

1986 – Colonel Oliver North told National Security Advisor William McFarlane that profits from weapons sold to Iran were being diverted to the Contras.

1988 – U.S. President Reagan began his first visit to the Soviet Union in Moscow.

1988 – NBC aired “To Heal A Nation,” the story of Jan Scruggs’ effort to build the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

1990 – Boris Yeltsin was elected president of the Russian republic by the Russian parliament.

1997 – The ruling party in Indonesia, Golkar, won the Parliament election by a record margin. There was a boycott movement and rioting that killed 200 people.

1999 – Space shuttle Discovery completed the first docking with the International Space Station.

2000 – Fiji’s military took control of the nation and declared martial law following a coup attempt by indigenous Fijians in mid-May.

2001 – In New York, four followers of Osama bin Laden were convicted of a global conspiracy to murder Americans. The crimes included the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa that killed 224 people.

2001 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that disabled golfer Casey Martin could use a cart to ride in tournaments.

2015 – The Obama adminstration removed Cuba from the U.S. terrorism blacklist. The two countries had severed diplomatic relations in January of 1961.

How to Have a Food Safe Memorial Day


Avoid the “Danger Zone” this Summer

Summer picnic foodsfoodsafety.gov

With the summer right around the corner, families across the country will take out their grills and start spending more time in the great outdoors.  We are urging everyone to remember the four simple steps to food safety – Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill – and to steer clear of the ‘Danger Zone’ when grilling this Memorial Day weekend.

It is important to remember that bacteria grow faster in the same warm temperatures, so extra care should be taken to make sure perishable food doesn’t spend too long in the Danger Zone. That is temperatures between 40 and 140 ˚F when perishable food spoils rapidly. Foods that should be served hot or cold should not spend more than one hour in the Danger Zone when temperatures are above 90 ˚F, and two hours when temperatures are below 90 ˚F.

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