July court trial could force Texas GOP to draw new congressional map for 2018


Texas: A three-judge federal district court panel overseeing two racial gerrymandering challenges to the congressional and state House maps that Texas Republicans drew in 2011 has ordered that an expedited trial take place for five days starting on July 10 over whether the current maps are invalid. Absurdly, this litigation has been ongoing ever since 2011, but if the plaintiffs prevail, it would finally pave the way for Republican legislators to have to draw new congressional and state House districts for the 2018 elections that would result in black and Latino voters being able to elect their preferred candidates in additional districts.

This same court panel struck down the GOP’s congressional gerrymander in March and did the same for the state House map in April, both over intentional racially discrimination. However, they did not impose any remedy because neither map was still in effect. Federal courts had blocked the GOP’s original 2011 maps from ever being used and had imposed temporary lines for the 2012 elections. Republican legislators largely made those changes permanent in 2013, and plaintiffs will be arguing to invalidate those 2013 maps this summer, since those lines still largely resemble the original 2011 districts.

Given the judges’ recent ruling against the 2011 maps and the fact that some of the challenged 2013 districts are literally the exact same as those the court deemed illegal, there is a strong chance that the plaintiffs will prevail after this latest trial. Republican legislators would almost certainly appeal any such ruling directly to the Supreme Court, but swing Justice Anthony Kennedy’s recent pattern of siding with the court’s liberals on racial gerrymandering cases is an encouraging sign for opponents of Republican abuses of the practice.

Redistricting

Alabama: Republican legislators recently used their lopsided majorities to advance a proposal through the state Senate and through a state House committee that would redraw most of the state’s legislative districts for both chambers following an early 2017 federal court ruling that invalidated a dozen districts over racial gerrymandering. Democratic and black legislators steadfastly objected to these proposed districts for failing to eliminate the racial harms of the existing maps. Further litigation is likely, and the court will ultimately have to approve any new districts for the 2018 elections.

Alabama Republicans gained control over redistricting in 2010 for the first time since Reconstruction. Claiming the Voting Rights Act required it, the GOP drew districts in 2012 that used a mechanical black population proportion threshold for certain heavily black districts that already had a history of electing the preferred candidates of black voters, regardless of whether that threshold was necessary. Doing so effectively packed black voters into fewer districts so that they could not elect their chosen candidates in neighboring seats, consequently hurting Democrats.

A 2015 Supreme Court ruling found that this mechanical threshold violated the Constitution, sending the case back to the lower court to redecide, which they did this year in a partial victory for the plaintiffs. However, since Republicans dominate Alabama’s state government, they get first crack at drawing maps that pass constitutional scrutiny. With white Republican legislators having no desire to see the election of additional black Democrats, litigation over the GOP’s new remedy maps will likely wind up back in court, with a probable appeal to the Supreme Court once again.

Ohio: Republican state Attorney General Mike DeWine blocked approval of a proposed redistricting reform initiative from appearing on the 2017 ballot, although proponents would have faced the daunting task of gathering over 300,000 valid signatures by July 5 even if he had approved it. The nonpartisan redistricting-reform group Common Cause is hoping to change the way Ohio redraws its congressional districts before the next round of redistricting in 2021. Their failed 2017 proposal would have added congressional redistricting to the purview of Ohio’s bipartisan legislative redistricting commission, which Republican legislators oppose.

That commission itself was reformed in a 2015 ballot referendum that had broad support from legislators within both parties. It consists of elected officials from both major political parties and requires support from at least one minority-party member for a map to last for 10 full years, although the majority party can unilaterally pass a map for four years. This commission is undoubtedly preferable to the status quo of the legislature still getting to draw an unencumbered GOP gerrymander for Congress in 2021, but Daily Kos Elections has previously detailed its fundamental flaws compared to truly independent commissions like the one in California and elsewhere.

Voter ID

Iowa: As expected, GOP Gov. Terry Branstad finally signed a broad voting restriction bill that Iowa Republicans eyed almost immediately after they gained unified control over state government in 2016 for the first time in nearly two decades. Among other changes, the new law imposes a strict voter ID requirement, although some IDs without a photo are acceptable. It also abolishes the straight-ticket voting option and cuts early voting down from 40 days to 29, although that latter number is still far more generous than what’s offered in many states.

Republicans contend that the law will provide an ID to registered voters who lack one, but it won’t provide IDs to the far larger number of unregistered yet eligible voters without one. Furthermore, Republicans rejected allowing the use of student IDs from state schools, a move that is transparently designed to target that Democratic-leaning demographic. Meanwhile, ending straight-ticket voting could lead to longer lines, particularly in predominantly black or Latino neighborhoods, and encourage voters to skip downballot races.

Voting Access and Registration

Alaska: The coalition of Democrats, independents, and a few dissident Republicans that controls the Alaska state House passed a bill strictly along caucus lines that would allow for same-day voter registration, with all members of the GOP caucus minority in opposition. While independent Gov. Bill Walker, who was elected with the support of Democrats, would likely sign it, the bill faces a dicey fate in the state Senate, where the Republican caucus remains decisively in the majority.

Georgia: Voting rights advocates scored a victory on Thursday when a federal judge granted an injunction that temporarily reopens the voter registration period ahead of the critical 6th Congressional District special election. Federal law bans states from setting a registration deadline more than 30 days in advance of an election, but Georgia Republicans had tried to prevent anyone who hadn’t registered ahead of the April 18 all-party primary from participating in the June 20 general election, essentially imposing a 90-day cutoff. Consequently, new voters have through May 21to register.

Although the partisan impact of this ruling might be modest, it could nonetheless prove key for Democrat Jon Ossoff in what has become an incredibly closely contested race, since bringing new voters into the electorate is an indispensable component of how to successfully channel the Trump-inspired surge of Democratic enthusiasm into the ballot box. Indeed, Georgia has seen a surge of new voter registration applications statewide after recently moving to comply with the federal “Motor Voter” law, with 559,000 new applications in 2017 compared to a mere 95,000 during this same period in 2015.

Hawaii: For the third straight year in a row, both chambers of Hawaii’s almost monolithically Democratic legislature have passed a bill to switch elections to a vote-by-mail system only to see it die in conference committee after each chamber was unable to reconcile different versions. After Hawaii ranked last in voter turnout in both 2012, proponents had pushed this change to have the state simply mail every registered voter a ballot, making the process easier. Colorado, Oregon, and Washington already run their elections this way and consistently rank well above average in turnout, but unfortunately Hawaii will not join them for now.

Illinois: On Friday, the Illinois state Senate unanimously passed an automatic voter registration bill, coming after the Democratic-run legislature passed a different proposal in 2016, but Democrats lacked the votes to override Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner’s veto. However, it’s unclear if this new compromise version will be nearly as effective as 2016’s proposal in terms of expanding the voter rolls. It would still automatically register eligible voters who interact with certain state agencies unless they opt out, but it would ask voters up front to confirm their eligibility rather than having election administrators do so, which could deter eligible registrants.

The Daily Kos Elections Voting Rights Roundup is written by Stephen Wolf and edited by David Nir.

To advertise in the Voting Rights Roundup, please contact advertise@dailykos.com.

Advertisements

WA state 2yr budget highlights … $43.7 bil budget averts govt shutdown


New tax revenue

  • $1.6 billion from an increase in the state property tax earmarked for education.

• $431.8 million from expansion of online sales-tax collections.

• $15.6 million from eliminating tax breaks on bottled water and extracted fuels.

New spending

• $1.8 billion added to public schools.

• $618 million for state-worker pay raises.

• $102 million to improve Washington’s troubled mental-health system.

• $75 million added to higher education.

• $25 million to expand early-childhood education.

• $6.3 million to create a new state Department of Children, Youth and Families.

• $4.6 million to fund a clean-air program that caps carbon emissions from a handful of businesses.

• $3.2 million to the Department of Corrections to hire records staffers and beef up its IT systems in the wake of a long-running mistaken release of prisoners.

resource: seattletimes.com

This Could Be Gerrymandering – reminder


By  a repost from 4/2015

The Supreme Court Gives a Second Chance to Opponents of North Carolina’s Redistricting Plan

The Supreme Court gave good news to opponents of North Carolina’s gerrymandered redistricting map — and supporters of representative government! — yesterday. The high court ordered that North Carolina take another look at a challenge to the state’s election map. In December, the North Carolina Supreme Court upheld a redistricting map drawn by the Republican legislature that packs African-American voters into a few districts, diluting the overall power of their vote. The Supreme Court did not issue a formal decision on the case, but the justices ordered the state supreme court to reexamine the case, which is an important first step in ensuring that the state’s election maps are fairly considered.

African American voters in North Carolina saw a drastic change in representation after the 2010 census, when the map in question was drawn. Before 2011, North Carolina had ten majority black state House districts. After, the number more than doubled to 23. Concentrating black voters into a handful of districts dilutes the group’s voting strength by increasing the proportion of white voters in other districts. For example, in 2012, while more than half of North Carolina voters voted for Democratic representation in the U.S. House of Representatives, Republicans filled about 70 percent of the seats.

Much controversy surrounds the drawing of North Carolina’s redistricting maps. Through a project called the Redistricting Majority Project, the Republican State Leadership Committee (RSLC), worked with many states, including North Carolina, to draw election maps that would rig the game in their favor.

The RSLC was looking to influence the outcome of these gerrymandered maps in other ways as well. The group was by far the largest contributor in the last two North Carolina Supreme Court races, which both took place after this court case was filed and while the appeal was pending, calling into question the partiality of the court’s decision. The Center for American Progress looks deeper into the influence of the RSLC and other conservative groups on judicial races and looks at some of the return on investments these groups are getting.
Yesterday’s decision represents some momentum for advocates of good government. It built off of a similar ruling on Alabama’s election map that the court handed down in March. The Alabama decision asked a lower court to consider whether concentrating minority voters into a handful of districts could violate the Voting Rights Act by limiting the number of districts in which minorities could influence elections. These two orders from the Supreme Court are a good sign that the highest court is taking a harder look at racial gerrymandering.

BOTTOM LINE: The Supreme Court’s order to revive the challenge to North Carolina’s unfair election map is a step in the right direction. Fixing the state’s election map is just one of many steps that will need to be taken to ensure that conservatives cannot continue stacking the deck in their favor by suppressing the voice of others.

Chlorpyrifos,a toxic pesticide! do you know what they can do to Your children?


Dear Friend,

Tell Retailers: Say NO to Chlorpyrifos | Sign the PetitionWe were outraged when Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt announced his decision to reverse the agency’s scheduled ban of Dow’s chlorpyrifos, a toxic pesticide that harms kids’ brains. But now The Associated Press has revealed that Scott Pruitt met privately with Dow’s CEO just days before making that decision – this came just a few months after the CEO gave President Trump $1 million to help pay for his inauguration!

Enough is enough, Friend! It’s clear that under Scott Pruitt the EPA won’t work to protect consumers, so we need to take matters into our hands. More than 80,000 activists have already joined our call demanding major retailers say NO to chlorpyrifos, but it’s clear we’re going to need every one of us.

Help us reach 100,000 signatures to stop chlorpyrifos! Click here to add your name and call on major grocery retailers like Safeway, Kroger and Publix to say NO to the toxic pesticide chlorpyrifos!

Research has linked the organophosphate pesticide to nervous system damage, behavioral problems, autism, ADHD and lower IQs in young children whose mothers were exposed during pregnancy. In adults, low-level exposure to chlorpyrifos can cause nausea, headaches and dizziness. Farmworkers and others who experience severe exposures have suffered vomiting, muscle cramps, diarrhea, blurred vision, loss of consciousness and even paralysis.

Chlorpyrifos is licensed for use on nearly 50 food crops, including fruits, vegetables and nuts. In its annual tests for pesticide residues on conventionally grown fruits and vegetables, the U.S. Department of Agriculture found especially high concentrations on a few specific crops, most of which were imported.

Can we count on you to stand with us against the pesticide industry? Click here to take action and tell major grocery retailers to stop selling fruits and vegetables treated with chlorpyrifos.

While Pruitt and the Trump administration’s decision ignored overwhelming evidence that small amounts of chlorpyrifos can damage parts of the brain that control language, memory, behavior and emotion, it’s not too late for retailers to step up and do the right thing – but they need to hear from every one of us.

Thanks for standing with us, Friend. We’ve moved markets before, and with your help, we’ll do it again.

– EWG Action Alert

A look at 2017 ~~~ Sage, Working Washington


We are Working Washington

This weekend marks the halfway point through the year and even though we’ve still got a good six months ahead of us, I’m proud to say Working Washington has gotten enough done that we need to break out the bullet points.

So far in 2017, with your support:

  • We kicked off the New Year by celebrating minimum wage increases in Seattle and across the state — and since then we’ve seen record-low unemployment, and job growth in all 39 counties.
  • We helped stop anti-minimum wage fast food CEO Andy Puzder from getting appointed to be the U.S. Secretary of Labor.
  • We organized, spoke out, and took action to make paid family leave one of the key issues in state politics this year, setting the stage for a potential breakthrough.
  • We exposed the misleading practice of minimum wage surcharges.
  • We updated our groundbreaking What’s my Wage app to help workers navigate the various minimum wage rates across the state.
  • We re-launched the BossFeed Briefing, our weekly roundup of key news on workers rights & inequality.
  • We helped lead a powerful protest in Yakima in defense of affordable healthcare.
  • We launched a project to train workers to address health & safety issues on the job.
  • We co-hosted a forum for Seattle mayoral candidates to make sure worker voices are part of the public debate.
  • We grew our movement by more than 15,000 people.
  • And just a couple days from now on July 1st, secure scheduling takes effect for thousands of Seattle food, coffee, and retail workers.

All that — and we’re only halfway through the year!

Click here to contribute $25 or whatever you can afford so we can build on that success and continue to break ground in the second half of the year. 

CONTRIBUTE

I feel good about what we’ve accomplished so far together. It’s almost enough that we could maybe get away with just sitting tight and phoning it in for the rest of the year.

But that’s not how Working Washington rolls. In the months ahead we are going to keep on getting it done and we’re going to make that list of bullet points grow even longer.

Here’s a sneak peek: We want to build a voice for workers in state politics with our first-ever statewide candidate endorsements. We want to roll out innovative new approaches to organizing workers in key industries. We want to build new partnerships across the state to address issues like housing, transportation, and immigration that affect workers’ lives when they’re not on the clock. And so much more.…

And yeah, that’s a lot to get done, but we’re already halfway there — and with your support we’ll make it. (I swear.)

You read our emails. (The good ones at least. 🙂 ) You take action when it’s needed. You support our work in all kinds of ways, and you’ve helped make all this happen. Now can you take the next step to build our movement by making a contribution today?

If you’ve saved your payment information with ActBlue Express, your donation will go through immediately:

Thanks for everything you do,
Sage, Working Washington

 

P.S. Woah, woah, living on a prayer.