Category Archives: ~ On This Day …

BIO.com On This Day

on this day 7/24 1969 -Apollo 11 astronauts splashed down safely in the Pacific Ocean. &1974 – SCOTUS unanimously ruled Nixon had to turn over subpoenaed WH tape recordings to the Watergate special prosecutor. 


1847 – Mormon leader Brigham Young and his followers arrived in the valley of the Great Salt Lake in present-day Utah.

1847 – Richard M. Hoe patented the rotary-type printing press.

1849 – Georgetown University in Washington, DC, presented its first Doctor of Music Degree. It was given to Professor Henry Dielman.

1866 – Tennessee became the first state to be readmitted to the Union after the U.S. Civil War.

1923 – The Treaty of Lausanne, which settled the boundaries of modern Turkey, was concluded in Switzerland.

1929 – U.S. President Hoover proclaimed the Kellogg-Briand Pact, which renounced war as an instrument of foreign policy.

1948 – Soviet occupation forces in Germany blockaded West Berlin. The U.S.-British airlift began the following day.

1956 – Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis ended their team. They ended the partnership a decade after it began on July 25, 1946.

1969 – The Apollo 11 astronauts splashed down safely in the Pacific Ocean.

1974 – The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled that President Nixon had to turn over subpoenaed White House tape recordings to the Watergate special prosecutor. 

Voter Registration: In person at county election depts ~Today July 24


The deadline to register on-line or by mail has passed, but you may register in person at your county elections department through July 24, 2017.

Military and overseas citizens are exempt from registration deadlines and should contact their county elections department for assistance. 

New registrations submitted online will take effect after the current election. Do you want to register for the next election? You will need one of the following:

  • a current Washington State driver license
  • a current Washington State ID card

If you do not have either of these, you may still register by mail or in person.

registration deadlines

If you miss any of these deadlines, contact your county elections department.

election date online & mail-in deadline in-person deadline
August 1, 2017 July 3, 2017 July 24, 2017
November 7, 2017 October 9, 2017 October 30, 2017

have questions?

1-800-448-4881
elections@sos.wa.gov

On This Day ~~~ Nelson Mandela declares victory for the African National Congress


NelsonMandela

Quick Facts

Nelson Mandela was born on July 18, 1918, in Transkei, South Africa. Becoming actively involved in the anti-apartheid movement in his 20s, Mandela joined the African National Congress in 1942. For 20 years, he directed a campaign of peaceful, non-violent defiance against the South African government and its racist policies. In 1993,

Quotes

“I can rest only for a moment, for with freedom come responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not yet ended.”

– Nelson Mandela

“For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.”

– Nelson Mandela

“If you want to make peace with your enemy, you have to work with your enemy. Then he becomes your partner.”

– Nelson Mandela

“Man’s goodness is a flame that can be hidden but never extinguished.”

– Nelson Mandela

“I was made, by the law, a criminal, not because of what I had done, but because of what I stood for, because of what I thought, because of my conscience.”

– Nelson Mandela

Mandela and South African President F.W. de Klerk were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to dismantle the country’s apartheid system. In 1994, Mandela was inaugurated as South Africa’s first black president. In 2009, Mandela’s birthday (July 18) was declared Mandela Day to promote global peace and celebrate the South African leader’s legacy.

Early Life

Nelson Mandela was born Rolihlahla Mandela on July 18, 1918, in the tiny village of Mvezo, on the banks of the Mbashe River in Transkei, South Africa. “Rolihlahla” in the Xhosa language literally means “pulling the branch of a tree,” but more commonly translates as “troublemaker.”

For the complete article … Go To :   www.biography.com/people

on this day 7/17 1945 – U.S. President Truman, Soviet leader Josef Stalin and British Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill began meeting at Potsdam in the final Allied summit of World War II. During the meeting Stalin made the comment that “Hitler had escaped.” 


1212 – The Moslems were crushed in the Spanish crusade.

1453 – France defeated England at Castillon, France, which ended the 100 Years’ War.

1785 – France limited the importation of goods from Britain.

1815 – Napoleon Bonaparte surrendered to the British at Rochefort, France.

1821 – Spain ceded Florida to the U.S.

1862 – National cemeteries were authorized by the U.S. government.

1866 – Authorization was given to build a tunnel beneath the Chicago River. The three-year project cost $512,709.

1867 – Harvard School of Dental Medicine was established in Boston, MA. It was the first dental school in the U.S.

1898 – U.S. troops under General William R. Shafter took Santiago de Cuba during the Spanish-American War.

1917 – The British royal family adopted the Windsor name.

1920 – Sinclair Lewis finished his novel “Main Street.”

1941 – The longest hitting streak in baseball history ended when the Cleveland Indians pitchers held New York Yankee Joe DiMaggio hitless for the first time in 57 games.

1941 – Brigadier General Soervell directed Architect G. Edwin Bergstrom to have basic plans and architectural perspectives for an office building that could house 40,000 War Department employees on his desk by the following Monday morning. The building became known as the Pentagon.

1945 – U.S. President Truman, Soviet leader Josef Stalin and British Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill began meeting at Potsdam in the final Allied summit of World War II. During the meeting Stalin made the comment that “Hitler had escaped.” 

1946 – Chinese communists opened a drive against the Nationalist army on the Yangtze River.

1950 – The television show “The Colgate Comedy Hour” debuted featuring Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis.

1954 – The Brooklyn Dodgers made history as the first team with a majority of black players.

1955 – Disneyland opened in Anaheim, CA.

1960 – Francis Gary Powers pled guilty to spying charges in a Moscow court after his U-2 spy plane was shot down over the Soviet Union.

1966 – Ho Chi Minh ordered a partial mobilization of North Vietnam forces to defend against American air strikes.

1975 – An Apollo spaceship docked with a Soyuz spacecraft in orbit. It was the first link up between the U.S. and Soviet Union.

1979 – Nicaraguan President Anastasio Somoza resigned and fled to Miami in exile. (Florida)

1986 – The largest bankruptcy filing in U.S. history took place when LTV Corporation asked for court protection from more than 20,000 creditors. LTV Corp. had debts in excess of $4 billion.

1987 – Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North and rear Admiral John Poindexter begin testifying to Congress at the “Iran-Contra” hearings.

1995 – The Nasdaq composite stock index rose above 1,000 for the first time.

1997 – After 117 years, the Woolworth Corp. closed its last 400 stores.

1998 – Biologists reported that they had deciphered the genome (genetic map) of the syphilis bacterium.

2008 – In China, construction of the Shanghai World Financial Center was completed.

14th Amendment ~ ratified~ on this day


 

TEXT OF 14th AMENDMENT

AMENDMENT XIV

SECTION 1.

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside. No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

SECTION 2.

Representatives shall be apportioned among the several states according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each state, excluding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the executive and judicial officers of a state, or the members of the legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such state,being twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion, or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such state.

SECTION 3.

No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, or elector of President and Vice President, or hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any state, who, having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a member of any state legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any state, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove such disability.

SECTION 4.

The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any state shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obligations and claims shall be held illegal and void.

SECTION 5.

The Congress shall have power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article.

 

OVERVIEW

The 14th amendment is a very important amendment that defines what it means to be a US citizen and protects certain rights of the people.  There are three important “clauses” in the 14th amendment, each of which are still important today.  A clause is a sentence in any part of our constitution.

Citizenship Clause – the citizenship clause gives individual born in the United States, but especially at that time, African Americans the right to citizenship.  Before the 14th amendment, African Americans could not become citizens and this limited the rights of those that were able to escape slavery and become free.  This clause allows all people born in the United States to be US citizens.  Although this right was established by the Civil Rights of 1866, this amendment made the law permanent as many feared that the law could be overturned and take away the citizenship of African Americans.  Later on, the Supreme Court protected this right for the children of immigrants and the right of Native Americans to become citizens also was protected later on.

Once you have American citizenship, it cannot be taken from you by Congress or other authorities, unless you lie to government during the process to get US citizenship.  Otherwise, everyone that becomes an American citizen stays an American citizen, unless they give it up themselves.

Due Process Clause – the due process clause protects the 1st amendment rights of the people and prevents those rights from being taken away by any government without “due process.”  Due process is a trial by jury for all people accused of wrongdoing.  Although you may think the 1st amendment already protects these rights, the 14th amendment specially enforces the Bill of Rights on the states, to make sure that they can never limit the rights of Americans without fairness.  There were also a number of rights that are protected for those that are accused of a crime but have not been proven to do anything wrong yet.

Equal Protection Clause – This part of the fourteenth amendment states that there may be no discrimination against them by the law.  The federal government enforces this protection on the states, ensuring that they do not.  Remember that the Bill of Rights protects some rights for Americans.  The equal protection clause extended this protection to the state governments.  This clause of the 14th amendment would later be used to end discrimination and segregation in the South.

The 14th amendment was important in bring the Confederacy back into the United States after the Civil War.  The US took responsibility for the pensions for soldier that had fought in the war and refused to take on the Confederate debts, while also preventing former Confederate leaders from holding elected office or civil positions.  Section 3 of the amendment allowed some of these leaders to regain their posts if 2/3 of the state legislatures voted to allow it.  The 14th amendment also ensured that debts due to the emancipation of slaves were “null and void” (not allowed).

 

source: kids.law.com

 

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14th) No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

This is violation of the 9th through the 1st and a blatant violation of the 14th. (The 5th makes the 14th effective through incorporation for those unaware of case law).

source: internet