Tag Archives: Ethnicity

Skin Product Review … The global pursuit of whiter skin – so many questions


My 5/28 repost from awhile back

WhiteningCream

I included a 5/3/2016 from dailykos above because this horrible practice is finally getting more airtime .. however slow this is i definitely welcome it !

picture is from the internet

Product Review … questions

I love products, mostly lotions, lip balm, body wash and hair regimen products. I admit that there was a time when my skin turned on me and eczema ruled then allergies then some other stuff so, I spent some time under the lights and used makeup to even out my skin. I am sure you all know our skin changes due to the environment as well as our hormones so when I read about women of colour choosing to change their skin colour was disturbing.

Whitening the skin is not new … and while I am definitely no expert, as a consumer of beauty products quite frankly I want to know more and pass that information along as well.

However, this is a practice that most definitely needs to end as soon as possible.  I do not get whitening your skin and since when did lighten & brighten mean gaining youthful skin?

I get emails from virtual stores and was interested in Dr. Brandt until I saw the descriptions of a product called,” light years away”! If you read Dr. Brandt’s description of light years it says whitening; so, because it bothered me , I emailed gilt to find out some information … below is the list and my request:

Light years away® whitening cream cleanser, Size: 15 g

Light years away® whitening essence, Size: 20 ml

Light years away® whitening renewal solution, Size: 5 ml

Light years away® brightening eye cream, Size: 15 g

Light years away® whitening cream, Size: 5 g

I have no idea if this product is labeled correctly but knowing how women are whitening their skin these days – here as well as in other countries … and in my opinion, it is an awful practice!

I think Gilt should avoid promoting it…

I get and understand controlling hyper-pigmentation as well as getting rid of dead cells but the product says whitening cream etc.

My question is, has anyone from Gilt tried it and is it a skin whitener ?

Let me know what you think, have you used it and can vouch for it being something other than a skin whitener?

  • Nativegrl77
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Do you know about Indigenous rights? – ran


First posted seven years ago

We are not myths of the past, ruins in the jungle, or zoos. We are people and we want to be respected, not to be victims of intolerance and racism.” —Rigoberta Menchu, Guatemala Nobel Peace Prize Winner, 1992

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People has now been endorsed by 161 countries around the world. It is time for all countries to walk this talk. Here are some of the ways you can join RAN in doing just that.
Table of Contents
**Stand for Justice
**Reclaim Ancestral Lands
**Honor Sacred Sites
**Respect Traditional Territories
**Recognize Free, Prior & Informed Consent
**Protect-An-Acre
**RAN Recommends

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Stand For Justice

Chevron’s massive oil disaster in the Ecuadorean Amazon has affected the health, culture and communities of five Indigenous nationalities: the Cofan, Siona, Secoya, Kichwa, and Huaorani. Chevron has now been found guilty by a court of law but, unsurprisingly, is refusing to pay. Stand with the Indigenous peoples of the Amazon. Stand up to Chevron. Join us

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Reclaim Ancestral Lands

Right now the Indigenous people of Long Teran Kanan in Malaysian Borneo are standing up to the palm oil industry and its unchecked expansion into their rainforest home. After more than a decade of struggle, the Long Teran Kanan community peacefully reclaimed part of their ancestral lands from the palm oil giant IOI Group, one of Cargill’s key suppliers.

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Honor Sacred Sites

Rainforest Action Network‘s headquarters in San Francisco, CA is located on the traditional land of the Ohlone people. Segorea Te a.k.a. Glen Cove is a shellmound, a sacred burial site of the Ohlone people, and it is currently being threatened by proposed development. The recreation department of Vallejo, CA wants to pave trails and parking lots over this sacred site. Tell City of Vallejo officials to respect sacred sites now.

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Respect Traditional Territories

While Disney’s image is built on fairy tales, much of Disney’s manufacturing is built on nightmares. Lab results have shown that Disney, the leading publisher of children’s books worldwide, uses paper created from the destruction of Indonesia’s rainforests. The paper industry’s destruction of rainforests causes Indigenous communities to be pushed off their land, and plant and animal species to be driven further towards extinction. This month RAN activists gave Disney execs a huge wake-up call. So can you.

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Recognize Free, Prior & Informed Consent

To many the World Bank is known as a human rights bulldozer blindly implementing policies around the world that erode the rights, culture, ecosystems and economies of rural and Indigenous peoples. That’s why it may surprise some that the IFC, the private lending arm of the World Bank, recently announced revisions to its policy for projects proposed on Indigenous lands—the IFC now recognizes the principle of Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC). Will the World Bank walk its talk? Will other banks follow suit? The world is watching.

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Protect-An-Acre

Since 1993, RAN’s Protect-An-Acre (PAA) program has distributed more than one million dollars in grants to over 150 Indigenous-led organizations, frontline communities, and allies around the world working to regain control of and sustainably manage their traditional territories. PAA is one of the most direct and effective ways you can stand in solidarity with Indigenous communities and contribute to the protection of our world’s forests.

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RAN

Statewide ban on disposable plastic bags is signed into law by Brown ~ 2018 reminder


Feminism …


by The Thinker-Writer January 31, 2010
 The belief that women are and should be treated as potential intellectual equals and social equals to men. These people can be either male or female human beings, although the ideology is commonly (and perhaps falsely) associated mainly with women.The basic idea of Feminism revolves around the principle that just because human bodies are designed to perform certain procreative functions, biological elements need not dictate intellectual and social functions, capabilities, and rights.Feminism also, by its nature, embraces the belief that all people are entitled to freedom and liberty within reason–including equal civil rights–and that discrimination should not be made based on gender, sexual orientation, skin color, ethnicity, religion, culture, or lifestyle. Feminists–and all persons interested in civil equality and intellectuality–are dedicated to fighting the ignorance that says people are controlled by and limited to their biology.
Feminism is the belief that all people are entitled to the same civil rights and liberties and can be intellectual equals regardless of gender. However, you should still hold the door for a feminist; this is known as respect or politeness and need have nothing whatever to do with gender discrimination.
by The Thinker-Writer January 31, 2010
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So, why did I go to urban dictionary for the definition of Feminism?

beaseedforchangestickersGREENI got my Cosmo in the mail and while the fashions are fun some gaudy others worthy of a second look or two most are out of my price and age range, but when I see hair and beauty products well now that is a whole different response entirely. As I was thumbing through one of many magazines, which is another bad habit, an article about feminism popped up and yes folks are questioning Beyoncé among others with headlines such as … “Can you be Sexy and a Feminist” or as Cosmo asks, “Can you be a Sexy Feminist? It was a quick read and in all honesty I don’t spend a whole lot of my time dissecting labels, but I will say that being a feminist used to be defined as a woman who didn’t appreciate men some said they despised them.  Women were advised to always question the gender roles of men & women, demand equal access to education, hard core feminist suggested being a companion, forget about being happily married least we acquiesce simply because we are women. I don’t subscribe to hating on men, I like men on several levels, that includes my dad, my kids father, my son and a couple of boss’ who happened to be male.

As a side note on a political level, currently Republican men are the bane of our(women) existence in my opinion.

  So, getting back to Feminism, when it comes to being an active participant in what seemingly is the opposite side of equality and justice for everyone.  I have to admit, I have danced to fabulous music that  had one or more negatives like sexual assault, misogynistic and chauvinistic words. It’s definitely not something I  ever used to think about while dancing, and as an adult i found it  upsetting when what was being said became clear; generally this kind of talk would get a whole different response if these words were being exchanged through a conversation. In this 21st Century we do hear more Women with edgy lyrics and come to find out that a story or two based out of reality have come to light …so, the choice to listen is up to you.

   However, it does appear that the word feminism and or being a feminist in this 21st society is ever changing ever evolving to being about a belief in equality and the rights of everyone in all its forms and genders. I see the urban dictionary as being a place not only run by a younger group of folks but who use it and research the “stuff” they post. I admit to not referring to the urban dictionary that much, but found the post in the process of searching what younger folks felt about the comments on who is or can be a feminist, it caught my eye.  As you read on, Cosmo asked stars like lady gaga, lana del rey and Taylor Swift just to name a few, but when Pharrell was asked he stated, “I don’t think it’s possible for me to be (a feminist). I’m a man, but I do support feminists.”

Anyway, an article worth reading in Cosmo September 2014 ~~ Nativegrl77

What do you think? Is being a feminist gender specific?

 

At least 4,000 were lynched – a repost … reminder


A group documenting lynchings is trying to erect markers at the sites, but expects local opposition.

Nearly 4,000 African Americans were victims of “racial terror lynchings” in the South between 1877 and 1950, according to a new report by the Equal Justice Initiative.

The report, released today, is the result of some five years of research by the organization. It has found that racial terror lynching was much more prevalent than previously reported. The researchers documented several hundred more lynchings than had been identified in the past. They did so by reviewing local newspapers, historical archives and court records. They also conducted interviews with local historians, and the families and descendants of the victims.

In all, EJI documented 3,959 lynchings of black people in twelve Southern states, which is at least 700 more lynchings in these states than previously reported. More than half of the lynching victims were killed under accusation of committing murder or rape against white victims. The EJI says that racial hostility fed suspicion that the perpetrators of the crimes were black and the accusations were seldom scrutinized. “Of the hundreds of black people lynched under accusation of rape and murder, nearly all were killed without being legally convicted,” says the report.

Some states and regions were particularly terrifying for African Americans, with dramatically higher rates of lynchings compared to the rest of the South. These areas included Florida, Mississippi, Arkansas and Louisiana. Counties that were particularly terrifying were Hernando, Taylor, Lafayette, and Citrus counties in Florida; Early and Oconee counties in Georgia; Fulton County, Kentucky; and Moore County, Tennessee, which had the highest rates of lynchings. Phillips County, Arkansas, and Lafourche and Tensas parishes in Louisiana were regions of mass killings of African Americans that make them historically notorious. Georgia and Mississippi had the highest number of lynchings of all the Southern states.

In conversations with survivors of those that had been lynched, EJI found that lynching played an integral role in the migration of millions of African Americans away from Southern states.

EJI also found that there was an astonishing lack of effort to acknowledge, discuss or address lynching in Southern states and communities. According to the report, many of these communities tried to veil this violent past by erecting monuments memorializing the Confederacy and the Civil War instead, while hiding the violence and terror used against African Americans.

The report says that there are currently few memorials that address the legacy of lynching, and that most communities do not actively  recognize how their race relations were shaped by terror lynching.

Bryan Stevenson of EJI told the New York Times that his group wants to force people to reckon with the country’s violent and racist past by erecting the memorials. He said the EJI hopes to select some of the lynching sites and erect markers there. This will involve a significant amount of fundraising by the non-profit group. EJI is also bracing for controversies and objections as it tries to erect these markers.

“Lynching and the terror era shaped the geography, politics, economics and social characteristics of being black in America during the 20th century,” said Stevenson.

The report by EJI is part of a larger project that also involves the recognition of slave markets in the South and the erection of markers on those sites, particularly in Montgomery, AL. Stevenson said that  regional and state governments have not been receptive to such markers although there are plenty of Civil War memorials in Montgomery, as well as some Civil Rights movement markers.