Tag Archives: medicare

Medicare is NOT “Going Broke” – Center Medicare for Advocacy


Medicare is not in crisis. It is on solid financial footing, and, in fact, is stronger than was predicted before the enactment of the Affordable Care Act.

Medicare Part A is mostly paid for with payroll taxes which go into a trust fund. Prior to the enactment of the ACA, the Part A trust fund was expected to be insolvent in 2017. As a result of the ACA and the recession, the trust fund is not expected to be insolvent until 2028.[1]  However, even if Medicare Part A were to become insolvent by spending more than it is taking in, the program will still be able to pay out 87 percent of its benefits.[2]  While not ideal, this is a far cry from “bankruptcy.”  Further, the date of projected insolvency is not set in stone, and could easily change. The trust fund largely reflects the health of the economy. At various times since 1970, the trustees have projected Trust Fund insolvency in as few as 4 years or as many as 28 years.[3]

Importantly, funding for Medicare Part B and Medicare Part D comes from beneficiary premiums and the government’s “General Fund” –  they are a federal budget item, just like, for example, the Defense Department. Whether to, and how much to, fund these items is a purely political decision.

Let’s not let our elected officials make the wrong decisions about Medicare.

_________________________

 

[1] Board of Trustees, Federal Hospital Insurance and Federal Supplementary Health Insurance Trust Funds. “2016 Annual Report.” 22 June 2016. https://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Statistics-Trends-and-Reports/ReportsTrustFunds/downloads/tr2016.pdf (site visited November 15, 2016). P.5.
[2] Ibid.
[3] Phil Galewitz and Marilyn Werber Sarafini. “Trustees Issue Warnings on Medicare But Make No Changes to Solvency Projections.” Kansas Health Institute. 24 April 2012. http://www.khi.org/news/article/trustees-issue-warnings-medicare-make-no-changes-s (site visited November 16, 2016).

AARP,Fred Griesbach sends a message you can trust


It’s terrifying, but it’s true.

AARP Advocacy Alert

Congress wants to dramatically weaken Medicare, which could open the door to vouchers and slashed benefits.

They want to institute an “age tax” that would force older Americans to pay thousands more for health care.

They want to give billions in handouts to insurance and drug companies, and stick you with the bill.

All of that adds up to putting Medicare in danger and making people like you pay as much as $8,000 more just to keep your same health coverage.

AARP is opposing this bill, and we need you standing with us. 57,226 AARP activists have already told their Representatives to vote NO. Add your voice right now: Tell Congress to fight for your health, not for special interests!

The problem with health care is skyrocketing costs – and that won’t get fixed with $200 billion in handouts to drug, insurance, and medical device companies.

Congress should work for ordinary Americans, not to line the pockets of special interests.

That’s why AARP is opposing this bill – and we need you to stand with us.

Tell your Representative to vote NO on the American Health Care Act.

AARP is 38 million members strong. We’re nonpartisan, nonprofit, and nationwide. And when we speak up together, Congress must listen.

We won’t sit by while millions see their premiums skyrocket and their benefits put at risk – while insurance and drug companies get even richer.

Stand with us – and tell your Representative to vote NO on the American Health Care Act.

I’ll be in touch soon with more. Thanks for all that you do to protect health care for older Americans.

Sincerely,

Fred Griesbach
AARP Campaigns

P.S. Want to learn more about AARP’s objections to this bill? Read our letter to Congress.

Lawrence Guyot : a Civil Rights Leader, in memory of


By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON November 25, 2012 (AP)

Lawrence Guyot, a civil rights leader who survived jailhouse beatings in the Deep South in the 1960s and went on to encourage generations to get involved, has died. He was 73.

Guyot had a history of heart problems and suffered from diabetes, and died at home in Mount Rainier, Md., his daughter Julie Guyot-Diangone said late Saturday. She said he died sometime Thursday night; other media reported he passed away Friday.

A Mississippi native, Guyot (pronounced GHEE-ott) worked for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and served as director of the 1964 Freedom Summer Project, which brought thousands of young people to the state to register blacks to vote despite a history of violence and intimidation by authorities. He also chaired the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, which sought to have blacks included among the state’s delegates to the 1964 Democratic National Convention. The bid was rejected, but another civil rights activist, Fannie Lou Hamer, addressed the convention during a nationally televised appearance.

Guyot was severely beaten several times, including at the notorious Mississippi State Penitentiary known as Parchman Farm. He continued to speak on voting rights until his death, including encouraging people to cast ballots for President Barack Obama.

Lawrence Guyot.JPEG
AP
FILE – Lawrence Guyot, a Student Nonviolent… View Full Caption
FILE – Lawrence Guyot, a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee member in Mississippi during the civil rights struggles of the 1960s recalls his work in Hattiesburg and the women who assisted in the struggles, in this Oct. 22, 2010 file photo taken in Hattiesburg, Miss.His daughter Julie Guyot-Diangone said late Saturday Nov. 24, 2012 he died late Thursday or early Friday outside Washington, D.C. at the age of 73. Guyot, a civil rights leader who survived jailhouse beatings in the Deep South in the 1960s and went on to encourage generations to get involved in various causes, had a history of heart problems and suffered from diabetes. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis) Close

“He was a civil rights field worker right up to the end,” Guyot-Diangone said.

Guyot participated in the 40th anniversary of the Freedom Summer Project to make sure a new generation could learn about the civil rights movement.

“There is nothing like having risked your life with people over something immensely important to you,” he told The Clarion-Ledger in 2004. “As Churchill said, there’s nothing more exhilarating than to have been shot at — and missed.”

His daughter said she recently saw him on a bus encouraging people to register to vote and asking about their political views. She said he was an early backer of gay marriage, noting that when he married a white woman, interracial marriage was illegal in some states. He met his wife Monica while they both worked for racial equality.

“He followed justice,” his daughter said. “He followed what was consistent with his values, not what was fashionable. He just pushed people along with him.”

Susan Glisson, executive director of the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation at the University of Mississippi, called Guyot “a towering figure, a real warrior for freedom and justice.”

“He loved to mentor young people. That’s how I met him,” she said.

When she attended Ole Miss, students reached out to civil rights activists and Guyot responded.

“He was very opinionated,” she said. “But always — he always backed up his opinions with detailed facts. He always pushed you to think more deeply and to be more strategic. It could be long days of debate about the way forward. But once the path was set, there was nobody more committed to the path.”

Glisson said Guyot’s efforts helped lay the groundwork for the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

“Mississippi has more black elected officials than any other state in the country, and that’s a direct tribute to his work,” she said

WASHINGTON November 25, 2012 (AP)

Guyot was born in Pass Christian, Miss., on July 17, 1939. He became active in civil rights while attending Tougaloo College in Mississippi, and graduated in 1963. Guyot received a law degree in 1971 from Rutgers University, and then moved to Washington, where he worked to elect fellow Mississippian and civil rights activist Marion Barry as mayor in 1978.

“When he came to Washington, he continued his revolutionary zeal,” Barry told The Washington Post on Friday. “He was always busy working for the people.”

Lawrence Guyot.JPEG
AP
FILE – Lawrence Guyot, 23, of Greenwood,… View Full Caption
FILE – Lawrence Guyot, 23, of Greenwood, Miss., removed his shirt in Jackson, Miss., to show newsmen where he says Greenwood and Winona police beat him with leather slapsticks, in this June 14, 1963 file photo. His daughter Julie Guyot-Diangone said late Saturday Nov. 24, 2012 he died late Thursday or early Friday outside Washington, D.C. at the age of 73. Guyot, a civil rights leader who survived jailhouse beatings in the Deep South in the 1960s and went on to encourage generations to get involved in various causes, had a history of heart problems and suffered from diabetes. (AP Photo/Jim Bourdier, File) Close

Guyot worked for the District of Columbia government in various capacities and as a neighborhood advisory commissioner.

D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton told The Post in 2007 that she first met Guyot within days of his beating at a jail in Winona, Miss. “Because of Larry Guyot, I understood what it meant to live with terror and to walk straight into it,” she told the newspaper. On Friday, she called Guyot “an unsung hero” of the civil rights movement.

“Very few Mississippians were willing to risk their lives at that time,” she said. “But Guyot did.”

In recent months, his daughter said he was concerned about what he said were Republican efforts to limit access to the polls. As his health was failing, he voted early because he wanted to make sure his vote was counted, he told the AFRO newspaper.

Meet Newt … in his own words


Newt and Trump Talk ‘Apprentice’ Program For 10 Poor Kids … some videos have been deleted … go figure

Poor kids could work as Janitors

Poor Children have no values, no work habits, no cash unless it’s gotten illegally

Child labor laws are stupid

4 things to remeber ….rep. Paul Ryan


GOP_Elephant_WRONG_WAY_small

 

Here are four things to remember about Paul Ryan

#1: Paul Ryan is the chief architect of the extreme GOP budget
— of which Mitt Romney is a huge fan. It funds tax breaks for the
wealthiest with severe cuts to investments in education, scientific
research, and clean energy. The middle class shoulders the burden.

#2: He’s the author of the original plan to turn Medicare into a voucher system
— which the Romney-Ryan ticket has absorbed, hiking out-of-pocket
costs by $6,000 per year. He also backed a proposal to privatize Social
Security, which would let the whims of the stock market take over
retirement security.

#3: Just like Mitt Romney, he’s severely conservative
and has consistently taken a stance against women. He voted against the
Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, and co-sponsored a bill that could ban
all abortion, including in cases of rape and incest — and even some
common forms of birth control.

#4: Paul Ryan, like Mitt Romney, will say absolutely anything to win votes, no matter how far it is from the truth.

I know our vice president will make us proud tonight. But we’ve also
seen from Ryan’s vicious, dishonest speech at the Republican Convention
that this is a guy who embraces Mitt Romney’s “say anything, don’t worry
about fact-checkers” campaign strategy.

You can help
Barack Obama and Joe Biden win another four years in the White House
and keep Romney-Ryan, with their campaign of distortion, out of it: