Tag Archives: politics

Meet Republican Tom Cotton … a repost &reminder


Yes, this man was given a seat in Congress … the man and his Republican crew in Congress seem more dangerous to our very democracy now …

U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton, you may remember, was a co-sponsor of the “Life at Conception Act,” a so-called personhood measure which would give full constitutional rights to each “preborn human person” at the “moment of fertilization. In addition to being a frontal assault on Roe v. Wade, the bill (likely unconstitutional) could ban certain forms of birth control such as IUDs or the morning-after pill. (It could also potentially force women into dangerous pregnancies and to deliver babies that can’t survive outside the womb, or force families in situations like this to keep a braindead woman on life support). COTTON: Co-sponsored bill that could ban certain forms of birth control. Click the graphic for the complete article  COTTON: Co-sponsored bill that could ban certain forms of birth control.

I know no candidate is perfect but if they are running to represent you as a Public Servant there are certain mandatory things they should all live up to … like the oath they take, which is seemingly being tossed aside by Republicans

I am sure there must be more information about where Tom Cotton stands on the issues …. do your research

I have to say that having spent a few minutes looking for actual comments from Mr.Cotton about the issues facing our 21st Century lives is not readily available. I went to plenty of sites, but one that claims they are a factcheck site seemed somewhat biased against mark pryor though they did divulge that Rep tom cotton did have an association or worked with the insurance industry at one time stating, “Cotton’s insurance experience is limited to consulting work for a federal agency.” This seems significant to me, but I am no expert.  The article does not think his consulting work is important, but seems to use the potato paatato meme quite often in their fact checking when his constituents deserve to know what part he played as an insurance consultant. I have a problem with the bottom line! That Rep.Tom Cotton seems to back stripping seniors of Medicare, assuming women have no common sense, backing  any budget coming from Rep.Paul Ryan – Those are just a few of many issues that seems buried in a lot of the surface articles concerning Mr. Cotton. So, it would be in the best interest of the People in Arkansas to ask questions of Tom Cotton … Where do you stand in this 21st Century life? Climate Change, Reproductive Rights, Immigration, ACA and tell your constituents why the GOP has no viable replacement bills plans to replace anything they may want to repeal ? I think the lack of plans offered up proves just how unqualified the 113th Republican members of Congress are

So, there is more information …. of course and for the complete article ~ search for the2013 headline in huffingtonpost.com

Tom Cotton In 1997: Women’s ‘Greatest Fear’ Is Men Leaving Them

Posted: 08/09/2013 1:48 pm EDT  |  Updated: 08/13/2013

among other things …below

Cotton, a freshman congressman who is running for Senate in 2014, warned feminists in a 1997 article for the Harvard Crimson that no-fault divorce will backfire on them by enabling their husbands to leave them for trophy wives.

“Feminists say no fault divorce was a large hurdle on the path to female liberation,” Cotton wrote. “They apparently don’t consult the deepest hopes or greatest fears of young women.”

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Washington ~ Gov. Inslee in the Newsroom


 

  • Washington will soon become the fifth state in the U.S. to offer a paid family and medical leave program for workers. It’s arguably the most forward-thinking paid family leave program in the nation.
  • Gov. Jay Inslee recently signed a bill to restructure how the state serves at-risk children and youth by creating the Department of Children, Youth and Families. It will be led by Ross Hunter, director of the state’s Department of Early Learning.
  • Washington is home to thousands of immigrants and refugees. If you or someone you know needs assistance understanding the potential impacts of these orders or are experiencing problems related to restricted travel or securing the appropriate visa or refugee documentation, the following state agencies and organizations might be able to help.

  • Washington recently ranked as the No.1 to do business, according to an annual CNBC study. The state leads in economic growth, technological innovation, workforce and quality of life.
  • Washington lawmakers have passed legislation to fully fund the state’s K-12 public schools. The agreement was signed into law by Gov. Jay Inslee.

On this Day … Moby Dick Published


On this day in 1851, Moby-Dick, a novel by Herman Melville about the voyage of the whaling ship Pequod, is published by Harper & Brothers in New York. Moby-Dick is now considered a great classic of American literature and contains one of the most famous opening lines in fiction: “Call me Ishmael.” Initially, though, the book about Captain Ahab and his quest for a giant white whale was a flop.

Herman Melville was born in New York City in 1819 and as a young man spent time in the merchant marines, the U.S. Navy and on a whaling ship in the South Seas. In 1846, he published his first novel, Typee, a romantic adventure based on his experiences in Polynesia. The book was a success and a sequel, Omoo, was published in 1847. Three more novels followed, with mixed critical and commercial results. Melville’s sixth book, Moby-Dick, was first published in October 1851 in London, in three volumes titled The Whale, and then in the U.S. a month later. Melville had promised his publisher an adventure story similar to his popular earlier works, but instead, Moby-Dick was a tragic epic, influenced in part by Melville’s friend and Pittsfield, Massachusetts, neighbor, Nathaniel Hawthorne, whose novels include The Scarlet Letter.

After Moby-Dick‘s disappointing reception, Melville continued to produce novels, short stories (Bartleby) and poetry, but writing wasn’t paying the bills so in 1865 he returned to New York to work as a customs inspector, a job he held for 20 years.

Melville died in 1891, largely forgotten by the literary world. By the 1920s, scholars had rediscovered his work, particularly Moby-Dick, which would eventually become a staple of high school reading lists across the United States. Billy Budd, Melville’s final novel, was published in 1924, 33 years after his death.

history.com

FDA/USDA ~~ October 2017 Alerts&Safety Farmers&Ranchers extra time to file Claim Losses


FDR had something to say about voting


votingFranklin D. Roosevelt once said

“Nobody will ever deprive the American people of the right to vote except the American people themselves and the only way they could do this is by not voting.”